First stage of learning.

Hi,

I’ve been told two contrasting things about learning to unicycle and I’d
like to know which is the better way of going about learning how to
unicycle.

Is it better to first start learning by seeing how far you can keep going
i.e forwards as far as possible, or is it the proper method of learning to
learn how to “rock” backwards and forwards on a uni . i.e half a turn of the
pedals forwards then half a turn backwards so the unicycle remains near the
same spot.

TIA

Ant

Learning to ride forwards is widely regarded as the first step. It is a lot easier to balance when going forwards than when rocking or idling on the spot.

Plus going forwards is definitely more useful and impressive to onlookers… you don’t need to be able to do any harder skills to whiz up the road and back, but other people won’t know that… :slight_smile:

Start by trying to go forwards; before too long you’ll be able to stay on for pretty much as long as you want, and then the world is your oyster.

Most importantly, have fun!

Phil, just me

Learn to ride forwards first. After that, learn to free-mount. You’re going to love it!

Mojoe

Absolutely definitely learn to ride forwards first. If nothing else, it has to be good for your morale. Learning to ‘rock backwards and forwards’ (idling) is a skill which can sometimes take several sessions for an experienced rider to master.

When you can ride forwards, I suggest you progress more or less as follows:

Riding forwards.
Gentle turns in each direction (try not to develop a bias towards one side)
Stopping deliberately. (Stepping off the back is widely considered to be more elegant.)

Then freemounting. This skill can take minutes or days to learn, but it is the skill which gives you the freedom to uni wherever you get the chance, and it opens up possibilities like playing hockey or basketball etc.

Then idling. I went for 15 years without learning to idle, and I did some long and difficult rides. However, I wish I had been shown how to idle 14 1/2 years earlier.

I like to draw a distinction between tricks and skills. Tricks are done for show (or fun); skills help you to be a more versatile and competent rider.

Your basic skills would then be freemounting, riding, turning, idling, and stopping. (And possibly reversing.)

We want a full progress report by next Wednesday.:wink:

Get on, look forward, ride off into the distance as far as you can go until you fall off. Get up, go back, and do it again. Keep your weight on the seat.

Re: First stage of learning.

Great, I’m glad you all you guys said learn to ride forwards first. I can
go quite some distance now which is cool but I’ve been having a go at this
idling thing and its pretty hard (harder than going forwards anyway).

Thanks for your answers.

Ant
“harper” <harper.h3qwn@timelimit.unicyclist.com> wrote in message
news:harper.h3qwn@timelimit.unicyclist.com
>
> Get on, look forward, ride off into the distance as far as you can go
> until you fall off. Get up, go back, and do it again. Keep your weight
> on the seat.
>
>
> –
> harper - Pavement Victim
>
> -Greg Harper
>
> " If it were possible I would have my uni permenately attached to my
> rear." - gerardpoche, on fashion
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> harper’s Profile: http://www.unicyclist.com/profile/426
> View this thread: http://www.unicyclist.com/thread/22737
>

Re: First stage of learning.

On Sat, 11 Jan 2003 14:29:12 -0000, “Ant” <nospam@thankyou.com> wrote:

>Is it better to first start learning by seeing how far you can keep going
>i.e forwards as far as possible, or is it the proper method of learning to
>learn how to “rock” backwards and forwards on a uni . i.e half a turn of the
>pedals forwards then half a turn backwards so the unicycle remains near the
>same spot.
If by “rock” you mean to idle, i.e. half-revolutions backward and
forward without a support, then (like all others said) learn riding
forward first. However, I was taught before riding forward, to first
hang onto a support with cranks roughly horizontal and then make small
rocking motions to get a feel for balancing.
Klaas Bil

The average length of film titles in English is 17 letters.

Re: First stage of learning.

On Sat, 11 Jan 2003 11:08:25 -0600, Mikefule
<Mikefule.h3q7m@timelimit.unicyclist.com> wrote:

>Then freemounting. This skill can take minutes or days to learn
This is true but it isn’t the full range. I needed about three months
of (on and off) practice before I could freemount reliably.

Klaas Bil

The average length of film titles in English is 17 letters.