Elementary ballistics...

So today I got my new 110 mm cranks, put them on the Nimbus II 20, then put the 125s on the Coker, in place of the 150s…

Rode the length of the 2.5 km rowing lake at the National Watersports Centre, into a strong wind, then back down the other side with the wind. I was riding in calm air… literally as fast as the wind, and sweating like a sweaty thing. I guess I hit 20 mph.

Then in a burst of enthusiasm on a quiet residential road on my way back to the car, I went for it big time…

Gosh! Don’t things happen quickly at speed? I hit the ground faster than I can run, did a belly flop onto the tarmac, and slid in perfect ‘body surfing’ pose for several yards. Palms ripped out of my gloves, but hands unhurt. I’ve always said gloves are vital protective gear.

No knee pads or elbow pads. Never having ridden faster than I can run before, I have never had this type of UPD before. Now I have no knees or elbows to pad. Problem solved!

It’s awesome, but the speed can be hypnotic. I was always happy to plod on the Coker with 150s. With 125s, it keeps saying, ‘Faster, faster…’.

Dancing all day tomorrow in white dress shirt and white trousers… and I have leaky elbows and knees.

Mike

Mike, you’re a poet and a master of simile!

But OUCH! Please do be careful out there! (Have as much fun as possible without actually dying or crippling yourself.)

Sounds like you Coker the way I used to ski.

Makes me a little afraid that I want a Coker… but not too afraid to keep wanting one.

I had my new Coker delivered to the office which came today so took it home at lunch to ride. Didn’t take too long to nail the freemount and then I was off for trips around the block. I didn’t exactly ride like the wind but I did sweat like a sweaty thing. Cornering’s a bit shaky yet but it’ll come.

I had in mind a recent thread about being embarrassed to ride in public when just learning. The thread’s conversation must have helped because I swallowed my pride and went for it. Sure did get a lot of smiles and the promise of one mother to bring her 12 yr. old twins by our next club meeting when I stopped to rest and talk for a minute. Is there an official Coker club? I wonder what the initiation rites are like.

Lunch hours are too short. Back at work now and waiting for 5:00 to come so I can get back home to my new toy.

Bruce

You DO want a Coker. Keep watching this shiny pendulum… You do want a Coker, you are feeling drowsy, you do want a Coker, when I click my fingers you will get off your posterior and order a Coker… Click!

I have ridden 20, 24 and 26 inch unis and various giraffes. Nothing is like a Coker except possibly a penny farthing (which I have also ridden). It’s in a league of its own.

When I bought my Coker, I was freemounting my 20 about 80% and my 26 about 50%. I took me only 7 attempts to mount the Coker first time, and I was riding it almost immediately. Today I put the shorter cranks on and I haven’t missed a mount (out of approx 6 on the ride.) Until today, I have never had an absolute wipe out disaster type long range intercontinental ballistic UPD, and have usually remained on my feet. Cokers ain’t difficult or dangerous. Algebra is difficult, and prats who rev out on tarmac when wearing shorts and no pads are dangerous. (Ahem!)

Buy one, you know you want to. :wink:

Slow down a bit for the corner, then counter-steer: just twist the wheel a bit to the left and it will naturally fall into the position to turn right. And vice versa. By careful about very sharp turns on rough surfaces and grass as I’ve heard tales of the wheel twisting as the tyre grips and the forks turn without the wheel. never happened to me.

The wheel will go out of true fairly quickly. I paid about 17 GBQ to get mine trued and it’s been OK ever since.

Fantastic machine. Have fun on it.

Ah, counter steering as from my old motorcycle days. I’ll have to try that tonight.

Hopefully the new Deluxe rim will hold true better than the stock steel rims. I’ve folded a Coker wheel too and it’s not a happy time.

Bruce

Re: Elementary ballistics…

On Fri, 13 Sep 2002 13:54:32 -0500, Mikefule
<Mikefule.axn2n@timelimit.unicyclist.com> wrote:

>When I bought my Coker, I was freemounting my 20 about 80% and my 26
>about 50%. I took me only 7 attempts to mount the Coker first time, and
>I was riding it almost immediately. Today I put the shorter cranks on
>and I haven’t missed a mount (out of approx 6 on the ride.)

That is heartening. I am vaguely considering to buy a distance
unicycle by next summer (can do with the MUni till then!). But I am
doubting to go Coker because I am a notoriously weak freemounter. What
is other people’s experience with Coker mounting, and your prior fear
if any?

Klaas Bil

If you had this signature, I have forged it.

Re: Elementary ballistics…

> >When I bought my Coker, I was freemounting my 20 about 80% and my 26
> >about 50%. I took me only 7 attempts to mount the Coker first time, and
> >I was riding it almost immediately. Today I put the shorter cranks on
> >and I haven’t missed a mount (out of approx 6 on the ride.)
>
> That is heartening. I am vaguely considering to buy a distance
> unicycle by next summer (can do with the MUni till then!). But I am
> doubting to go Coker because I am a notoriously weak freemounter. What
> is other people’s experience with Coker mounting, and your prior fear
> if any?

Easier than on my new 24", but I learned on a Coker, so I could be wrong.

Re: Re: Elementary ballistics…

Klaas,

This will either encourage you or make you ill. I received my Coker D. today and spent lunch hour riding. I have ridden a Coker a very few times in the past and was able to nail the rolling mount after not too much practice. It’s still somewhat shakey but it works. I have to admit, I eyed the metal/pinned pedals with every mount fearing that they’d invite my shins over for a quick lunch.

But here’s the kicker. I had to go back to work, so I put the stubby post and Viscount seat on it and left it in the back of the driveway for the boys to ride when they came home from school. Brad (9) gets home first and spent about 20 minutes riding before Ben (12) got home. Ben is a natural and can mount and ride the Coker with no problem. Starting to feel ill? I am.

Then tonight, we dropped the boys off at soccer practice and went shopping. Brad had a half hour before his practice started and was practicing on the Coker. When Mary and I returned just at the end of practice, Brad demonstrated his new skill, his Coker freemount. Now I’m ill. He does a combination of rolling/tire grab mount and is up and away. After Brad’s demonstration, Ben started showing off for the team by idling and one-foot riding the Coker in the grass. I think my illness is now fatal.

Well, that did it. Both boys have been saving their paper route money for most of the last year, came up with the cash, and we just sent in a Coker order for each of them. My dream coming true, Rochelle’s very own Coker club. We’ll have four of them in town now.

Again, I ask myself, “What did we unknowingly do to ourselves when we purchased that first little unicycle just a short time ago?”

Bruce

…oh yeah, both boys mastered Greg’s Uni.5 at UNICON in no time. Oh to be young of body again (I’m still young of brain and wit).

B

I taught myself to freemount, never having seen another unicycle. I learned on a 20 inch pashley UMX, and did a sort of static mount with the pedals more or less in the six o’clock position.

When I got the 26, I applied this technique to that, and found it difficult.

I then met a few other riders, including Mark Wiggins, and he warned me that if I bought a Coker, I would need to change my technique. More or less, he suggested a quarter to 3 static mount: put the cranks more or les horizontal and put the seat in the crotch , then leap forwards and up.

With practice, I have found that a twenty to 2 position is best, with the nearer pedal the lower of the two. Give a slight forward shove, so that the pedal starts to rise, then use it as a platform to launch yourself into the riding position. Not quite a rolling mount, not quite a static mount.

And the clever thing is that when you can freemount the Coker using this technique, you can transfer it to the smaller wheel sizes very easily.

The other thing I’d say is do a few assisted mounts (lean on a wall or tree) and get used to the feel of the Coker - it balances in a very different way from a normal uni. When you have the feel for it, the freemounting will be easier. The ‘difficulty’ with the Coker is not so much getting onto it, but getting it to start rolling when you’re on. Acceleration is amazingly slow compared to even a 26. For the first few times, I got on, pushed the front pedal and almost nothing happened, and I toppled off!

You know, Bruce, I met both Brad and Ben at UNICON and they are a couple of the nicest, friendliest, most fun loving guys I’ve ever had the pleasure of running into. And, to boot, they’re root beer fans. But if they started showing me up on a Coker I would nip it in the bud right then and there and curb their Big Boy privleges.

(In the UK is there a verb form of “kerb”?)

We just bought one of the new 24" ultimates. I’ve been working on the fence a few times with it but have yet to do any freemounts or revs. A 17 year old from the area tried it and, after practicing for about 15 minutes, rode it non-stop around the parking lot. I was feeling a little ill then too.

Yes, broadly meaning ‘to curtail’, and usually with the curb spelling.

Re: Elementary ballistics…

Thanks all for the responses re Coker freemounting. I think I’ll start
saving up for a Coker, to buy next summer. Bruce, the write-up on your
sons’ (sp?) progress was neither particularly encouraging nor did it
make me ill (unlike you supposed). Boys of that age just have their
own standards in these matters, and are incomparable to folks in their
late 40’s like me. :–)

Klaas Bil

If you had this signature, I have forged it.

I will warn them to mind their Ps and Qs, and most importantly of all, to respect their elders.

Bruce