First aid and unicycling

I’m woundering how many of you have first aid training and carry a kit when your rideing?

I have two, one is smale for around town and covers cuts and scrapes the other is larger for muni/climbing/kayaking,
both fit in a hydration pack and are easy to carry around.

Would you know what to do if your friend was out cold or cut badly?

Dave

Re: First aid and unicycling

“Ottawa Dave” <Ottawa.Dave@NoEmail.Message.Poster.at.Unicyclist.com> writes:

> I’m woundering how many of you have first aid training and carry a kit
> when your rideing?
>

My first aid kit comprises a roll of sports tape. That’s it, except
for items that may be creatively used for improvised purposes (can you
sling a dislocated shoulder with a MUni tire?). Short of bigger
equipment (e.g. SAM splint), I can’t think of other items that are
useful enough to be worth carrying.

> Would you know what to do if your friend was out cold or cut badly?

Out cold is a serious situation. I’d check for respiration and
position my friend for safety if necessary and send for help.

Cut badly, I’d clean the wound with water (thorough rinsing is as good
as ointments), close it with tape, torn T-shirt, strap from Camelbak,
etc. Then assist back for help. Judgement is required, for severe
cases I’d assess whether moving the friend might make matters worse
than the delay caused by going for help.

Ken

Yesterday on the trail, Jess Riegel had occasion to dig into his Jack Hughes’ “Ouch Pouch.” A handy little thing to have I’m sure, though I don’t know what’s in it. Jess had taken a hard fall onto some pointy rocks here (two bottom pix):


or http://www.unicycling.com/muni/muni98/pix/kriscliffb.jpg
One or two of the rocks seemed to do what they’re always so good at, found the gap between two of the pads in his 661s and gave him a nice cut on his upper shin (and a bruise on his knee). Nobody wants to finish a day of riding with a cut under their pads. Fortunately the Ouch Pouch had at least one band-aid in there, to keep the friction away from the cut!

A small first aid kit is a real good idea for trail riding, especially if your trails include sharp rocks like ours do. I’m not sure what belongs in there, but band-aids and tape make a good start.

This is interesting lots of looks but not many comments.
Lets build a kit, we have - tape
- bandaides
I’ll add - triangle bandges
there good for slinging arms,
suporting dislocated shoulders
and splinting stuff.
Also a tick puller for Memphis Mud

I’m going to align with Ken Cline here… a roll of tape can be used in most non-critical situations, along with a little “MacGyver” type ingenuity. I have a small kit in the car, but it doesn’t need to come with me on the trail…

If it bleeds, tape it. If skin’s missing, one can improvise a band-aid with tape. If something’s dislocated, tape it. If something non-critical is broken, sling it with a t-shirt and tape it. The alcohol swab / neosporin / gauze is in the truck, usually no more than an hour away…

Of course, if an injury is serious then one must stabilize the victim and seek professional help, but my riding partners and I always wear lots of protective gear when we do any sort of serious riding… it’s highly unlikely anyone would get knocked out cold with a good snug helmet, and some degree of “knowing one’s limits”… we’re on unicycles, ferchrissakes, it’s nearly impossible to get going very fast!

The only time I find myself pushing my limits is during urban trials riding… in this setting I usually see a police officer / paramedic / fire truck passing by every 15 mins. or so; I’m never worried about finding help.

I realize a good Boy Scout is always prepared for any situation, but a good Muni Scout knows how to pack light and ride fast :slight_smile:

Super Glue! The stuff works wonders in closing wounds. I ripped my scalp with a low branch while on a gentle urban jaunt and avoided a day of my vacation and gads of emergency room expenses by simplying gluing the 2 inch, to the skull, tear in my head. Since I’m bald the fact that there was no scar adds to the benifits of Super Glue.

Tommy

I carry a first aid kit in a SPAM shaped tupperware(which fits nicely in my Camelbak. I basically took a small first aid kit and organised it to fit in the SPAM container. It’s got band-aids of all sizes, gause, some medical tape, iodine and saline pads, little scissors and all sorts of junk for nearly every injury you could recieve on the trail…

Oh, and I am certified in CPR…

I carry a basic mini first aid kit by Johnson & Johnson. I put a few extras in there. It’s mostly band aids and antiseptic. I need to add some tweezers but I keep forgetting. I could remember right now and walk over to the 24 hour Walgreens about two blocks away before I forget again. Tweezers would be handy. I’ve gotten splinters while out riding and it would be handy to be able to pull them out.

:: me goes out and walks over to Walgreens ::

First Aid Kit

kit.jpg

What can you fix with a seat post? :smiley:

I carry about 18 inches of duct tape folded up into a square. I tuck mine in the belt loop of the multi-tool I carry in my camelback. And on girl scout trips I give a square to each of the chaperones. They’re in my car, in coat pockets, first-aid kits… They take up no room at all.

It makes pretty good band-aids. Also, still that wobbly seat, cover that blister, fix those broken glasses, patch that hole in canoe, keep that broken spoke from flopping around, make emergency shoelaces, chin straps, strap sticks around a broken ankle, make a headband strap for a kneck injury (careful here, best answer is send for help, don’t move victim), …

I’ve actually used it for everything in the above paragraph exept the broken ankle or injured neck (but I’m ready).

We’re talking “get you out of the woods” fixes. Emergency repair not permanent.

Greatest little tool kit out there. Won’t fix everything, but more than most or its size. Diminsions: 1-1/2" x 1-1/2" x 1/8"

Designer colors available too. (I use red or grey mostly)

I’ve got a little first aid kit, which I’ve never really used other than for plasters. I generally work on the basis that it’ll be easier to sort an injury (minor cut) out straight away rather than bleeding all over my clothes. Blood’s a bugger to wash out.

Just a thought with tape - is that not potentially really painful wen you come to tear the tape off? Could that not make any wound worse?

As a final note, those antiseptic wipes are pants for disenficting anything, they just make it look nice. You want a high pressure jet of water. Roll up a camelback, point at the cut and squeeze.

John

One can improvise a pain-free bandage by placing a small square of tape upside-down over the wound before taping the area. This will ensure the adhesive does not come in contact with a sensitive area.

My friend acctaully wrapped duct tape all around his cut leg. He ended up waiting untill it finally fell off by itself.

Re: First aid and unicycling

I would immediately search them for a wallet and other valuables. Then, I would leave them there (always stay in the same place so someone can find you) and cover my tracks as well as possible. Hopefully, they would remain unconscious long enough for me to come up with a suitable alibi.

ding

It takes this sort of reasoning to be able to use duct tape for every emergency. Where there’s duct tape, there’s a way.

it’s what’s inside the seatpost that counts.

Re: Re: First aid and unicycling

Ya just gotta love thinking outside the box;)

Re: First aid and unicycling

“maestro8” <maestro8@NoEmail.Message.Poster.at.Unicyclist.com> writes:

> > Just a thought with tape - is that not potentially really painful wen
> > you come to tear the tape off? Could that not make any wound worse?

>
> One can improvise a pain-free bandage by placing a small square of tape
> upside-down over the wound before taping the area. This will ensure the
> adhesive does not come in contact with a sensitive area.

That’s one good solution.

I’ve never had a problem treating minor cuts and scrapes with sports
tape. The adhesive is strong, but the temporary pain of tearing out
hair is usually the biggest problem.

For deep wounds, you can tear the tape into thin strips or butterfly
bandage shapes to hold the skin together while still leaving most of
the area untaped. Other items can be use as absorbent padding over
that and taped in place for light compression.

A product I highly, HIGHLY recommend is Spenco 2nd Skin moist burn
pads, which can be taped over cuts, abrasions, burns, blisters,
etc. to pad, protect, and speed healing. I don’t carry these in my
own unicycling kit because I don’t tend to ride far from civilization
(typically no more that 2-3 hours) and can re-bandage when I get off
the trail. It is a staple in my climbing first aid kit. 2nd Skin
plus athletic tape can patch road rash so well all you notice is the
tape tugging on your skin as the injury heals underneath.

Ken

my muni 1st aid kit genneraly has most of the following at the start of a ride.
sterile dressing/s with bandage attached
sterile dressing pad/s (no bandage)
antiseptic wipes ( good for cleaning up leaking blood so you don;t scare the natives)
roll of PVC tape (to hold on any dressing under muni conditions, or tape fingers together or fix other things)
some steri strips for pulling together gashes.
water sterilisation tablets
trianglular bandage
tampon (its a good sterile plug for gun shot wounds)
Anti histimine cream or spray (Paul and I both react badly to horse fly bites)

The thing that gets used the most is the tape and dressing pads
I’ve never yet had to plug a gunshot wound, but you never can tell whos around the corner. the tiny tiny kit that lives in my back pack for day to day commuting only has a dressing, some plasters and a wipe.

Sarah