dominant foot / hand

I am wondering, has anyone given any thought to how which hand or foot is
dominant effects unicycling skills?

Most people I know are right foot dominant. However, I have not seen a
connection between being right-handed and right-footed.

When it comes to a trick which involves doing specific things with the
hands, I never seem to know which hand should do what. Seat-in-front, for
example, I first learned by holding the seat with my dominant hand, before
a frend suggested I use the dominant hand for balance, instead.

When hopping, I do not believe I use one hand more than the other, but it
seems that many clearly favor one side.

Then again, I may just be odd – I’m right-footed on a unicycle, yet
left-footed on a bicycle. I am left-handed, but usually reach first with
my right hand. Of course, I’ve always had problems with left and right.

Jeff Lutkus


Free e-Mail and Webspace - http://Unicyclist.com

> I am wondering, has anyone given any thought to how which hand or foot
> is dominant effects unicycling skills?

There was a big discussion about this a couple of years ago. People were
talking about which foot was dominant, and was that usually on the same
side as the dominant hand? But it came to a problem of determining what
your dominant foot was. I don’t remember anyone coming up with a method of
determining that worked for me. We simply don’t use are feet for that many
“skill” things.

> Most people I know are right foot dominant. However, I have not seen a
> connection between being right-handed and right-footed.

I don’t think this was established in those old discussions either. Many
people were same-side dominant, while many others were opposite.

As for me, I am strongly right dominant. I mount the unicycle with my
right foot, and hop with the right foot back. I hold the seat with my left
hand. I think this developed based on the need for a swift catch of the
seat back in the old (Schwinn seat) days. The right hand was quicker at
seat-catching. I can mount, hop, and seat-hold on the opposite side but I
don’t do it much.

> When it comes to a trick which involves doing specific things with the
> hands, I never seem to know which hand should do what. Seat-in-front,
> for example, I first learned by holding the seat with my dominant hand,
> before a frend suggested I use the dominant hand for balance, instead.

I hold the seat with my dominant hand. The balancing hand doesn’t have to
be dominant (to me anyway). Actually I hold the seat with either hand,
though right is dominant.

> When hopping, I do not believe I use one hand more than the other, but
> it seems that many clearly favor one side.

I hop mostly left to right, with right foot back and left hand on the
seat. But I think for somebody starting fresh, it can make a difference
which hand holds the seat because it is not a symmetrical arrangement. One
side probably offers advantage for hopping, though I’m not sure which.

> Then again, I may just be odd – I’m right-footed on a unicycle, yet
> left-footed on a bicycle. I am left-handed, but usually reach first with
> my right hand. Of course, I’ve always had problems with left and right.

Sounds like you have what we would call a “lack of dominance” back in my
days as a juggling teacher. Some people have strong dominance. The
stronger it is, the harder a time they have learning to juggle. For people
with less dominance juggling comes easier, as does doing other things with
either hand. Some people have a near or total lack of dominance, which is
generally more of a problem than an advantage. Neither hand wants to do
the job, and the brain gets confused.

My advice is the learn things on both sides. Give them plenty of time both
ways. Not only will you probably figure out what your dominant side is,
you will get better at the non-dominant side too.

Stay on top, John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone jfoss@unicycling.com
www.unicycling.com

“Someone who thinks logically is a nice contrast to the real world.”

John Foss wrote:

>There was a big discussion about this a couple of years ago. People were
>talking about which foot was dominant, and was that usually on the same
>side as the dominant hand? But it came to a problem of determining what
>your dominant foot was. I don’t remember anyone coming up with a method
>of determining that worked for me. We simply don’t use are feet for that
>many “skill” things.
>

What I remember from that discussion was noting which foot you would use
to punt a football. Most people know that.

>My advice is the learn things on both sides. Give them plenty of time
>both ways. Not only will you probably figure out what your dominant side
>is, you will get better at the non-dominant side too.

When I first learned to unicycle I only learned to mount with one foot (my
right). When my daughter began to learn, she started showing me that she
could mount with her left also. I tried it and found out I couldn’t do it
at all! It took me weeks to learn how to use my left foot to mount. Since
that time I have made it a general rule to learn all skills using both
“sides.” I decided that the learning process was so long and tedious (I am
a slow learner), that I might as well learn skills with each foot at the
same time and cut the learning time in half! So by the time I had mastered
riding one footed with my left foot (a level 4 skill) I had also
accomplished a level 6 skill (one footed riding with my right foot).

One thing that I didn’t do, which I wish I had done, is learn to ride
backwards the same time that I was learning to ride forwards. I found
backwards riding to be just like learning from the beginning, in fact,
harder than learning to ride forwards.

I also make it a point to practice turning skills both right and left
directions and also practice certain seat out skills while holding the
seat with either the right or left hand. Because of this I am really
indifferent about which foot I idle with in one foot idling, for example.
They are both equally good. If I find that one side is better than the
other I try to practice on the weaker side. For example, when I was
learning to ride one footed, I started out doing it with my left foot. I
am right foot dominant, so I reasoned that I would start with my weaker
foot to give it a head start. As it turns out my right foot has never
quite caught up. While I can ride one-footed fairly easily with either
foot, I prefer the left (I race left footed for example).

For the last 2 plus years I have been working on one foot wheel walk (yes,
that is really more than 2 years; I said I was a slow learner). I practice
with both my right and left foot. Because I am strongly right foot
dominant, my mind and body did not want to try to do it left footed! But I
forced it. Until a couple of months ago I was noting that my left foot was
lagging behind the right. So I decided to practice twice as much with my
left foot as with my right. After a couple of months my left foot has
caught up!

If I don’t force myself to practice with the weak side, then the strong
side gets better and better. I think this is due to a couple of reasons.
The first is that the better side gets a lot more practice on each
attempt. If I merely alternate attempts, the better side gets more
practice! (For example, I may go 9 peddles right footed, but only 3 pedals
left footed; so the right foot gets 3 times as much practice on its turn).
And if I don’t consciously choose to practice with both feet, my natural
inclination is to practice with the dominant side/foot, because it is so
much more fun with the better foot/side. So I use little “tricks” to force
myself to practice with both feet (or both hands, or both directions). For
example, if I ride east I do the skill left footed, but if I ride west I
do the skill right footed. This counteracts the tendency to neglect the
weak foot/side.

Scott Arnold Springfield, Oregon

Handlebars are for wimps

>What I remember from that discussion was noting which foot you would use
>to punt a football. Most people know that.

hmm, interesting. I’m no football player, so maybe this is my
problem… but I’d use my left foot for that… and I’m right-foot
dominant on the unicycle.

>When I first learned to unicycle I only learned to mount with one foot
>(my right). When my daughter began to learn, she started showing me that
>she could mount with her left also. I tried it and found out I couldn’t
>do it at all! It took me weeks to learn how to use my left foot to mount.
>Since that time I have made it a general rule to learn all skills using
>both “sides.” I decided that the learning process was so long and tedious
>(I am a slow learner), that I might as well learn skills with each foot
>at the same time and cut the learning time in half! So by the time I had
>mastered riding one footed with my left foot (a level 4 skill) I had also
>accomplished a level 6 skill (one footed riding with my right foot).

I agree, that is a good idea. I think John had some very interesting
points about a weak vs. strong dominance of one side vs. the other.

I can ride one-footed with my right foot quite well, but not with my left.
Well, after reading John’s post, I went out and rode five revolutions
left-footed on my second attempt. Hmm, most intriguing.

I think when to learn the other side is a personal matter. People who are
strongly dominant on one side would probably be best to work both sides at
once. People who have a weakly dominant side could more easily get away
with learning with the strong side first, then trying the weaker side –
just as long as the weak side is attempted rather quickly after the weak.

With my one-footing, I spent a few months getting good at one-footed on
the right, so that makes one-footed on the left a bit harder to learn.
I’ll use a juggling counter-example because I have one… I was learning
to throw clubs continuously behind my back with my left hand. I was making
good progress, but still not rock solid at it. Then, at one point, I got
my left and right confused as I sometimes do, and started working on right
hand throws without realizing it. It wasn’t until I got about ten tosses
perfectly that I remembered I’d never tried that with that hand before.

Even if you learn one side until you’re good with that one side, work on
the other, and continue working on the other. I remember when I first
learned to pass clubs, I passed left-handed with a left-handed teacher.
Then, when I got good with the left, I learned right-handed, which just
about everyone else uses. Eventually, I met someone who was showing me a
really cool pattern, which required I be able to pass left handed. I
figured it’d be no sweat, because I learned that way. No dice… it took
me a few hours to re-learn what I had forgotten by not using, and it still
is nowhere near as natural as right-handed has become.

Jeff Lutkus


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> >What I remember from that discussion was noting which foot
> you would use to punt a football. Most people know that.
>
> hmm, interesting. I’m no football player, so maybe this is my problem…
> but I’d use my left foot for that… and I’m right-foot dominant on the
> unicycle.

That’s also interesting. I remember this coming up in the previous
discussion about dominant sides. I pretty much do everything with my right
foot though.

> I can ride one-footed with my right foot quite well, but not with my
> left. Well, after reading John’s post, I went out and rode five
> revolutions left-footed on my second attempt. Hmm, most intriguing.

It’s all in your mind. I have found that if I tell my left foot to use
what my right foot already knows, the results are not too bad. But
definitely practice is needed for any real progress.

> because I have one… I was learning to throw clubs continuously behind
> my back with my left hand. I was making good progress, but still not
> rock solid at it. Then, at one point, I got my left and right confused
> as I sometimes do, and started working on right hand throws without
> realizing
> it. It wasn’t until I got about ten tosses perfectly that I remembered
> I’d never tried that with that hand before.

So it sounds like you do not have a strong dominant side, giving you more
equal skill on each side (assuming equal practice).

Stay on top, John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone jfoss@unicycling.com
www.unicycling.com

“Someone who thinks logically is a nice contrast to the real world.”

> >What I remember from that discussion was noting which foot
> you would use to punt a football. Most people know that.
>
> hmm, interesting. I’m no football player, so maybe this is my problem…
> but I’d use my left foot for that… and I’m right-foot dominant on the
> unicycle.

That’s also interesting. I remember this coming up in the previous
discussion about dominant sides. I pretty much do everything with my right
foot though.

> I can ride one-footed with my right foot quite well, but not with my
> left. Well, after reading John’s post, I went out and rode five
> revolutions left-footed on my second attempt. Hmm, most intriguing.

It’s all in your mind. I have found that if I tell my left foot to use
what my right foot already knows, the results are not too bad. But
definitely practice is needed for any real progress.

> because I have one… I was learning to throw clubs continuously behind
> my back with my left hand. I was making good progress, but still not
> rock solid at it. Then, at one point, I got my left and right confused
> as I sometimes do, and started working on right hand throws without
> realizing
> it. It wasn’t until I got about ten tosses perfectly that I remembered
> I’d never tried that with that hand before.

So it sounds like you do not have a strong dominant side, giving you more
equal skill on each side (assuming equal practice).

Stay on top, John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone jfoss@unicycling.com
www.unicycling.com

“Someone who thinks logically is a nice contrast to the real world.”

>That’s also interesting. I remember this coming up in the previous
>discussion about dominant sides. I pretty much do everything with my
>right foot though.

Though one foot is doing the kicking of the football, the other’s got to
be standing on the ground.

>It’s all in your mind. I have found that if I tell my left foot to use
>what my right foot already knows, the results are not too bad. But
>definitely practice is needed for any real progress.

yes and no. My analysis is when I learn a trick I have no idea how to do
it, so I try and try and try, until I finally understand what I’m supposed
to be doing. This understanding comes at the poing where I can make a
reasonable run at the trick on one side. Learning on the other side takes
the same amount of effort to teach the muscles what to do, but because my
brain already knows what that is, it’s a lot easier.

>So it sounds like you do not have a strong dominant side, giving you more
>equal skill on each side (assuming equal practice).

I believe equal practice will give anyone equal skill on either side. I’m
left-handed, and being in a right-handed world, I’ve had to practice
things with both hands more than most right-handed people. It’s just when
you do everything with one side, the other side gets no practice.

I originally started this thread to find out which side would be easiest
for me to do various tricks on. I suppose the answer is irrelevent, and I
should just work on both. (I wish I developed this philosophy when I was
in kindergarden – if I did, I’d be able to write just as well with either
hand by now.)

Jeff Lutkus


Free e-Mail and Webspace - http://Unicyclist.com

>That’s also interesting. I remember this coming up in the previous
>discussion about dominant sides. I pretty much do everything with my
>right foot though.

Though one foot is doing the kicking of the football, the other’s got to
be standing on the ground.

>It’s all in your mind. I have found that if I tell my left foot to use
>what my right foot already knows, the results are not too bad. But
>definitely practice is needed for any real progress.

yes and no. My analysis is when I learn a trick I have no idea how to do
it, so I try and try and try, until I finally understand what I’m supposed
to be doing. This understanding comes at the poing where I can make a
reasonable run at the trick on one side. Learning on the other side takes
the same amount of effort to teach the muscles what to do, but because my
brain already knows what that is, it’s a lot easier.

>So it sounds like you do not have a strong dominant side, giving you more
>equal skill on each side (assuming equal practice).

I believe equal practice will give anyone equal skill on either side. I’m
left-handed, and being in a right-handed world, I’ve had to practice
things with both hands more than most right-handed people. It’s just when
you do everything with one side, the other side gets no practice.

I originally started this thread to find out which side would be easiest
for me to do various tricks on. I suppose the answer is irrelevent, and I
should just work on both. (I wish I developed this philosophy when I was
in kindergarden – if I did, I’d be able to write just as well with either
hand by now.)

Jeff Lutkus


Free e-Mail and Webspace - http://Unicyclist.com

>That’s also interesting. I remember this coming up in the previous
>discussion about dominant sides. I pretty much do everything with my
>right foot though.

Though one foot is doing the kicking of the football, the other’s got to
be standing on the ground.

>It’s all in your mind. I have found that if I tell my left foot to use
>what my right foot already knows, the results are not too bad. But
>definitely practice is needed for any real progress.

yes and no. My analysis is when I learn a trick I have no idea how to do
it, so I try and try and try, until I finally understand what I’m supposed
to be doing. This understanding comes at the poing where I can make a
reasonable run at the trick on one side. Learning on the other side takes
the same amount of effort to teach the muscles what to do, but because my
brain already knows what that is, it’s a lot easier.

>So it sounds like you do not have a strong dominant side, giving you more
>equal skill on each side (assuming equal practice).

I believe equal practice will give anyone equal skill on either side. I’m
left-handed, and being in a right-handed world, I’ve had to practice
things with both hands more than most right-handed people. It’s just when
you do everything with one side, the other side gets no practice.

I originally started this thread to find out which side would be easiest
for me to do various tricks on. I suppose the answer is irrelevent, and I
should just work on both. (I wish I developed this philosophy when I was
in kindergarden – if I did, I’d be able to write just as well with either
hand by now.)

Jeff Lutkus


Free e-Mail and Webspace - http://Unicyclist.com

lutkus@unicyclist.com writes:
>I believe equal practice will give anyone equal skill on either side. I’m
>left-handed, and being in a right-handed world, I’ve had to practice
>things with both hands more than most right-handed people. It’s just when
>you do everything with one side, the other side gets no practice.
Jeff, this may be ignoring the ‘fact’ (I think I heard this reliably) that
lefties tend to be more ambi than righties. I am a lefty, too, and I know
it’s always been easier for me than for most of my friends to switch
hands/feet. I had little trouble translating squash or tennis to my R hand
when I hurt my L wrist in college.
>
>I originally started this thread to find out which side would be easiest
>for me to do various tricks on. I suppose the answer is irrelevent, and I
>should just work on both. (I wish I developed this philosophy when I was
>in kindergarden – if I did, I’d be able to write just as well with
>either hand by now.)
As it happens, practice makes perfect. I can write with either hand (and
took an exam righty when I had that wrist problem mentioned above) and can
also do even less useful things like writing backwards (developed when I
was in camp as a kid) and upside down (which comes in very handy since I
am a tutor). None of these came naturally, but with practice, all were
fairly effortless.

Since I am a lefty, it made sense when I was starting to mount with my
left foot down. I usually idle with the left foot down (in the arc), and
it’s always been easier to ride one foot with the left foot. When I hop or
jump, I prefer having the left foot back, and I find it easier to jump to
the right.

[By the way, with scooters and skateboards, my left foot is the one that
does the ‘stroking.’]

David

>As it happens, practice makes perfect. I can write with either hand (and
>took an exam righty when I had that wrist problem mentioned above) and
>can also do even less useful things like writing backwards (developed
>when I was in camp as a kid) and upside down (which comes in very handy
>since I am a tutor). None of these came naturally, but with practice, all
>were fairly effortless.

I agree, though, I tend to believe, unless you are truly free of having a
dominant side, you will use one side more than the other, and therefore
become better with that side. I take notes on the left pages with my left
hand, and on the right pages with my right. However, my right hand cannot
write nearly as quickly as the left.

>Since I am a lefty, it made sense when I was starting to mount with my
>left foot down. I usually idle with the left foot down (in the arc), and
>it’s always been easier to ride one foot with the left foot. When I hop
>or jump, I prefer having the left foot back, and I find it easier to jump
>to the right.

I still disagree with this – I haven’t heard any psysiological
explanation, but the dominant hand is not necessarily on the same side as
the dominant foot. I’m left-handed, but idle with my right foot down. I
know many right-handed people who idle with the right foot down, and
several right-handers who idle with the left down. I still do wonder why
this is the case.


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lutkus@unicyclist.com writes:
>I still disagree with this – I haven’t heard any psysiological
>explanation, but the dominant hand is not necessarily on the same side as
>the dominant foot. I’m left-handed, but idle with my right foot down. I
>know many right-handed people who idle with the right foot down, and
>several right-handers who idle with the left down. I still do wonder why
>this is the case.
My brother and another person I know both learned to mount and idle with
the opposite foot to their hand dominance. That is, both are righties who
have a left foot dominance with their unis (and only with their unis).

In at least in the case of my brother, it was a matter of copying me w/o
realizing that he should have switched feet! This was 20 years ago, so now
he’s locked in to that dominance.

BTW, it’s amazing that you can take notes with both hands – that is
approaching true ambidexterity.

David

Are you “right footed” if you FIRST put your right foot on the pedel
(right down)? or are you “right footed” if you put your right foot on the
pedel second (left down)?

At one time I thought the first, then I thought it was the second, now I
don’t think it means anything but that’s the way you learned.

Dirk

-----Original Message----- From: David Stone [mailto:dstone@packer.edu]
Sent: Thursday, June 07, 2001 12:47 PM To: lutkus@unicyclist.com
Cc: unicycling@winternet.com Subject: Re(2): RE: dominant foot / hand

lutkus@unicyclist.com writes:
>I still disagree with this – I haven’t heard any psysiological
>explanation, but the dominant hand is not necessarily on the same side as
>the dominant foot. I’m left-handed, but idle with my right foot down. I
>know many right-handed people who idle with the right foot down, and
>several right-handers who idle with the left down. I still do wonder why
>this is the case.
My brother and another person I know both learned to mount and idle with
the opposite foot to their hand dominance. That is, both are righties who
have a left foot dominance with their unis (and only with their unis).

In at least in the case of my brother, it was a matter of copying me w/o
realizing that he should have switched feet! This was 20 years ago, so now
he’s locked in to that dominance.

BTW, it’s amazing that you can take notes with both hands – that is
approaching true ambidexterity.

David

>In at least in the case of my brother, it was a matter of copying me w/o
>realizing that he should have switched feet! This was 20 years ago, so
>now he’s locked in to that dominance.

When I teach someone to ride, I usually say, “Most people are right-foot
dominant. Just use whichever foot feels most natural. I am left handed yet
right-foot dominant.” I do not believe I’ve taught anyone left-handed, but
almost everyone was right-foot dominant. Occasionally, I’d find someone
who perferred to use his left foot.

>BTW, it’s amazing that you can take notes with both hands – that is
>approaching true ambidexterity.

thanks, though, approaching is the key word. I still write with my left
hand most of the time, and if I’m in electronics class, I must take almost
all notes with my left, as my right is not yet good at drawing circuit
diagarms. True ambidexterity (my opinion, I haven’t checked with Webster)
comes only when you can just as easily do things with either hand. While I
can do a lot (even most) things with either hand, I cannot do everything,
and my left almost always has superior skill to my right. Even so, I think
it is a good goal to shoot for – in unicycling (I love the part in
Universe where Kris breaks a crank arm, and rides away one-footed… who
is to tell which side crank will fall off?) or any other part of life. The
only real problem with ambidexterity is the better you get at it, the
harder a time you have telling your left from your right :slight_smile:

suktuL ffeJ


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You are right footed if you put your right foot down first – that implies
you are most comfortable idling with your right foot down, or riding
one-footed with your right foot on the pedal.

In the case or idling (one or two footed) and one-footed riding, your
right foot (assuming you’re right-footed) is the one doing all the work.
Your left foot helps out, but only to stabalise you.

Jeff Lutkus

— “Iwema, Dirk (GEAE)” <dirk.iwema@ae.ge.com>
> wrote: Are you “right footed” if you FIRST put your right foot on the
> pedel (right down)? or are you “right footed” if you put your right foot
> on the pedel second (left down)?
>
>At one time I thought the first, then I thought it was the second, now I
>don’t think it means anything but that’s the way you learned.
>
>Dirk


Free e-Mail and Webspace - http://Unicyclist.com

Ah, but I mount and idle with my left foot down and one foot with my
right. I’m right handed. Conclusion - some skills are not based on your
“handedness” but how you learn. Dirk

-----Original Message----- From: Jeff Lutkus
[mailto:lutkus@unicyclist.com] Sent: Friday, June 08, 2001 8:09 AM To:
Iwema, Dirk (GEAE); ‘unicycling@winternet.com’ Subject: RE: Re(2): RE:
dominant foot / hand

You are right footed if you put your right foot down first – that implies
you are most comfortable idling with your right foot down, or riding
one-footed with your right foot on the pedal.

In the case or idling (one or two footed) and one-footed riding, your
right foot (assuming you’re right-footed) is the one doing all the work.
Your left foot helps out, but only to stabalise you.

Jeff Lutkus

— “Iwema, Dirk (GEAE)” <dirk.iwema@ae.ge.com>
> wrote: Are you “right footed” if you FIRST put your right foot on the
> pedel (right down)? or are you “right footed” if you put your right foot
> on the pedel second (left down)?
>
>At one time I thought the first, then I thought it was the second, now I
>don’t think it means anything but that’s the way you learned.
>
>Dirk


Free e-Mail and Webspace - http://Unicyclist.com

Yes, and this also touches on what John said about having a strong, vs.
a weaker dominance. I would guess by this that you fit the weak
dominance category.

Or, different people taught you different tricks, and you just did that
they did. :slight_smile:

I remember the person who taught me the kickup mount… he could only
kickup to a left-foot down position, but he could only idle in a
right-foot down position. I still don’t know how he managed to ride after
kicking up. (I think this is more an issue where he could idle left-foot
down – he just didn’t believe he could.)

Jeff Lutkus

— “Iwema, Dirk (GEAE)” <dirk.iwema@ae.ge.com>
> wrote: Ah, but I mount and idle with my left foot down and one foot with
> my right. I’m right handed. Conclusion - some skills are not based on
> your “handedness” but how you learn. Dirk


Free e-Mail and Webspace - http://Unicyclist.com

> I remember the person who taught me the kickup mount… he could only
> kickup to a left-foot down position, but he could only idle in a
> right-foot down position. I still don’t know how he managed to ride
> after kicking up.

Hey! That’s how I do it. I have always taught the dominant foot as the one
that does the kicking. A successful kickup mount leaves you in the dead
spot, with the foot that was on top of the uni now at the bottom of the
pedal stroke. From here, the foot that just did the kicking pushes the top
pedal from the front, bringing you back into a safety position or a little
farther back to idle. Generally a mount is followed by riding away, so
this method works well for me.

It doesn’t get us any further on the whole left/right thing tho…

I liked reading from Scott Arnold and others about how they simply
disciplined themselves and learned things on both sides. Surely if you can
learn to ride a unicycle in the first place, you can learn to use your
non-dominant foot for skills.

A possible source of side to side dominance comes from when children learn
to crawl. Some crawl with a right foot/left leg motion, while others crawl
with the same foot/hand on each side moving at a time. This could develop
into whether or not you have a strong or weak dominance.

So who is teaching these babies how to crawl?

Stay on top, John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone jfoss@unicycling.com
www.unicycling.com

“Someone who thinks logically is a nice contrast to the real world.”

>A possible source of side to side dominance comes from when children
>learn to crawl. Some crawl with a right foot/left leg motion, while
>others crawl with the same foot/hand on each side moving at a time. This
>could develop into whether or not you have a strong or weak dominance.
>
>So who is teaching these babies how to crawl?

Hmm, I’ll have to ask about that one. I do remember being told, though,
that I did not learn how to crawl properly until after I learned how to
walk. Perhaps that shows that I was born with at least some of my
oddness… I’d always assumed I had developed it over time.

A recent experiment in the living room also lead to nothing helpful.
Though, I started crawling with the opposite side foot and hand moving at
the same time, I soon discovered that my feet and hands move at differnt
rates, thus, I am constantly shifting between opposite at the same time,
and same at he same time, and um, somewhere in between.

Jeff Lutkus


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