Dropped a ton of weight

So true in too many cases!

Part of my job is taking care of a commercial office building, and about a dozen vehicles; minivans, cars, and a pickup truck. There are good professionals out there, but they are NOT easy to find. So far, 100% of the electricians I have hired (for the building) have been one-time vendors. Most never even completed their work. Plumbers? Only slightly better; I think I have a decent one now. Car repair shops? I have a choice between good-but-too-expensive, or decent-but-suck-my-will-to-live (lots of waiting, they never call back, etc.).

Sorry, it’s a rant. You can leave now, or here’s some more:

Roofing specialist: We have a flat roof with membrane surface. It’s now out of warranty. The only company we’ve worked with so far is so flaky, I never know if they’re receiving my calls. Then yesterday two guys showed up, and repaired two of the four problem spots we showed them. No communication when they left.

Builder: I could really put you to sleep with the contractor we worked with when renovating/moving into this place. They cut all of our network cables so they wouldn’t have to work around them (they ended up paying half the cost of the complete rewire). They didn’t secure the building, and tried to blame us for tools getting stolen. They never told us about one of our brand new HVAC units on the roof being damaged by copper thieves, probably right after it was installed (they didn’t get any copper; just effed it up). We didn’t find out about that until the A/C didn’t wasn’t working in the springtime. $11,000 to custom build replacement coil, crane it onto the roof and install.

Gardener: I translate that to the company we work with on our sprinkler system. They’re actually not bad! Heede Landscaping. :slight_smile:

Tutor: Uh, that’s me when it comes to electronics and security. No comment.

Taxi Driver: Uh, don’t you usually get someone different every time? But many of the folks we support use ParaTransit, a “free” van service with lift-equipped vans and buses for people in wheelchairs. They suck, but are the only game in town if you can’t afford your own van. We have two minivans set up for wheelchairs, which covers some of our need.

Internet provider: Blah. Or we could switch to Comcast; quadruple blah.

HVAC: Our fourth vendor is doing well (we moved into the building in 2013)!

Okay, that’s enough. I feel better now. :sunglasses:

Gymnasts, acrobats, climbers, and ballet dancers are incredibly strong without being too big.

You forgot to include movers. Yes, so many people out ther get burnt with shoddy work, especially on houses, renovations, and construction, and then have to hire someone else to fix the mess they made. This gets very expensive and never seems to end.

Unfortunately so many service and skilled trades businesses are highly profitable incompetent ripoff outfits. In a big city they can keep going forever with an endless supply of customers to take to the cleaners. It can take a lot of trial and error to find someone who is honest, competent, and fair in many professions.

Sure wish they would bring back the Guild system for many professions. It was far better than the current free for all mess of widespread incompetence. Perhaps it’s better in Australia. In Canada and the USA, I just cringe when I have to find a professional to do something and don’t already have someone I know is good for the task.

There is a difference however from people who give crap service as a calculated way of keeping you coming back (did they fix only two spots on the roof so they can charge another call out fee when you ask them to fix the other two spots) or people who give crap service because they just don’t give a shit, are stupid, lazy or inept.

The OP claims that its all a conspiracy and they are purposely giving you bad advice to keep you coming back.

Your experiences John seem to me more lazy, inept businesses which is very common in todays world.

Big difference in my eyes even if the outcome may be somewhat similar.

Australia has 38 public universities and 3 private universities.

Gymnasts and Acrobats are definitely strong. Both do massive amounts of explosive body weight movements as a part of their regular skills training and for most gymnasts they also do a a number of specific sets of body weight exercises outside of skills training. Whether they are too big or not is subjective. I think they are too small.
Climbers have extremely good strength to weight ratio, however they are usually have a very lean stringy physique, I wouldn’t call them big at all.
Ballet Dancers are somewhere in between I think.

However all those sports still do greater amounts of body weight exercises than you get in street trials unicycling. The urban riders who have muscle train weights outside of riding.

“It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.” --Upton Sinclair

as a (card carrying:D) member of the petty bourgeoisie my grasp of english is insufficient (or may be the language is ambiguous: that’s why it is so successful) … do you mean the “decay is imperialist” (?) , that “imperialism is in decay” (which I don’t think) or talk about “decay accompanying imperialism” ? (sorry my english grammar needs a fix :o)

California’s got the most of them
Boy, they got a host of them
Swear to god they got the most
At every business on the coast
Swear to god they got the most
At every business on the coast
They got the flakes

–Frank Zappa

Well, there’s plenty of imperialism in the world right now, so in that sense you’re right that it’s not in decay, but the days when the imperialists could allow the existence of a petty bourgeoisie -professionals, artists, journalists, teachers and small business owners who could act or express themselves independently- those days are increasingly a thing of the past. That’s what I mean when I say we are in the epoch of imperialist decay.

In other words, the petty bourgeoisie, -who are neither capitalists nor the working class- is more and more required to provide some very direct service to the ruling oligarchs. UpRite mentioned the scientists who are owned by food corporations or the pharmaceutical industry, -an excellent example. I would also add the economists who make a living by devising austerity schemes, and the journalists and filmmakers whose job is to glorify the military and police apparatus, but of course there are countless other examples, large and small. In the 1950s, the McCarthyist purging of left-wing professors required the raising of a great hue and cry because at that time professors had some job security and were supposed to function independently enough to give the appearance of a democratic society. Today, the underpaid temporary employees who teach most American university courses can be dismissed almost instantly, for no reason whatsoever, or for any reason at all, with no explanation needed. In 2009, the NFL began requiring American football players to stand for the national anthem before every game.

Another symptom of the epoch of imperialist decay is the emergence of fascism: the ruined and enraged petty bourgeoisie leads a movement of violent attacks on the working class.


The Men who made us fat:

The Men who made us spend, playlist of 3 videos:

+1

Eating better helps, moving more to lose weight is a falsehood that has been disproven by science. Obese adults and children move less than their peers. It has been proven that today children are every bit as active as they have ever been. Obese children of today, and days gone by, move less than their lighter peers.

Moving more in a very obese person has a minimal effect on bodyweight, but it helps and should be done, without overdoing it. It makes a much bigger difference in a light weight person because they are physically capable of moving more.

A lean person who is extremely active can get away with a bad diet eating more crap as they are more able to burn it off. If they become a heavy person they can’t just exercise it off. They have to be careful not to over do exercise and avoid injuries and burnout. They also have to make sure they are eating properly, and deal with any other medical issue that could be making the problem worse.

It needs to be done patiently over a long period of time or there could be a weight rebound or damage to the persons metabolic system as happened to many that were on reality weight loss TV shows with moronic psycho trainers yelling at them.

Australia, with one of the highest rates of obesity in the world has milions of people per health specialist?
Obesity in Australia - Wikipedia

Things must be far different than I expected in Australia.

Canada with around 36 million people in 2014 has around 40,000 general practioners and approximately 28,000 medical specialists, and there is considered to be a shortage of all of them. Approximately one medical specialist for every 1,500 people.

https://www.cma.ca/Assets/assets-library/document/en/advocacy/01-physicians-by-Specialty-Province-2014-e.pdf

When I was young Soccer was something I looked into and decided to avoid. My impression was that there were a lot of wrecked knees from that sport. I am more into individual than team sports, and Unicycling just kills me at the moment, because I am too big. I do various calisthenics, bodyweight, punching bag, and hiking etc. Avoiding lifting weights, to get into new things after all these years, so I took up war clubs and the kettlebell.

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Again, we have 38 public universities and 3 private.

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Yes I agree, it is near impossible to out exercise a bad diet. Table pushaways are the best form of exercise for losing weight.

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You are actually agreeing with me here. Your conspiracy theory was that health professionals keep you fat on purpose so that you have to come back and see them as there is no money in healing people.

I made the point that there is no need for them to do that as there are millions of fat people and few health professionals in comparison. In your words “1500 per health specialist”. My point was that your conspiracy theory makes no sense as you could fix 90% of your patients and it is still unlikely that you will run out of new patients. But thank you for stating my point with facts. Very helpful :slight_smile:

Not sure it’s just the “too big” that kills you. While Song is right that it’s a rather low impact sport (unless you jump up some stairs or do muni in the mud), he forgets that during the learning phase, the amount of wasted energy (due to arms flapping around, and more than anything being incredibly tense figuring out how to stand on that thing) is insanely high!
When I first learnt, I would be soaked in sweat within 15mns of getting on the thing and riding it. The first mile had me lying down catching my breath and cooling my burning calves.

NO I am not agreeing with your ridiculous previous statement, which was that is was a fact that there are millions of people per health professional. Your words. You contradicted your false statement and then said you agree with me.

I saw a box of cereal in a store with “Reccommended by Dieticians” on the package. The listed unnecessary harmful ingredients included:sugar (the number 2 ingredient), molasses, brown sugar syrup, and salt. It was Kellogg’s All Bran Multi grain crunch. I found some other Cereals by Post and Muesli without any sugar or salt or other garbage added.

Anyone trying to improve their health or lose weight is far better off to avoid this “Dieticians Reccommended” product and look for the better options out there.

Think of what it might have been like with at least another 100lb of bodyweight, or double your bodyweight. Once you get the hang of this, and can relax with it then it should not be too tough.

All that arm flailing, sure is a great, but short lived aerobic workout at the moment.

I am working on losing both fat and muscle. After I get my bodyfat low, I will think about whether or not I want to get some of it back. Muscle is very heavy especially when it is in the wrong place.

I do eventually intend to get into Muni. If Muni was not a viable option I would be much less enthusiastic about doing this.

Looks like I am getting a break in the weather, time to get ready to head out.

I guess if the dietitians are recommending that cereal they aren’t recommending low carb diets then :wink:

The term “millions” was hyperbole, my point was that there are a large number of general public per health professional, you agreed with that. You said 1500 per health professional in Canada I think it was?

My second point is that the large number of general public per health professional is the reason that health professionals don’t need to ensure you stay fat for their business to continue. There are a large number of patients per health professional.

Assuming one health professional who worked 38 hours per week and saw each of those 1500 people just 10 times to get them healthy (you cant lose weight and get fit overnight). That means it would take 394 weeks for the health professional to see all his 1500 for their ten sessions. Divide 394 by a 48 working week year and that is 8 years before he sees all his 1500 x 10 times. In 8 years you will have more patients or people who may have been healthy before but are no longer so you likely have another 1500 patients made up of new/relapsed cases at that point.

So again why does he need to give false information to keep you unhealthy?

And at those public universities, the budget increasingly relies on student fees instead of state funding, right? And the cafeterias, maintenance and book stores are more and more run by private corporations rather than the university, and medical research on campus is more and more funded by private industry, and the researchers are flown to international conferences -sometimes in very scenic locations- by pharmaceutical corporations and the food industry, and they are given all sorts of little gifts and trinkets for their labs and their offices, and taken to lunch by industry representatives, and paid for their research by the industry. And there are Australian medical researchers who sign their names to articles ghostwritten by industry, right?

Established medical journals have identified these conflicts of interest as serious and widespread problems, at least in Canada and the US.