distance

recently, i started riding my uni to work… i like to leave it in an open
view for the customers, just to start conversation…which it does. :slight_smile:

the thing is…EVERYBODY (i should say, every non-unicyclist) can not come
to imagine that I ride this thing to work…which as we all know…isnt a
big deal at all. especially considering the fact i work about a 1/4 of a mile
from my house.

now, i here stories about guys riding 6/7 miles on their unis’… but, is there
anybody out there who thinks they ride the farthest to work/school/etc…?

i guess im just curious to know what the farthest commute among the popluation
of unicyclists…

cheers.

  • J

RE: distance

> I would personnaly like to know if there really are people commuting every day
> with small wheels(24 especially…)

Last year I rode to work a few times (about 3 miles or about 4.9 km) each way.
Not enough times, but it was supposed to be training for unicycle racing. But I
arrived at work all sweaty, and somewhere in the back of my mind this was used
as an excuse to returning to the bicycle. Sorry.

jf

Re: distance

Hi!

> recently, i started riding my uni to work…

My first Real attempt was this morning… I bought my 24" three weeks ago(anyone
knows of a german brand bought in the netherlands which name is TAQ33?) and it’s
been a week(and a WE) since I first began to ride longer distances(1 or two
kilometers)

> the thing is…EVERYBODY (i should say, every non-unicyclist) can not come to
> imagine that I ride this thing to work…which as we all know…isnt a big
> deal at all. especially considering the fact i work about a 1/4 of a mile from
> my house. now, i here stories about guys riding 6/7 miles on their unis’…
> but, is there anybody out there who thinks they ride the farthest to
> work/school/etc…?

I do not have a really big knowledge of weird unit systems, but a mile is
1.6kilometers right? I am happy to say then, that I did 2.5miles in 35 minutes
this morning(there was a little rain when I left home, but hopefully, the pedals
were not too slipery…)

> i guess im just curious to know what the farthest commute among the popluation
> of unicyclists…

I would personnaly like to know if there really are people commuting every day
with small wheels(24 especially…)

> cheers.
> - J

BTW, a big thanks to the group, I must say that reading your posts and related
web pages helped me a lot for my first weeks…

Bye!


Internet et la telephonie mobile ne sont que de la telepathie sans cerveau!

Boris Bret Philips Research Laboratories bret@ens.fr +31 40 27 42 453

Re: distance

> > I would personnaly like to know if there really are people commuting every
> > day with small wheels(24 especially…)
>
> Last year I rode to work a few times (about 3 miles or about 4.9 km) each way.
> Not enough times, but it was supposed to be training for unicycle racing. But
> I arrived at work all sweaty, and somewhere in the back of my mind this was
> used as an excuse to returning to the bicycle. Sorry.

I may start to commute for the next week on my 24" for the next week or so, to
get back into practice for the BMW. It’s only a couple of miles, but I haven’t
ridden at all since last year. Someone in a bike shop asked me to demonstrate on
the only unicycle in stock on Saturday and I was terrible!

By the way, I could still do with a lift to the BMW.


Peter Haworth pmh@edison.ioppublishing.com “The net serves four of the
five physical senses. You can get sight, and sound, and to a limited
extent tactile feedback. No one would deny that some portions of the
net smell, but I see no signs that taste will ever come to the net.” –
bill davidsen

Re: distance

I unicycle to work 1-4 times per week, 13 miles (20km) round trip. This distance
is completely reasonable on a Coker, especially since most of it is a bike path.
Now with the air/gel seat, it’s great. Fastest time one way so far was 31
minutes, about 13mph average. If I have to get in quick, I take the bicycle
(19.3mph average today), but I enjoy the Coker much more.

Like you, I park mine outside the office door and it generates comments (when I
have to duck to make it through the outer door for instance). I’ve been doing it
for a year, so many people at the office complex are used to seeing
it.As a recruiting benefit, my company now offers Unicycling Lessons - I’m
planning to buy a couple of company unicycles soon, probably a 20" and a 24".

This is off the subject, but it was really funny: riding up the bikepath
yesterday, I had to go to the side to avoid 2 women who were doing something
with a dog on a leash. One looks up, sees me coming and says to the other, “Look
out, there’s a …<big pause>…GUY coming.” I guess you had to be there.

Power to the one-wheel commuters!

—Nathan

“Jay” <procat@adelphia.net> wrote in message
news:rFqP4.461$jg.30124112@news2.news.adelphia.net
> recently, i started riding my uni to work… i like to leave it in an open
> view for the customers, just to start conversation…which it does.
>
> the thing is…EVERYBODY (i should say, every non-unicyclist) can not
come
> to imagine that I ride this thing to work…which as we all know…isnt a
> big deal
at
> all. especially considering the fact i work about a 1/4 of a mile from my
house.
>
> now, i here stories about guys riding 6/7 miles on their unis’… but, is
> there anybody out there who thinks they ride the farthest to
> work/school/etc…?
>
> i guess im just curious to know what the farthest commute among the popluation
> of unicyclists…
>
>
> cheers.
>
> - J
>
>

Re: distance

Boris Bret :
>I would personnaly like to know if there really are people commuting every day
>with small wheels(24 especially…)

As a student I regularly used to ride the 5.5 miles to university (3 miles of
that uphill) on my 20". Took about 45 minutes.

(I don’t have a great knowledge of weird unit systems, but I make that about
8.8km. A km is 0.621 miles, which means that a mile is 1.61 km, as you said).

Now I occasionally ride the similar distance to work on my 26", in about the
same time. But I usually take the bike.


Danny Colyer (remove your.head to reply)
http://www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/danny.html “Never argue with an idiot. They
drag you down to their level then beat you with experience.” - Dilbert

Re: distance v damage?

I only tried it once so would’nt count as commuting but I rode 10m to work and
back for National Cycling Week last year. The problem was the route used a
footpath which had a high camber requiring me to twist in the saddle to go
straight- it probably caused some of the problems with the patella tendonitis I
now live with.

Anyone else experiance this problem with road cambers? (Roger jus’ says it is my
lack of control/skill, which is probably also true)

Back to try some nice safe unihock tomorrow against the kids on blades.

Duncan Unstable & Unable.

Re: distance

thanks for the great response… you know, in all honesty…2 people asked
me the same question on the way to work: “Where’d the other wheel go?”

I sware…I never really figured someone would actually say that, but without
fail… twice in one day…

its good to be a unicycler :slight_smile:

cheers everyone

  • J

Danny Colyer <danny@speedy5.freeserve.co.uk> wrote in message
news:8enika$hns$1@newsg3.svr.pol.co.uk
> Boris Bret :
> >I would personnaly like to know if there really are people commuting every
> >day with small wheels(24 especially…)
>
>
> As a student I regularly used to ride the 5.5 miles to university (3 miles of
> that uphill) on my 20". Took about 45 minutes.
>
> (I don’t have a great knowledge of weird unit systems, but I make that
about
> 8.8km. A km is 0.621 miles, which means that a mile is 1.61 km, as you said).
>
> Now I occasionally ride the similar distance to work on my 26", in about
the
> same time. But I usually take the bike.
>
> –
> Danny Colyer (remove your.head to reply)
> http://www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/danny.html "Never argue with an idiot. They
> drag you down to their level then beat
you
> with experience." - Dilbert
>

Re: distance v damage?

munibods wrote:
>Anyone else experiance this problem with road cambers?<
Tire profile and tread pattern make a big difference in how easy it is to ride
on sloped surfaces. A tire with a rounded profile and nondirectional tread makes
riding perpendicularly across slopes easier, even on slopes greater than a
cambered road, such as on one of those sloped curbs, for example. A tire with a
square profile and directional tread wants to track downslope, and you will be
constantly fighting to keep going straight on a cambered road. I’ll bet that’s
your problem–try some other tires or borrow someone elses uni (like Roger’s?)
and experiment. Good luck and hope your tendonitis gets better soon.


Ted Howe (the guy who likes the Pashley seat) TedLHowe@compuserve.com Sacramento

Re: distance v damage?

“munibods” <munibods@breathemail.net> wrote in message
news:39107a80_3@news1.vip.uk.com
> I only tried it once so would’nt count as commuting but I rode 10m to work and
> back for National Cycling Week last year. The problem was the route
used
> a footpath which had a high camber requiring me to twist in the saddle to
go
> straight- it probably caused some of the problems with the patella tendonitis
> I now live with.
>
> Anyone else experiance this problem with road cambers? (Roger jus’ says it is
> my lack of control/skill, which is probably also true)

I also had lots of trouble with slanting roads and trails the first year of
riding. It felt like continual, off-balance effort. This has gradually become
less of a problem, and now I intentionally ride on slopes (sometimes steep, with
the upper pedal just barely missing the ground). So keep at it, don’t worry
about it - it just gets better.

—Nathan

RE: distance v damage?

> Tire profile and tread pattern make a big difference in how easy it is to
> ride on sloped surfaces. A tire with a rounded profile and nondirectional
> tread makes riding perpendicularly across slopes easier, even on slopes
> greater than a cambered road, such as on one of those sloped curbs, for
> example. A tire with a

Great description from Ted. Also I will recall an experience a bunch of us had
at the UNICON Marathon race at Quebec in 1992. This race was done around a
rectangular section of streets on the Laval University campus. It was several
laps around, staying to one side of the streets all the way. Much of this had us
riding on the left side of the road, on the camber. For us non-UK people who are
used to riding on the right side if anything, many were sore afterward from
having to twist to one side for most of the race. I had one leg that was much
more sore than the other one.

For me, I was on a skinny tire with relatively round profile. I just remember
that many people noticed discomfort from that race, supposedly due to riding on
a camber on the opposite side of the street than what they were used to.

John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone http://www.unicycling.com

“Wheel size matters” - Kevin (Gilby) Gilbertson