Does Cycling help learn how to go on one?

This is kinda continued from the Still learning thread… but I would just like to adress the question if cycling of the Bike variaty helps the learning curve on unicycles.

From my experience teaching people how to ride, thoes who have a solid background in biking, (usually MTB) tend to learn alot faster that thoes who are just atletic or thoes who dont do anything else.

Now if so why would this be. I think it is due to an already smooth pedal stroke and a refinement of balance in the latteral direction already established.

I have had mountain biker friends (2 of them) pick up my unicycle and in an hour they could ride and turn arround. And one Flatland rider who could ride and wheel walk right away on his first unicycle ride. (he had a hard time mounting, but once he did he showed me up bigtime) This is alot less time than I have seen any non biker pick up the unicycle in (including myself).

So is this common or are my friends just gifted?

Re: Does Cycling help learn how to go on one?

In article <Checkernuts.e363y@timelimit.unicyclist.com>,
Checkernuts <Checkernuts.e363y@timelimit.unicyclist.com> wrote:
)
)I have had mountain biker friends (2 of them) pick up my unicycle and in
)an hour they could ride and turn arround. And one Flatland rider who
)could ride and wheel walk right away on his first unicycle ride. (he had
)a hard time mounting, but once he did he showed me up bigtime) This is
)alot less time than I have seen any non biker pick up the unicycle in
)(including myself).
)
)So is this common or are my friends just gifted?

I think sit-on-the-seat-and-go-forward biking probably doesn’t help
very much, and might even make it harder because you have to unlearn
stuff like balancing your weight between your legs and your seat.

But bike trials stuff and anything involving tricks and skills probably
helps. Wheel walking is a flatland BMX skill; I’d still be shocked if
anyone picked up the unicycle version on their first day riding a uni,
but it’s not all that different.
-Tom

I consider myself to be an above average mountain biker. I’ve been riding for years and have developed quite a few skills, and techniques.

I was just getting into riding the skinnies (wood planks and the likes) when I got my uni. I figured balancing on the uni would see my bike balance improve, and vice versa

Both skills are so completely different, that (I’ve found) neither benefits the other. Completely different balance, pedalling, climbing, descending, ect…

Perhaps someone has a different opinion, but I can honestly say that neither has improved because of the other.

But who knows? Buy a bike and see? Worst case scenario? You have a cool looking bike you can’t ride, but can still look at!