E.M.U. - Invitationals in the uk

I am planning to organize a series of muni events over the winter and next year that will be run as invite only events.

The purpose of this format is to try and ensure that the riders in attendance can cope with the planned ride. This may be a night ride, a particularly long or technical ride, or even just a normal ride performed with few breaks and little hanging around.

Ensuring the standard of the riders will mean that the routes can be much more fluid and challenging, without having to allow for inexperienced riders.

I aim to plan the events for various weekends at different locations around the country - any help with location suggestions would be greatly appreciated - and run several “special events” during the year.

Some special events I have planned include:

Tutorial weekends - a chance for us to pass on skills to others,

Trials events and workshops,

Off- road Cokering, and…

The EMU flagship - A week-long muni event in the French alps during the summer!

I’d like to know who would be interested and if you have any suggestions

i’d be interested, but i’m not vry good at Muni so i’ll give it a miss, unless you’re planning a less experienced rider’s day

How do you measure the ability of a rider? I’ve only done a muni ride with someone else twice, on steep but not too challenging terrain, and it was ages ago too.

I’m quite interested, but concerned that my idea of “fairly good” may be somewhat lower than everyone elses…

Phil, just me

E.M.U - Extreme Mountain Unicycling

I’d reccomend that you ride muni fairly often and are able to go rideing for a solid 3 - 4 hours without many problems.

The type of event I have in mind is an all day ride (4 hours ish) through woodland involving a few short breaks.
the type of terrain will obviously vary, from the flat, technical muni that I ride here - to the hilly muni of the alps.

It’ll be BMW advanced style riding, but more so, and with little hanging about (because of the cold).

I guess the ride Joe and I did would be at the hard end of the scale but that’s the sort of thing I’m thinking of

I’ll organise one that’ll be open to all and post the route map so you can see if it’s your cup of tea.

Re: E.M.U. - Invitationals in the uk

> I am planning to organize a series of muni events over the winter and
> next year that will be run as invite only events.

The phrase ‘invite only’ concerns me a little. Do we have to take a test
before we get our exclusive “I ride with JR” T-shirt?

You are always welcome to organise rides with selected friends, of course.
But be careful to avoid organising more ‘formal’/publicised events where
riders
are deliberately excluded. That way lies elitism, alienation and resentment.
These are things absent from the UK uni scene, and so it should remain.

It is far preferable IMO to post a suggested standard for such events
to discourage people from attending who are not really up to it.

Arnold the Aardvark - overreacting again

not overreacting at all arnold, a sage voice of warning

JR, if i may, i’d like to suggest kicking this off with a general ‘evaluation’ get-together where riders can loosely and voluntarily group with riders they feel comfortable riding with
in a lot of major road races (running and c*cling) u’ll find seeding, voluntary or otherwise
this is done for a variety of reasons, safety among them
u dont want to spoil anybody’s weekend by having a less experienced rider injure him/herself trying to ride terrain they should never have attempted, given their individual skill levels
think of this as comparable to the ‘speed sessions’ at public skating rinks
i believe most uni’ists are more than happy to share experience and skills with up-and-comming riders
they also like to have a blast, challenging themselves in the company of their (current) peers

this sounds like a stunning idea

have fun

(wish i could join u:( )

Re: E.M.U. - Invitationals in the uk

> not overreacting at all arnold, a sage voice of warning

Mmmmmm… sage. :wink:

I do like the idea of muni tutorial sessions. At BMW we’d stop to play
on some feature or other for a while. Spending more time on such things
and helping people master new skills for getting up, down or over them
would be very useful.

Mind you, just getting out more often would help a lot too…

For my part, I am happy to demonstrate my falling technique. The trick
is to land on the one part of your anatomy that is not protected. Be sure
to land in a spiky bush for maximal enjoyment. :slight_smile:

OTOH something I desperately want to learn is how to climb hills more
effectively. Is there a trick to it for sustained climbing, or am I just a
fat lazy
blob who gives up too easily? I suspect the latter, but feel free to
contradict
me.

Arnold the Aardvark - wants to be in Joe’s gang

Re: Re: E.M.U. - Invitationals in the uk

The problem is that it is hard to know what people’s standard is unless you know them and ride with them.

It’s also difficult to describe the standard required without overdoing it in one direction or another, either putting off good riders, or getting people who aren’t up to it.

For example, my rides last weekend, I did a huge description for it, but from talking to people on the ride and from things people said on here, it’s obvious that the perception people had of it was anything from throwing ourselves off muddy cliffs to a little pootle round the woods.

Now it turned out that people who came were all okay for the particular rides we did. However, if anyone less fast had come on Saturday, we’d never have done such a good ride. It’d also have been pretty cold waiting for anyone slower.

The BMW version of getting an advanced / easy group is okay, but even the advanced ride there was quite slow and involved a lot of waiting, whilst the technical level of last weekend’s riding was only a bit higher than at BMW, the average speed was at least twice as much, which makes a real difference to the amount of riding you can take on and also makes the riding itself more fun.

The idea isn’t to be elitist, rather to have rides where everyone is capable of going at a similar pace, riding the terrain and keeping going for the full distance. If the idea was about elitism, this wouldn’t have been posted up here at all.

The idea is invitational in the loosest sense of the word, all events will be announced up here with details of the speed / expected riding time etc. , giving people a chance to say, oi can I come, if they’re interested. There will probably be riders who we don’t know who are up to this sort of ride as well as those we do. However, by having the invitation system there’s at least some way of checking people aren’t going to endanger themselves or the other riders on the ride. If you just mail about an event giving a description of the amount and style you’re riding, we’ll tell you if you’re going to kill yourself coming along and otherwise ask you along.

This is especially important in winter / highly technical / remote rides where slowing down the ride could be dangerous for everyone.

Joe (Marshall)

Re: Re: E.M.U. - Invitationals in the uk

I think the trick is partly mental, just making yourself keep going and not slowing down. The other thing is to get strong legs, either by riding up lots of long hills of increasing steepness, or by getting it from some other sport you do. I swim a lot which probably helps and ride in a bumpy area too.

The really important thing is if you fall off do try and get back on, the more hill riding you do the further you can go and walking up hills won’t help you.

Joe

Re: E.M.U. - Invitationals in the uk

> The idea is invitational in the loosest sense of the word, all events

Your explanation/interpretation is just what I was looking for. Thanks.

Re: E.M.U. - Invitationals in the uk

Arnold the Aardvark wrote:
> Mmmmmm… sage. :wink:

I know you’re adding “…and onion stuffing” to that.

> OTOH something I desperately want to learn is how to climb hills more
> effectively. Is there a trick to it for sustained climbing, or am I just a
> fat lazy
> blob who gives up too easily? I suspect the latter, but feel free to
> contradict
> me.

The trick is to go out riding hills with someone who’s almost but not
quite as good as you at riding up hills. This puts pressure on you to
ride further than them up every hill you come across. As your companion
improves, you are forced to push it that little bit more to save face.
Of course, if you haven’t been riding for a few weeks, this approach can
lead to several days without full use of your legs. Ahem. :wink:

Regards,
Mark.

Fujitsu Telecom Europe Ltd,| o
Solihull Parkway, | In the land of the pedestrian, /|
Birmingham Business Park, | the one-wheeled man is king. <<
Birmingham, ENGLAND. | O

Re: E.M.U. - Invitationals in the uk

> Arnold the Aardvark wrote:
> > Mmmmmm… sage. :wink:
>
> I know you’re adding “…and onion stuffing” to that.

Mmmmmm… adding.

> The trick is to go out riding hills with someone who’s almost but not
> quite as good as you at riding up hills. This puts pressure on you to
> ride further than them up every hill you come across. As your companion
> improves, you are forced to push it that little bit more to save face.

I see<grrr>. Has your companion been improving, then, IYHO? Answer
well and he might leave a little more of your Cointreau in its bottle this
year. :wink:

Arnold the Aardvark

Re: E.M.U. - Invitationals in the uk

Arnold the Aardvark wrote:
> Has your companion been improving, then, IYHO?

No. :wink:

> Answer
> well and he might leave a little more of your Cointreau in its bottle this
> year. :wink:

The 0.5" you left in the bottle last year is still there. Although now
that you remind me, it might not survive for long…

Regards,
Mark.

Fujitsu Telecom Europe Ltd,| o
Solihull Parkway, | In the land of the pedestrian, /|
Birmingham Business Park, | the one-wheeled man is king. <<
Birmingham, ENGLAND. | O

Re: Re: Re: E.M.U. - Invitationals in the uk

Thank you joe - this is exactly the concept I was trying to get across.

The first such ride I’ll be doing is probably after christmas but it’ll be a good’un

Re: E.M.U. - Invitationals in the uk

joemarshall <joemarshall.fi2io@timelimit.unicyclist.com> wrote:

> Arnold the Aardvark wrote:
>> *OTOH something I desperately want to learn is how to climb hills
>> more
>> effectively. Is there a trick to it for sustained climbing, or am I
>> just a
>> fat lazy
>> blob who gives up too easily? I suspect the latter, but feel free to
>> contradict
>> me.
>> *

> I think the trick is partly mental, just making yourself keep going and
> not slowing down. The other thing is to get strong legs, either by
> riding up lots of long hills of increasing steepness, or by getting it
> from some other sport you do. I swim a lot which probably helps and ride
> in a bumpy area too.

I think general cardio-vascular improvement helps too. The better
your heart + lungs work, the more you can do before lactic acid
buildup or breathlessness make you stop. Slowing down on a hill
can actually be good - having a short break of lower intensity
before cranking it up again. This is especially the case if the
angle eases for a bit - use it to recover while still riding.

Of course the P word raises its ugly head again…

Paul

Paul Selwood
paul@vimes.u-net.com http://www.vimes.u-net.com

and i quote, verbatim

"angle eases for a bit - use it to recover while still riding.

Of course the P word raises its ugly head again…

Paul

Paul Selwood"

u said it, not me

:stuck_out_tongue: