First Coker commute

My Coker arrived on Wednesday. I put it together, fitted the air seat that
I made a few weeks ago for my muni, and planned to ride to work today if
the weather was good. Given how wet and windy it was Tuesday-Thursday it
didn’t look promising, but Friday morning dawned bright and clear so off I
jolly well went.

Frustratingly the computer stopped reading after 200yds, so I don’t
know my average speed. But from the time I took, I’d estimate it at the
high end of
7.5-8.0mph. I could improve on this a fair bit just by improving my
mounting skills.

I found mounting a lot harder than I remember it being previously when
I’ve ridden Roger’s and Sarah’s Cokers. I think I shall have to learn the
rolling mount. I also found the seatpost quite loose. I mounted a few
times only to find that the saddle had twisted and I had to start again.
Is this a common problem?

It was an interesting experience watching all the little cyclists going
past below me. All the comments I got were positive, and I managed to ride
5 miles before someone told me I’d lost a wheel. I’d just dismounted, so
had time to look around, say “No, I’m sure I haven’t”, then look at the
wheel and tell him “Nope, it’s still there”.

There’s a couple of speed bumps on the Bath-Bristol cyclepath that I was
concerned about, but they were no great problem. I just had to extend my
arms ready for takeoff. There’s also a sizeable hump used by tractors
crossing between fields on either side of (and slightly higher than) the
path, which I lay awake last night (briefly) thinking about. But the
slopes on either side turned out not to be as steep as I’d envisioned
(which I ought to have known, I cycle over it 10 times a week).

The final hill into work is fairly steep. I allowed myself one go at
riding up it (hanging onto a wall to mount), then gave up and ran the rest
of the way.

On the way home I wussed out and walked down the steepest bit of that hill
that I ran up earlier. Once I got to the cyclepath I freemounted
successfully on the second attempt - maybe my problems earlier were due to
trying to use skills requiring co-ordination before lunch (I never juggle
before lunch). Having tinkered with the sensor before I left, the computer
worked perfectly all the way home. The recorded mileage of 5.41 miles for
the route I took satisfied me as to the accuracy of the 283cm wheel
circumference that I selected from a search of past Coker threads (I
couldn’t be bothered to do a rollout when someone else had already done it
for me). I clocked a fairly respectable 9.1mph average (it was 9.4 before
I got to the hill at the end).

Many more positive comments, and on the final uphill section I was amused
by the panting and disbelieving exclamations of two kids trying (and
failing) to catch up with me on their bikes.

I think I’ll be able to make a habit of Coker commuting.


Danny Colyer (remove your.mind to reply)
http://www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/danny/danny.html “The secret of life is
honesty and fair dealing. If you can fake that, you’ve got it made” -
Groucho Marx

I was having the same problem with a new unicycle until I found that the
seat post had been coated with thin layer of protective grease. Once I
eliminated the grease on the post and in the post tube, I was fine.

Bruce

> I also found the seatpost quite loose. I mounted a few times only to
> find that the saddle had twisted and I had to start again. Is this a
> common problem?

“Danny Colyer” <danny@speedy5.freeserve.co.uk> wrote in message
news:9e3q4d$alc$2@news5.svr.pol.co.uk
> I think I’ll be able to make a habit of Coker commuting.

That’s great. I work 13KM away and I’m going to give it a try on Tuesday.
There’s currently a transit worker’s strike here in Vancouver. We have a
car but a Coker would certainly be easier on the environment!

I ride fairly slowly but I think it will take me about 1.5 hours if I
don’t stop and rest, which I probably will.

> and I managed to ride 5 miles before someone told me I’d lost a wheel.
> I’d just dismounted, so had time to look around, say "No, I’m sure I
haven’t",
> then look at the wheel and tell him “Nope, it’s still there”.
Great answer! I’m going to use it I think but I still like “It fell
behind the fridge!” I used to have a whole list of those but seem to
have misplaced
it. Searching for it on Google I found a slightly different list…about
half of the responces are the same. My favourites, and others I can
remember…

My other wheel?! Why, I don’t need a TRAINING wheel anymore! My grandma is
riding it. On my other unicycle! (I like that one, too!) This IS my other
wheel! I don’t carry a spare. (Confused) What? (fall off) Gee, you’re
right! The tire popped about half a mile back and out of frustration I
broke my bike in half. (Exasperated) That is the NINTH time I’ve heard
that one today! Don’t be daft, where would I put a second wheel? It’s on
an exchange program to France with a second wheel.

(In the case of “Hey, you lost a wheel!”) No, I found one!

Other comments… “Look! It’s a unicorn!” It took me a while to get
that one. “Can you give me a ride?” (From a drunk) “Look at the one
tricycle, Daddy!”

Also found this…
365.25 days = 1 unicycle

Graham W. Boyes

Bruce Edwards wrote:
> I was having the same problem with a new unicycle until I found that the
seat
> post had been coated with thin layer of protective grease. Once I
eliminated
> the grease on the post and in the post tube, I was fine.

Thanks for the suggestion. The seatpost felt dry enough, but I gave it a
wipe with kitchen roll and I certainly had fewer problems today. I think
I’ll talk to Roger about seatpost clamps at Eurocycle though (I’ll see how
I get on with the stock one until then).

I found today’s ride much easier, and increased my average to 9.7mph
(still plenty of room for improvement there). I rode up the hill that I
ran up last week, and rode down it this evening.

I decided on the way home that the seatpost could do with putting up 1/2"
or so, but found that would take me past the insertion limit line. There’s
always the third seatpost, the one that looks like it was made for Tall
Paul, but that’s much too long. Maybe I’ll take a hacksaw to it sometime.

<tongue in cheek> I’ve found a health disadvantage to unicycling. There
was a post on alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent a few weeks ago headed “Breast
Eyed Men Live Longer” (I’ll quote it under my .sig for anyone who’s
interested). Seems obvious really, although the study would never work
because it’d be impossible to find a heterosexual control group.

Anyway, I no longer have a particularly useable upright bike. I’m always
on either my recumbent or a unicycle. Which means that people look at me.
Now that we’ve reached the time of year when the girls are out on their
bikes, bent over their handlebars in low cut tops, it’s hard for me to
have a surreptitious ogle when they’re looking at me! So I’m not getting
the health benefits of ogling. Though I feel sure that if my wife realised
this she’d approve that much more of my less conventional machines.
</tongue in cheek>


Danny Colyer (remove your.mind to reply)
http://www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/danny/danny.html “The secret of life is
honesty and fair dealing. If you can fake that, you’ve got it made” -
Groucho Marx

Breast Eyed Men Live Longer (previously posted to
alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent) Disclaimer: A woman passed this note along to
me so don’t think I’m being sexist:

An Eyeful a day keeps the doctor away By Jonathan Hayter

STARING at women’s breasts is good for men’s health and makes them live
longer, a new survey reveals.

Researchers have discovered that a 10-minute ogle at women’s breasts is as
healthy as a half-an-hour in the gym.

A five-year study of 200 men found that those who enjoyed a longing look
at busty beauties had lower blood pressure, less heart disease and slower
pulse rates compared to those who did not get their daily eyeful.

Dr. Karen Weatherby, who carried out the German study, wrote in the New
England Journal of Medicine: "Just 10 minutes of staring at the
charms of a well endowed female is roughly equivalent to a 30-minute
aerobics workout.

"Sexual excitement gets the heart pumping and improves blood circulation.

"There is no question that gazing at breasts makes men healthier.

"Our study indicates that engaging in this activity a few minutes daily
cuts the risk of a stroke and heart attack in half.

“We believe that by doing so consistently, the average man can extend his
life four to five years.”

Danny Colyer <danny@speedy5.freeserve.co.uk> wrote:
> Thanks for the suggestion. The seatpost felt dry enough, but I gave it a
> wipe with kitchen roll and I certainly had fewer problems today. I think
> I’ll talk to Roger about seatpost clamps at Eurocycle though (I’ll see
> how I get on with the stock one until then).

Danny - the first thing I did with my Coker was to get a replacement
seat-clamp `cos the one which came with it was rather flimsy - 3GBP for an
Odessey clamp from Hlfrds. Lovely and snug. I know that Rog. is selling
a double clamp affair at a reasonable price - should be even better.

> I decided on the way home that the seatpost could do with putting up
> 1/2" or so, but found that would take me past the insertion limit line.
> There’s always the third seatpost, the one that looks like it was made
> for Tall Paul, but that’s much too long. Maybe I’ll take a hacksaw to it
> sometime.

It’s not that long honest - even I needed this longest seatpost. That
was, until I bought a Miyata at Red Bull last year which I needed to cut
down a little.

Tip - don’t use a hacksaw - use a pipe-cutter. Far less effort and a much
neater finish.


Paul Selwood paul@vimes.u-net.com http://www.vimes.u-net.com

Danny wrote:

> Bruce Edwards wrote:
> > I was having the same problem with a new unicycle until I found
> > that the
> seat
> > post had been coated with thin layer of protective grease. Once I
> eliminated
> > the grease on the post and in the post tube, I was fine.
>
> Thanks for the suggestion. The seatpost felt dry enough, but I gave it
> a wipe with kitchen roll and I certainly had fewer problems today. I
> think I’ll talk to Roger about seatpost clamps at Eurocycle though
> (I’ll see how
I
> get on with the stock one until then).

The double bolt BMX ones work great, remind me closer to the time and I
will be sure to bring one.

> I found today’s ride much easier, and increased my average to 9.7mph
(still
> plenty of room for improvement there). I rode up the hill that I ran up
> last week, and rode down it this evening.

It increases all the time, I am communting to all my swimming sessions at
the moment in training for Red Bull, only 4 or 5 miles but better than
nothing. Last week I was averaging 11.0mph… Yersterday I average
14.8mph (and this was after 1.5 hours hard swim and it was up hill! and no
red bull!).

Roger

On 24 May 2001 14:20:11 -0700, Roger@unicycle.uk.com (Roger) wrote:

>Yersterday I average 14.8mph (and this was after 1.5 hours hard swim and
>it was up hill! and no red bull!).
>
>Roger
>
Is that a typo (not the yersterday I mean…)?

Klaas Bil

“To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has been picked
automagically from a database:” “Pretty Good Privacy, marijuana, killed”

Yes, it should be “Red Bull”…

Most of the time on the ride I was above 16mph, so giving an average of
almost 15mph.

Roger

----- Original Message ----- From: “Klaas Bil”
<klaasbil_remove_the_spamkiller_@xs4all.nl> To: <unicycling@winternet.com>
Sent: Wednesday, May 30, 2001 10:36 PM Subject: Re: Second Coker commute
(was Re: First Coker commute)

> On 24 May 2001 14:20:11 -0700, Roger@unicycle.uk.com (Roger) wrote:
>
>
> >Yersterday I average 14.8mph (and this was after 1.5 hours hard swim
> >and it was up hill! and no red bull!).
> >
> >Roger
> >
> Is that a typo (not the yersterday I mean…)?
>
> Klaas Bil
> –
> "To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has
> been picked
automagically from a database:"
> “Pretty Good Privacy, marijuana, killed”

Yes, it should be “Red Bull”…

Most of the time on the ride I was above 16mph, so giving an average of
almost 15mph.

Roger

----- Original Message ----- From: “Klaas Bil”
<klaasbil_remove_the_spamkiller_@xs4all.nl> To: <unicycling@winternet.com>
Sent: Wednesday, May 30, 2001 10:36 PM Subject: Re: Second Coker commute
(was Re: First Coker commute)

> On 24 May 2001 14:20:11 -0700, Roger@unicycle.uk.com (Roger) wrote:
>
>
> >Yersterday I average 14.8mph (and this was after 1.5 hours hard swim
> >and it was up hill! and no red bull!).
> >
> >Roger
> >
> Is that a typo (not the yersterday I mean…)?
>
> Klaas Bil
> –
> "To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has
> been picked
automagically from a database:"
> “Pretty Good Privacy, marijuana, killed”

“Roger Davies” <Roger.Davies@Octacon.Co.Uk> wrote in message
news:002c01c0e99c$80306880$0b5bfe3e@p400
> Yes, it should be “Red Bull”…
>
> Most of the time on the ride I was above 16mph, so giving an average of
> almost 15mph.
>
> Roger

Eeeek. I averaged about 9 mph for my training ride yesterday. Although
that was 30 miles on towpath including a couple of rests. How on earth
do you people go so fast? I can only get my Coker up to about 14 in a
real hurry. I guess short cranks give a mile or two extra, but I don’t
think I’d be anywhere near averaging >12mph. My feet just don’t want to
turn so fast.

I also find that I can only ride with my feet in proper cycling position
on very flat ground, as soon as I’m going over any bumps / potholes etc. I
have to put the centre of my feet on the pedals to get the extra leverage
to get out of holes.

I’m guessing the answer to getting more speed is something along the lines
of a) get shorter cranks and b) not being totally unfit really helps.

Part b) isn’t too much of a problem as I’m doing loads of exercise and
getting much better at the moment. I’m very tempted by new cranks,
especially as I’m going to be doing a longer commute soon, but I think
I’ll have control problems with them.

Joe

“Roger Davies” <Roger.Davies@Octacon.Co.Uk> wrote in message
news:002c01c0e99c$80306880$0b5bfe3e@p400
> Yes, it should be “Red Bull”…
>
> Most of the time on the ride I was above 16mph, so giving an average of
> almost 15mph.
>
> Roger

Eeeek. I averaged about 9 mph for my training ride yesterday. Although
that was 30 miles on towpath including a couple of rests. How on earth
do you people go so fast? I can only get my Coker up to about 14 in a
real hurry. I guess short cranks give a mile or two extra, but I don’t
think I’d be anywhere near averaging >12mph. My feet just don’t want to
turn so fast.

I also find that I can only ride with my feet in proper cycling position
on very flat ground, as soon as I’m going over any bumps / potholes etc. I
have to put the centre of my feet on the pedals to get the extra leverage
to get out of holes.

I’m guessing the answer to getting more speed is something along the lines
of a) get shorter cranks and b) not being totally unfit really helps.

Part b) isn’t too much of a problem as I’m doing loads of exercise and
getting much better at the moment. I’m very tempted by new cranks,
especially as I’m going to be doing a longer commute soon, but I think
I’ll have control problems with them.

Joe

I do ride with very short cranks, 110mm This gives a lot higher average.
It does not I believe give you a max top speed, Gilby can ride faster than
I can in a sprint on 150mm cranks.

I do fall off occasionally when I am caught out on bad bumps, but rarely,
I think this is why you need the long cranks for the really high speeds -
it gives you some torque for corrections. I do ride with the balls of my
feet on the pedals and when I am really rolling well it feels as if the
pedals are just being moved by twitched of my toes - funny feeling really.

Short cranks have another advantage, they are less hard on your body. They
help with sore Achilles tendons and also with bad knees because the leg
movement is less.

Roger

                     The UK's Unicycle Source
                   <a href="http://www.unicycle.uk.com/">http://www.unicycle.uk.com/</a>

----- Original Message ----- From: “Joe Marshall”
<joe_marshall@bigfoot.com> To: <unicycling@winternet.com> Sent:
Thursday, May 31, 2001 11:10 AM Subject: going really fast (was Re:
Second Coker commute)

> “Roger Davies” <Roger.Davies@Octacon.Co.Uk> wrote in message
> news:002c01c0e99c$80306880$0b5bfe3e@p400
> > Yes, it should be “Red Bull”…
> >
> > Most of the time on the ride I was above 16mph, so giving an average
> > of almost 15mph.
> >
> > Roger
>
> Eeeek. I averaged about 9 mph for my training ride yesterday. Although
that
> was 30 miles on towpath including a couple of rests. How on earth do
> you people go so fast? I can only get my Coker up to about 14 in a
> real hurry.
I
> guess short cranks give a mile or two extra, but I don’t think I’d be
> anywhere near averaging >12mph. My feet just don’t want to turn so fast.
>
> I also find that I can only ride with my feet in proper cycling position
on
> very flat ground, as soon as I’m going over any bumps / potholes etc. I
have
> to put the centre of my feet on the pedals to get the extra leverage to
get
> out of holes.
>
> I’m guessing the answer to getting more speed is something along
> the lines of a) get shorter cranks and b) not being totally unfit
> really helps.
>
> Part b) isn’t too much of a problem as I’m doing loads of exercise and
> getting much better at the moment. I’m very tempted by new cranks,
> especially as I’m going to be doing a longer commute soon, but I think
I’ll
> have control problems with them.
>
> Joe

I do ride with very short cranks, 110mm This gives a lot higher average.
It does not I believe give you a max top speed, Gilby can ride faster than
I can in a sprint on 150mm cranks.

I do fall off occasionally when I am caught out on bad bumps, but rarely,
I think this is why you need the long cranks for the really high speeds -
it gives you some torque for corrections. I do ride with the balls of my
feet on the pedals and when I am really rolling well it feels as if the
pedals are just being moved by twitched of my toes - funny feeling really.

Short cranks have another advantage, they are less hard on your body. They
help with sore Achilles tendons and also with bad knees because the leg
movement is less.

Roger

                     The UK's Unicycle Source
                   <a href="http://www.unicycle.uk.com/">http://www.unicycle.uk.com/</a>

----- Original Message ----- From: “Joe Marshall”
<joe_marshall@bigfoot.com> To: <unicycling@winternet.com> Sent:
Thursday, May 31, 2001 11:10 AM Subject: going really fast (was Re:
Second Coker commute)

> “Roger Davies” <Roger.Davies@Octacon.Co.Uk> wrote in message
> news:002c01c0e99c$80306880$0b5bfe3e@p400
> > Yes, it should be “Red Bull”…
> >
> > Most of the time on the ride I was above 16mph, so giving an average
> > of almost 15mph.
> >
> > Roger
>
> Eeeek. I averaged about 9 mph for my training ride yesterday. Although
that
> was 30 miles on towpath including a couple of rests. How on earth do
> you people go so fast? I can only get my Coker up to about 14 in a
> real hurry.
I
> guess short cranks give a mile or two extra, but I don’t think I’d be
> anywhere near averaging >12mph. My feet just don’t want to turn so fast.
>
> I also find that I can only ride with my feet in proper cycling position
on
> very flat ground, as soon as I’m going over any bumps / potholes etc. I
have
> to put the centre of my feet on the pedals to get the extra leverage to
get
> out of holes.
>
> I’m guessing the answer to getting more speed is something along
> the lines of a) get shorter cranks and b) not being totally unfit
> really helps.
>
> Part b) isn’t too much of a problem as I’m doing loads of exercise and
> getting much better at the moment. I’m very tempted by new cranks,
> especially as I’m going to be doing a longer commute soon, but I think
I’ll
> have control problems with them.
>
> Joe

I do ride with very short cranks, 110mm This gives a lot higher average.
It does not I believe give you a max top speed, Gilby can ride faster than
I can in a sprint on 150mm cranks.

I do fall off occasionally when I am caught out on bad bumps, but rarely,
I think this is why you need the long cranks for the really high speeds -
it gives you some torque for corrections. I do ride with the balls of my
feet on the pedals and when I am really rolling well it feels as if the
pedals are just being moved by twitched of my toes - funny feeling really.

Short cranks have another advantage, they are less hard on your body. They
help with sore Achilles tendons and also with bad knees because the leg
movement is less.

Roger

                     The UK's Unicycle Source
                   <a href="http://www.unicycle.uk.com/">http://www.unicycle.uk.com/</a>

----- Original Message ----- From: “Joe Marshall”
<joe_marshall@bigfoot.com> To: <unicycling@winternet.com> Sent:
Thursday, May 31, 2001 11:10 AM Subject: going really fast (was Re:
Second Coker commute)

> “Roger Davies” <Roger.Davies@Octacon.Co.Uk> wrote in message
> news:002c01c0e99c$80306880$0b5bfe3e@p400
> > Yes, it should be “Red Bull”…
> >
> > Most of the time on the ride I was above 16mph, so giving an average
> > of almost 15mph.
> >
> > Roger
>
> Eeeek. I averaged about 9 mph for my training ride yesterday. Although
that
> was 30 miles on towpath including a couple of rests. How on earth do
> you people go so fast? I can only get my Coker up to about 14 in a
> real hurry.
I
> guess short cranks give a mile or two extra, but I don’t think I’d be
> anywhere near averaging >12mph. My feet just don’t want to turn so fast.
>
> I also find that I can only ride with my feet in proper cycling position
on
> very flat ground, as soon as I’m going over any bumps / potholes etc. I
have
> to put the centre of my feet on the pedals to get the extra leverage to
get
> out of holes.
>
> I’m guessing the answer to getting more speed is something along
> the lines of a) get shorter cranks and b) not being totally unfit
> really helps.
>
> Part b) isn’t too much of a problem as I’m doing loads of exercise and
> getting much better at the moment. I’m very tempted by new cranks,
> especially as I’m going to be doing a longer commute soon, but I think
I’ll
> have control problems with them.
>
> Joe

Very tempting. Maybe I should try it. With the 150s I am averaging up to
12.2mph over 6.5 miles (not all smooth cruising), with a max of 18.5mph.
The hill to/from my house is measured at 23% grade though, so I bet
that will be really hard with shorter cranks. At 18mph I have started
to feel the feeling you’re talking about - the up/down twitching rather
than a circular pattern. Very cool. It requires being perfectly in the
groove, but maybe that happens easier with the shorter cranks. Maybe
I’ll do 125s in the summer and 150s in the winter when I am riding
after dark and need all the torque advantage I can get just to keep
from crashing. So that says I want something like those variable tandem
cranks Daniel used to have on his Rock Shok Muni - anyone have a
current supplier for them? The shortest setting might not be short
enough though.

Joe mentioned being that “not being totally unfit” really helps with Coker
riding. I can tell you, Roger is not totally unfit!

—Nathan

“Roger” <Roger@unicycle.uk.com> wrote in message
news:003e01c0e9c4$0e215060$0b5bfe3e@p400
> I do ride with very short cranks, 110mm This gives a lot higher average.
It
> does not I believe give you a max top speed, Gilby can ride faster than
> I can in a sprint on 150mm cranks.
>
> I do fall off occasionally when I am caught out on bad bumps, but
> rarely,
I
> think this is why you need the long cranks for the really high speeds -
> it gives you some torque for corrections. I do ride with the balls of my
feet
> on the pedals and when I am really rolling well it feels as if
> the pedals are just being moved by twitched of my toes - funny
> feeling really.
>
> Short cranks have another advantage, they are less hard on your body.
They
> help with sore Achilles tendons and also with bad knees because the leg
> movement is less.
>
> Roger

Very tempting. Maybe I should try it. With the 150s I am averaging up to
12.2mph over 6.5 miles (not all smooth cruising), with a max of 18.5mph.
The hill to/from my house is measured at 23% grade though, so I bet
that will be really hard with shorter cranks. At 18mph I have started
to feel the feeling you’re talking about - the up/down twitching rather
than a circular pattern. Very cool. It requires being perfectly in the
groove, but maybe that happens easier with the shorter cranks. Maybe
I’ll do 125s in the summer and 150s in the winter when I am riding
after dark and need all the torque advantage I can get just to keep
from crashing. So that says I want something like those variable tandem
cranks Daniel used to have on his Rock Shok Muni - anyone have a
current supplier for them? The shortest setting might not be short
enough though.

Joe mentioned being that “not being totally unfit” really helps with Coker
riding. I can tell you, Roger is not totally unfit!

—Nathan

“Roger” <Roger@unicycle.uk.com> wrote in message
news:003e01c0e9c4$0e215060$0b5bfe3e@p400
> I do ride with very short cranks, 110mm This gives a lot higher average.
It
> does not I believe give you a max top speed, Gilby can ride faster than
> I can in a sprint on 150mm cranks.
>
> I do fall off occasionally when I am caught out on bad bumps, but
> rarely,
I
> think this is why you need the long cranks for the really high speeds -
> it gives you some torque for corrections. I do ride with the balls of my
feet
> on the pedals and when I am really rolling well it feels as if
> the pedals are just being moved by twitched of my toes - funny
> feeling really.
>
> Short cranks have another advantage, they are less hard on your body.
They
> help with sore Achilles tendons and also with bad knees because the leg
> movement is less.
>
> Roger

Very tempting. Maybe I should try it. With the 150s I am averaging up to
12.2mph over 6.5 miles (not all smooth cruising), with a max of 18.5mph.
The hill to/from my house is measured at 23% grade though, so I bet
that will be really hard with shorter cranks. At 18mph I have started
to feel the feeling you’re talking about - the up/down twitching rather
than a circular pattern. Very cool. It requires being perfectly in the
groove, but maybe that happens easier with the shorter cranks. Maybe
I’ll do 125s in the summer and 150s in the winter when I am riding
after dark and need all the torque advantage I can get just to keep
from crashing. So that says I want something like those variable tandem
cranks Daniel used to have on his Rock Shok Muni - anyone have a
current supplier for them? The shortest setting might not be short
enough though.

Joe mentioned being that “not being totally unfit” really helps with Coker
riding. I can tell you, Roger is not totally unfit!

—Nathan

“Roger” <Roger@unicycle.uk.com> wrote in message
news:003e01c0e9c4$0e215060$0b5bfe3e@p400
> I do ride with very short cranks, 110mm This gives a lot higher average.
It
> does not I believe give you a max top speed, Gilby can ride faster than
> I can in a sprint on 150mm cranks.
>
> I do fall off occasionally when I am caught out on bad bumps, but
> rarely,
I
> think this is why you need the long cranks for the really high speeds -
> it gives you some torque for corrections. I do ride with the balls of my
feet
> on the pedals and when I am really rolling well it feels as if
> the pedals are just being moved by twitched of my toes - funny
> feeling really.
>
> Short cranks have another advantage, they are less hard on your body.
They
> help with sore Achilles tendons and also with bad knees because the leg
> movement is less.
>
> Roger

Very tempting. Maybe I should try it. With the 150s I am averaging up to
12.2mph over 6.5 miles (not all smooth cruising), with a max of 18.5mph.
The hill to/from my house is measured at 23% grade though, so I bet
that will be really hard with shorter cranks. At 18mph I have started
to feel the feeling you’re talking about - the up/down twitching rather
than a circular pattern. Very cool. It requires being perfectly in the
groove, but maybe that happens easier with the shorter cranks. Maybe
I’ll do 125s in the summer and 150s in the winter when I am riding
after dark and need all the torque advantage I can get just to keep
from crashing. So that says I want something like those variable tandem
cranks Daniel used to have on his Rock Shok Muni - anyone have a
current supplier for them? The shortest setting might not be short
enough though.

Joe mentioned being that “not being totally unfit” really helps with Coker
riding. I can tell you, Roger is not totally unfit!

—Nathan

“Roger” <Roger@unicycle.uk.com> wrote in message
news:003e01c0e9c4$0e215060$0b5bfe3e@p400
> I do ride with very short cranks, 110mm This gives a lot higher average.
It
> does not I believe give you a max top speed, Gilby can ride faster than
> I can in a sprint on 150mm cranks.
>
> I do fall off occasionally when I am caught out on bad bumps, but
> rarely,
I
> think this is why you need the long cranks for the really high speeds -
> it gives you some torque for corrections. I do ride with the balls of my
feet
> on the pedals and when I am really rolling well it feels as if
> the pedals are just being moved by twitched of my toes - funny
> feeling really.
>
> Short cranks have another advantage, they are less hard on your body.
They
> help with sore Achilles tendons and also with bad knees because the leg
> movement is less.
>
> Roger

Roger@unicycle.uk.com writes:
>I do ride with very short cranks, 110mm This gives a lot higher average.
>It does not I believe give you a max top speed, Gilby can ride faster
>than I can in a sprint on 150mm cranks.
I switched from 150s to 125s (6" to 5") recently and saw my average and
max speeds go up about 10%. With the 150s, I was typically maxing out at
14mph and averaging 11-12 mph on straightaways. With the 125s, I average
13-14mph on straight paths for at least 30 minutes (that’s my commute),
with tops speeds often in the 16-17mph range (on downhills).
>
>I do fall off occasionally when I am caught out on bad bumps, but
>rarely, I think this is why you need the long cranks for the really high
>speeds - it gives you some torque for corrections. I do ride with the
>balls of my feet on the pedals and when I am really rolling well it
>feels as if the pedals are just being moved by twitched of my toes -
>funny feeling really.
Yeah, longer cranks are great for building up that initial speed and for
correcting errors, turning sharply, and quick decelerations. Switching to
the 125s took about 20 miles of getting used to – and it’s taken hundreds
of miles for me to feel comfortable pulling off certain kinds of moves and
going down pne particularly steep hill. On the 150s, these were no
problem. It’s also harder to mount with the 125s.
>
>Short cranks have another advantage, they are less hard on your body.
>They help with sore Achilles tendons and also with bad knees because the
>leg movement is less.
I noticed a pronounced reduction in knee pain when I switched down to the
125s.

I’d love to try 110s for straight riding, but since I have to tackle about
a mile’s worth of city traffic, I think I’ll hold off on getting 110s on
MY Coker.
>

Two more things:
>

Joe M wrote:
>
>>
>> Eeeek. I averaged about 9 mph for my training ride yesterday. Although
>that was 30 miles on towpath including a couple of rests. How on
>earth do you
>> people go so fast? I can only get my Coker up to about 14 in a real
>hurry. I guess short cranks give a mile or two extra, but I don’t
>think I’d be
>> anywhere near averaging >12mph. My feet just don’t want to turn so
>> fast. I also find that I can only ride with my feet in proper cycling
>> position
>on very flat ground, as soon as I’m going over any bumps / potholes etc.
>I have to put the centre of my feet on the pedals to get the extra
>leverage to get out of holes.
Center of your feet on the pedals. This sounds like a terrible idea. No
wonder you have trouble keeping up the high speeds.
>
>>
>> I’m guessing the answer to getting more speed is something along the
>lines
>> of a) get shorter cranks and b) not being totally unfit really helps.
Yes, fitness helps, and it comes with riding a lot, so before long this
won’t be a big concern! I have had to tighten belts since I began riding
to work (19 miles a day) just a 10 weeks ago.
>
>>
>> Part b) isn’t too much of a problem as I’m doing loads of exercise and
>> getting much better at the moment. I’m very tempted by new cranks,
>> especially as I’m going to be doing a longer commute soon, but I think
>I’ll have control problems with them.
As I said, you will for awhile. But you get used to it. Just be safe.
>
>>
>> Joe

> I noticed a pronounced reduction in knee pain when I switched down to
> the 125s.

Ditto! Also,I believe less friction in the saddle with short cranks = less
saddle soreness 8^)

-Mark