Footgear...

Okay… It’s been recommended that I wear boots with a heel and that cover
my ankles. I believe that that’s what George Peck always recommends. But,
I’m feeling a bit awkward and clunky. I already have big feet but with
boots on they seem too wide. Also I never seem to use the heel to set my
position anyway.

Could you guys get into some detail here as to what footgear to use?

I imagine that some prefer running shoes. I DO feel a need to protect my
ankles. Maybe hightop runners?? (Using Canadian terminology here. We
don’t normally say ‘tennis-shoes’ or ‘sneakers’. Actually I laugh every
time I hear sneakers. I picture someone sneaking up behind someone else
cartoon style.)

Tread or no tread? Hard or gummy or rubbery? Flexable or stiff? Type of
lacing/fastening? Leather or cloth?

Thanks.

Christopher Grove


“I never MET a man I didn’t like.” -Will Rogers

Read my short story at: http://www.rosedog.com/manuscript.asp?m=9389256&m-
anuscript=6862016&t=The+Determination+of+Jeffery&fn=Christopher&ln=Grove&-
srdt=9%2F27%2F01+5%3A32%3A05+AM&fs=2&ff=Arial%2C+Helvetica%2C+Verdana&ps=-
4000&s=735143750&folder=Search+Results

> Tread or no tread? Hard or gummy or rubbery? Flexable or stiff? Type of
> lacing/fastening? Leather or cloth?

I use artificial turf shoes, or golf shoes. These have a knobby tread on
the bottom, which give a great grip on the pedals, and also works well for
wheel walking activities. The shoes I wear are not particularly stiff, nor
do they offer good support but they work for me.

I used to wear MacGregor turf shoes from Kmart, but I haven’t been able to
find any of those in a very long time. More recently I got two pairs of
turf shoes from Nike at a local sports outlet. These turf shoes are
somewhere between “cleats”, more aggressive bottom stuff, and simple bumps
and groves. Look for a pattern of square knobs that covers most or all of
the bottom of the shoe. Supposedly these shoes are intended for golf, or
for soccer or other sports on artificial turf.

I think I would do better on shoes with a stiffer sole, but I have not
tried any. I think they’d be much better for trail or road riding, but not
for tricks.

Covering your ankles is good if you have problems with clipping your
ankles on the cranks. I haven’t had this problem since my early days of
riding, but I imagine it’s a bigger issue on something like George
Peck’s ultimate wheels-with-cranks. My shoes don’t cover the ankles, but
you could try some high-tops as an in-between solution (less protection
than boots).

Using your heels to lock onto the pedals is only useful if you’re going
slow. This is probably the case if you’re off-roading with an ultimate
wheel, and I imagine they are very good for that. Or for very rough
terrain or just slow riding.

When I see other riders using their heel on the pedal, it’s usually for
one of two reasons:

  1. They are beginners and don’t know better
  2. They are wearing smooth-bottomed shoes or boots, so it’s the only place
    they have a sure grip on the pedal.

#2 was (and is) the case for many professional performers, if
#they’re using
dress shoes. Most performers don’t ride fast or furious on the stage, but
mosly idle and do other things that work with the heels.

If I were to wear boots, I would prefer some kind of hiking boot with a
stiffer sole than what I’m used to, but definitely with knobby bottoms to
grip my pedals.

To sum up, my turf shoes work great for me, and that’s about all I’ve worn
for serious unicycling for almost 20 years. But my feet are okay with the
lack of support, and you may need something stiffer for comfort and power.

Stay on top, John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone jfoss@unicycling.com
www.unicycling.com

“Freedom is not free”

AXO makes something called the Ankle Biter that protects the ankle bone.
They can be worn with any regular shoe. Dan’s Competition
(http://www.danscomp.com/) sells them online. $22.99 USD

For muni I wear flat skateboard or BMX shoes. My favorites are Vans.
But Vans come in three levles of stiffness. Really flexable, just
right, and too stiff. You want the ones that are just right. The Vans
Swizzle is a good shoe to start with. It can be found at Vans outlet
stores. Vans VMX Flat is too stiff for muni. Vans Old Skool and Vans
Insurrection are too flexable.

You want something with a good flat soft rubber sole that will grip the
pedal well. For stiffness you want something that is stiff enough so your
foot doesn’t wrap around the pedal yet flexable enough so you get good
grip on the pedal. Most of the good skateboard shoes have just the right
stiffness. If the shoe is too flexible you’ll end up with sore feet after
the ride and may develop arch problems. If the shoe is too stiff you will
not get good grip on the pedal.

john_childs

>From: Christopher Grove <c_r_grove@yahoo.com>
>
>
>Could you guys get into some detail here as to what footgear to use?
>


Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp

On 17 Oct 2001 12:42:31 -0700, john_childs@hotmail.com (John
Childs) wrote:

>AXO makes something called the Ankle Biter that protects the ankle bone.

What’s in a name…

“To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has been picked
automagically from a database:” “bomb, Sudan, Bagdad”

Chris,

David Poznanter introduced us to the Active Ankle brand at the '99 MUni
weekend. I use them for Trials, MUni, freestyle, and my ongoing battle
with the ultimate wheel. I’ve had no anxle injury since. Now I’m looking
for a product called “Active Shoulder”.

-John

“John Childs” <john_childs@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:F169wuVjtQUGUzLhG4Y0000a2d1@hotmail.com
> AXO makes something called the Ankle Biter that protects the ankle bone.
> They can be worn with any regular shoe. Dan’s Competition
> (http://www.danscomp.com/) sells them online. $22.99 USD
>
> For muni I wear flat skateboard or BMX shoes. My favorites are Vans. But
> Vans come in three levles of stiffness. Really flexable, just right, and
> too stiff. You want the ones that are just right. The Vans Swizzle is a
> good shoe to start with. It can be found at Vans outlet stores. Vans VMX
> Flat is too stiff for muni. Vans Old Skool and Vans Insurrection are too
> flexable.
>
> You want something with a good flat soft rubber sole that will grip
> the pedal well. For stiffness you want something that is stiff enough
> so your foot doesn’t wrap around the pedal yet flexable enough so you
> get good
grip
> on the pedal. Most of the good skateboard shoes have just the right
> stiffness. If the shoe is too flexible you’ll end up with sore feet
> after the ride and may develop arch problems. If the shoe is too stiff
> you will not get good grip on the pedal.
>
> john_childs
>
> >From: Christopher Grove <c_r_grove@yahoo.com>
> >
> >
> >Could you guys get into some detail here as to what footgear to use?
> >
>
>
> _________________________________________________________________
> Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at
> http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp

For the past few days of my progression on one wheel I’ve forgone ankle
protection and just used my everyday runners. I didn’t hurt my ankles once
either time out and it was a nice improvement as far as comfort.

I will have to make a trip to a cycling or sports store and look at what
is available there.

Looking at George’s ‘monster truck’ uni (as John describes it) those
beartrap peddles maybe better with heels than the peddles that I have.
(I’m not sure what their type is but they are common ‘Wellgo’ mountain
bike peddles) I imagine that the beartrap type, being more squared off,
catch in front of the heel better.

In anycase even though I didn’t have any mishaps this time out the BMX
style shoes with the higher crank-side ankle protection might me good.

Thanks all for the advice.

<snip all>


“I never MET a man I didn’t like.” -Will Rogers

Read my short story at: http://www.rosedog.com/manuscript.asp?m=9389256&m-
anuscript=6862016&t=The+Determination+of+Jeffery&fn=Christopher&ln=Grove&-
srdt=9%2F27%2F01+5%3A32%3A05+AM&fs=2&ff=Arial%2C+Helvetica%2C+Verdana&ps=-
4000&s=735143750&folder=Search+Results

For the past few days of my progression on one wheel I’ve forgone ankle
protection and just used my everyday runners. I didn’t hurt my ankles once
either time out and it was a nice improvement as far as comfort.

I will have to make a trip to a cycling or sports store and look at what
is available there.

Looking at George’s ‘monster truck’ uni (as John describes it) those
beartrap peddles maybe better with heels than the peddles that I have.
(I’m not sure what their type is but they are common ‘Wellgo’ mountain
bike peddles) I imagine that the beartrap type, being more squared off,
catch in front of the heel better.

In anycase even though I didn’t have any mishaps this time out the BMX
style shoes with the higher crank-side ankle protection might me good.

Thanks all for the advice.

Christopher Grove

<snip all>


“I never MET a man I didn’t like.” -Will Rogers

Read my short story at: http://www.rosedog.com/manuscript.asp?m=9389256&m-
anuscript=6862016&t=The+Determination+of+Jeffery&fn=Christopher&ln=Grove&-
srdt=9%2F27%2F01+5%3A32%3A05+AM&fs=2&ff=Arial%2C+Helvetica%2C+Verdana&ps=-
4000&s=735143750&folder=Search+Results

Christopher,

BTW: the invention of rubber soled shoes was strikingly different from leather/wood shoe bases: no click clack of heal on cobble or floar boards. One could now walk fully clad into the kitchen at night, and eat the last piece of pie undetected. Ergo, the “Sneaker”. This radical leap in sneakyness technology has only been exceaded by the unicycle, overtaking unsuspecting joggers, dog walkers and marching bands with narry a sound.

(which may cross thread with your cool-name query: Uni-Ninja, The wheeled master of stealth, or Christopher Grove, Agent O)

On topic, I have been using some ultra-gripy studded Twisted Odyssey pedals, and don’t have much of a traction issue (they are a little big for my 24’ wheel, though, and can scrape going into a tight turn). I am more concerned with a streamline shape to keep me from cliping a toe when mounting or riding one foot, etc. I have been considering Convers High-Tops, just on looks, but am a bit worried about inadiquet toe protection.

Christopher LeFay
The Uni-Clone (send in the Clones?)

When i go out for a ride, unless i’m just doing a quick demo, i nearly always wear a normal pair of Duffs, which being made as casual street shoes and also for bmx/skateboarding have a flat yet rather grippy sole, and they seem to work fine for me. to protect my ankles a have a pair of tibia guards that come down low enough to do the job. Has anyone every tired to use a clip-on on a unicycle? I was thinking about it and figure they’d be good for jmping and hopping as the unicycle is attacked, but not so good when you crash or fall off, i spose you’d just have to not fall off.

> When i go out for a ride, unless i’m just doing a quick demo, i nearly
> always wear a normal pair of Duffs, which being made as casual street
> shoes and also for bmx/skateboarding have a flat yet rather grippy sole,
> and they seem to work fine for me. to protect my ankles a have a pair of
> tibia guards that come down low enough to do the job. Has anyone every
> tired to use a clip-on on a unicycle? I was thinking about it and figure
> they’d be good for jmping and hopping as the unicycle is attacked, but
> not so good when you crash or fall off, i spose you’d just have to not
> fall off.

I haven’t ridden with clipless (clip-on) pedals, but I think you have
to twist your foot to release them. On a bike clipping out isn’t much
of a problem cos you usually have enough warning for your reflexes to
kick in and unclip, but in a uni crash, you don’t have enough warning
to unclip? Also, in most of my worse crashes I’ve flown away from the
uni, I’m not sure if it wouldn’t be hard to unclip when you’re pulling
on the pedals hard.

Toe-clips are bad on a uni again because the direction you’re falling off
in is usually the worst release direction.

I’d be scared of clipping in because of the fail to unclip, wheel stops,
you go flat on your face things. Same as what happens when you get your
shoelace caught in the crank.

I think I heard of someone using them for riding in track races though,
where falling off is less of an issue I guess.

Joe

I tried “Look” clipless pedals on a 28" uni a few years ago. 1st ride was
brilliant loads of control, loads of power. 2nd ride I fell forward whilst
clipped in - it was worse (and quicker) than winding up a shoelace. 3rd
ride …Never tried them again!

I used to use half-clips (no straps) and they were pretty good especially
for powering up hill and I never had any bad falls. Tricky to freemount
into off road though.

Leo White

There’s an engineering challenge here coz being clipped on apparently has
significant pros and cons. Maybe some special type of quick release? A
clip-on device that somehow detects that things are going wrong and then
lets go automatically (and reliably!)?

Who has an idea?

Klaas Bil

On 22 Oct 2001 18:32:27 GMT, leofwhite@aol.com (LEOFWHITE) wrote:

>I tried “Look” clipless pedals on a 28" uni a few years ago. 1st ride was
>brilliant loads of control, loads of power. 2nd ride I fell forward
>whilst clipped in - it was worse (and quicker) than winding up a
>shoelace. 3rd ride …Never tried them again!
>
>I used to use half-clips (no straps) and they were pretty good especially
>for powering up hill and I never had any bad falls. Tricky to freemount
>into off road though.
>
>Leo White


“To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has been
picked automagically from a database:” “Zyklon B, Robert Hanssen, Pretty
Good Privacy”

“Klaas Bil” <klaasbil_remove_the_spamkiller_@xs4all.nl> wrote in message
news:3bd4a1a2.6655219@newszilla.xs4all.nl
> There’s an engineering challenge here coz being clipped on apparently
> has significant pros and cons. Maybe some special type of quick release?
> A clip-on device that somehow detects that things are going wrong and
> then lets go automatically (and reliably!)?
>
> Who has an idea?
>
> Klaas Bil

I’ll bite…

How about having a partial clip on the interior side of the pedal? It
would look like only one third of the clip was left. It would have to be
much stiffer than a regular clip since it can’t ‘strap’ across.

It seems like I saw something like this years ago with the exception that
it was on the outer edge of the pedal (of a bicycle). Being on the
interior of the pedal would allow quick escape. If you want to pull up on
the pedal, just squeeze in to grip the clip.

If it’s not going to be used, just flip the pedal over. Since its on the
interior, it shouldn’t scrape when cornering.

Doug

“Klaas Bil” <klaasbil_remove_the_spamkiller_@xs4all.nl> wrote in message
news:3bd4a1a2.6655219@newszilla.xs4all.nl
> There’s an engineering challenge here coz being clipped on apparently
> has significant pros and cons. Maybe some special type of quick release?
> A clip-on device that somehow detects that things are going wrong and
> then lets go automatically (and reliably!)?
>
> Who has an idea?
>
> Klaas Bil

I’ll bite…

How about having a partial clip on the interior side of the pedal? It
would look like only one third of the clip was left. It would have to be
much stiffer than a regular clip since it can’t ‘strap’ across.

It seems like I saw something like this years ago with the exception that
it was on the outer edge of the pedal (of a bicycle). Being on the
interior of the pedal would allow quick escape. If you want to pull up on
the pedal, just squeeze in to grip the clip.

If it’s not going to be used, just flip the pedal over. Since its on the
interior, it shouldn’t scrape when cornering.

Doug

“Klaas Bil” <klaasbil_remove_the_spamkiller_@xs4all.nl> wrote in message
news:3bd4a1a2.6655219@newszilla.xs4all.nl
> There’s an engineering challenge here coz being clipped on apparently
> has significant pros and cons. Maybe some special type of quick release?
> A clip-on device that somehow detects that things are going wrong and
> then lets go automatically (and reliably!)?
>
> Who has an idea?
>
> Klaas Bil

I’ll bite…

How about having a partial clip on the interior side of the pedal? It
would look like only one third of the clip was left. It would have to be
much stiffer than a regular clip since it can’t ‘strap’ across.

It seems like I saw something like this years ago with the exception that
it was on the outer edge of the pedal (of a bicycle). Being on the
interior of the pedal would allow quick escape. If you want to pull up on
the pedal, just squeeze in to grip the clip.

If it’s not going to be used, just flip the pedal over. Since its on the
interior, it shouldn’t scrape when cornering.

Doug

“Klaas Bil” <klaasbil_remove_the_spamkiller_@xs4all.nl> wrote in message
news:3bd4a1a2.6655219@newszilla.xs4all.nl
> There’s an engineering challenge here coz being clipped on apparently
> has significant pros and cons. Maybe some special type of quick release?
> A clip-on device that somehow detects that things are going wrong and
> then lets go automatically (and reliably!)?
>
> Who has an idea?
>
> Klaas Bil

I’ll bite…

How about having a partial clip on the interior side of the pedal? It
would look like only one third of the clip was left. It would have to be
much stiffer than a regular clip since it can’t ‘strap’ across.

It seems like I saw something like this years ago with the exception that
it was on the outer edge of the pedal (of a bicycle). Being on the
interior of the pedal would allow quick escape. If you want to pull up on
the pedal, just squeeze in to grip the clip.

If it’s not going to be used, just flip the pedal over. Since its on the
interior, it shouldn’t scrape when cornering.

Doug

Hey Chris… Where excactly in Canada do you Live? )—(x) Dylan Wallinger
Keep Riding http://www.extremeunicycling-bcmat.cityslide.com

Dylan Wallinger wrote:
>
> Hey Chris… Where excactly in Canada do you Live? )—(x) Dylan
> Wallinger Keep Riding http://www.extremeunicycling-bcmat.cityslide.com

I grew up in the Hamilton/Toronto/Niagara Peninsula area but presently I’m
living with my American wife in Ypsilanti, Michigan.

I’m a bit homesick sometimes, but I’m probably going to be here for a
couple of more years. I do get back every other weekend though.

You must be in the general vicinity of Kris Holmes, no?

Christopher


“I never MET a man I didn’t like.” -Will Rogers

Read my short story at: http://www.rosedog.com/manuscript.asp?m=9389256&m-
anuscript=6862016&t=The+Determination+of+Jeffery&fn=Christopher&ln=Grove&-
srdt=9%2F27%2F01+5%3A32%3A05+AM&fs=2&ff=Arial%2C+Helvetica%2C+Verdana&ps=-
4000&s=735143750&folder=Search+Results

It’s a beginning. But (i) how comfortable would it be on the feet to have
a partial clip like that when pulling up? (ii) how safe would it be in an
emergemcy? As to (ii): your natural tendency is normally to move the foot
outward on the side where you fall, so that would help.

My idea (which is less feasible than Doug’s but maybe someone can build on
it) is to have the equivalent of a “dead man’s knob” (on a train),
something you have to press constantly e.g. a rubber ball in your hand. If
you let go when you bail out, the clip releases.

Keep on brainstorming, Klaas Bil

On Tue, 23 Oct 2001 03:09:03 GMT, “Doug Massey” <dvm@mmcable.com> wrote:

>
>“Klaas Bil” <klaasbil_remove_the_spamkiller_@xs4all.nl> wrote in message
>news:3bd4a1a2.6655219@newszilla.xs4all.nl
>> There’s an engineering challenge here coz being clipped on apparently
>> has significant pros and cons. Maybe some special type of quick
>> release? A clip-on device that somehow detects that things are going
>> wrong and then lets go automatically (and reliably!)?
>>
>> Who has an idea?
>>
>> Klaas Bil
>
>I’ll bite…
>
>How about having a partial clip on the interior side of the pedal? It
>would look like only one third of the clip was left. It would have to be
>much stiffer than a regular clip since it can’t ‘strap’ across.
>
>It seems like I saw something like this years ago with the exception that
>it was on the outer edge of the pedal (of a bicycle). Being on the
>interior of the pedal would allow quick escape. If you want to pull up on
>the pedal, just squeeze in to grip the clip.
>
>If it’s not going to be used, just flip the pedal over. Since its on the
>interior, it shouldn’t scrape when cornering.
>
>Doug
>
>
>


“To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has been picked
automagically from a database:” “Ebola, Omar Abdel Rahman, Pentagon”

It’s a beginning. But (i) how comfortable would it be on the feet to have
a partial clip like that when pulling up? (ii) how safe would it be in an
emergemcy? As to (ii): your natural tendency is normally to move the foot
outward on the side where you fall, so that would help.

My idea (which is less feasible than Doug’s but maybe someone can build on
it) is to have the equivalent of a “dead man’s knob” (on a train),
something you have to press constantly e.g. a rubber ball in your hand. If
you let go when you bail out, the clip releases.

Keep on brainstorming, Klaas Bil

On Tue, 23 Oct 2001 03:09:03 GMT, “Doug Massey” <dvm@mmcable.com> wrote:

>
>“Klaas Bil” <klaasbil_remove_the_spamkiller_@xs4all.nl> wrote in message
>news:3bd4a1a2.6655219@newszilla.xs4all.nl
>> There’s an engineering challenge here coz being clipped on apparently
>> has significant pros and cons. Maybe some special type of quick
>> release? A clip-on device that somehow detects that things are going
>> wrong and then lets go automatically (and reliably!)?
>>
>> Who has an idea?
>>
>> Klaas Bil
>
>I’ll bite…
>
>How about having a partial clip on the interior side of the pedal? It
>would look like only one third of the clip was left. It would have to be
>much stiffer than a regular clip since it can’t ‘strap’ across.
>
>It seems like I saw something like this years ago with the exception that
>it was on the outer edge of the pedal (of a bicycle). Being on the
>interior of the pedal would allow quick escape. If you want to pull up on
>the pedal, just squeeze in to grip the clip.
>
>If it’s not going to be used, just flip the pedal over. Since its on the
>interior, it shouldn’t scrape when cornering.
>
>Doug
>
>
>


“To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has been picked
automagically from a database:” “Ebola, Omar Abdel Rahman, Pentagon”