Dangerous UPD today

Re: Dangerous UPD today

At 12:03 10/22/2002 -0500, you wrote:

>Remember, a
>big wheel can roll a long way, even with the seat in the front!

More than once I’ve nearly been run over by my Coker because we were
travelling fast enough when it decided I wasn’t coming along and had an UPD
to the front that it continued rolling after me with the seat balanced in
the air (?!?) chasing after me as I ran out the speed.

My Coker and I, we be close pals, but it’s got a temper sometimes.

Mike
Eugene, OR

I usually UPD to the front of my Coker. The only time I can remember otherwise is on a downhill.
I get a foot knocked off the pedal sometimes. Sometimes I try to put it back on, but the odds for me are probably better when I just accept the UPD instead of risking a more severe UPD if I “miss” the pedal (ouch)
-Mark

Re: Dangerous UPD today

> More than once I’ve nearly been run over by my Coker because we were
> traveling fast enough when it decided I wasn’t coming along and had an UPD
> to the front that it continued rolling after me with the seat balanced in
> the air (?!?) chasing after me as I ran out the speed.

Me too. Grendel’s scary.

Re: Dangerous UPD today

> There have been various suggestions, some more serious than others. I
> suggest that it would be a simple matter to rig up a ‘dead man’s
> handle’. A caliper brake with springs which would hold it on, rather
> than off, and a brake lever which would hold it off rather than on.
>
> Taking this idea further, I can imagine a short cable with a ring
> slipped over the end of the break lever and a parallel rod. The other
> end of the cable would be attached to the rider. In normal use, the
> ring would stay in place at all times. Where there is a risk of the
> wheel running away, the rider mounts and then ‘clips on’ with his short
> cord. If (s)he falls off then the ring pulls off the lever, the lever
> is then released, and the brake caliper engages.
>
> I’m no engineer, but I could see several ways of making this work using
> mostly standard components.

This is a Bad Idea.

Consider Grendel: I’m riding along at 10 mph and UPD, so the brake locks.
Grendel rolls forward until the seat hits the ground, THEN LEAPS INTO THE
AIR.

Uh, no.

Re: Dangerous UPD today

“harper” <harper.cy59a@timelimit.unicyclist.com> wrote in message
news:harper.cy59a@timelimit.unicyclist.com
>
> >
> But a run away Coker is bouncing, not rolling. Braking the wheel will
> not eliminate the problem.
>
>

The one time my Coker got away from me to the front, the wheel did what
it typically does; roll steady and straight. It was the seat that bounced.
Getting the brake system to engage at that time would probably flip the
frame and seat to the front, making a bulldozer out of it. If the seat gets
in front, there’s still going to be a wreck. A locked up Coker might turn
into some kind of Stephen King wounded helicopter. If it’s just left alone
(naked like the day God made it), then it will roll somewhat straight and
predictable for those diving out of its way. The GBarnes stiffener plate
could have a tab out the back to scrape the pavement like those tabs on a
car’s brakes that squeal when the brakes are worn out.

Maybe attach one of those aerosol air horns under the seat so that if the
seat gets dragged it will sound off. The last thing that the pedestrian
hears is the sound of a Mack truck. Although, they might not see the humor
in that.

Doug

Re: Dangerous UPD today

harper.cy59a@timelimit.unicyclist.com writes:
>But a run away Coker is bouncing, not rolling. Braking the wheel will
>not eliminate the problem.

No, a runaway Coker is rolling (bowling, as Foss puts it), FAST. There is
little if any bounce. A brake system could work.

David

Co-founder, Unatics of NY
1st Sunday / 3rd Saturday
@ Central Park Bandshell
1:30 start time after 11/1/01

Re: Dangerous UPD today

Mikefule.cy3xo@timelimit.unicyclist.com writes:
>Taking this idea further, I can imagine a short cable with a ring
>slipped over the end of the break lever and a parallel rod. The other
>end of the cable would be attached to the rider. In normal use, the
>ring would stay in place at all times. Where there is a risk of the
>wheel running away, the rider mounts and then ‘clips on’ with his short
>cord. If (s)he falls off then the ring pulls off the lever, the lever
>is then released, and the brake caliper engages.
>
>I’m no engineer, but I could see several ways of making this work using
>mostly standard components.
>
>
>–
>Mikefule - Roland Hope School of Unicycling
>

Develop a prototype and I’ll test it. Sounds like a plausible idea. The
important thing is for the setup to allow the rider handsfree riding so
that the brake doesn’t activate suddenly if you take your hands off the
extension for one moment. The idea of a cable seems smart. Another
important factor: No accidental activation of brake upon hitting some
rough terrain.

Thanks for the thoughts. BTW, I’ll pay for the device.

David
Co-founder, Unatics of NY

Re: Dangerous UPD today

skurland@juggler.net writes:
>> More than once I’ve nearly been run over by my Coker because we were
>> traveling fast enough when it decided I wasn’t coming along and had an
>UPD
>> to the front that it continued rolling after me with the seat balanced
>in
>> the air (?!?) chasing after me as I ran out the speed.
>
>Me too. Grendel’s scary.

The trick is to lift up the Coker (awkward, since it’s behind you). That
can save you from falling over it, which happened to my friend Joe. As he
had nasty pin-pedals on at the time, you can see how this led to his
having seven stitches later that afternoon at hospital. It helps to have
some kind of extension to aid with lifting, but it’s not necessary, esp
with a Miyata seat.

David

Co-founder, Unatics of NY
1st Sunday / 3rd Saturday
@ Central Park Bandshell
1:30 start time after 11/1/01