Crank Problem?

What does it mean if I can hold the wheel still, but the cranks can still
turn slightly? Any way I can fix it? It doesn’t bother me when I’m riding.
It’s also on my giraffe if that has anything to do with it.

If it’s on a giraffe, your chain has probably gotten a little loose on
you. If you examine where the wheel meets the frame, there should be a way
to adjust the tension by moving the wheel slightly.

Alternately, the cranks, themselves, or the hub could have been damanged,
but I’ll bet dollars to donuts it’s the chain.

jeff lutkus

> What does it mean if I can hold the wheel still, but the cranks can
> still turn slightly? Any way I can fix it? It doesn’t bother me when I’m
> riding. It’s also on my giraffe if that has anything to do with it.
>
>
>
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I understand you have this problem on your giraffe and on your
direct-drive unicycle. On the giraffe it may be the chain. On the normal
unicycle, it means that the cranks are not tightly fixed. This is
something to correct IMMEDIATELY or your cranks may get irrepairably
damaged. Don’t ride on with it!

I have never done it and others may be able to give better instructions,
but what you have to do is something like this, assuming you have
cotterless cranks: loosen the central nut, take the crank off, clean the
crank and the axis, put grease on (may sound strange but it helps
fastening), put the crank back on, pound it on with a rubber or wooden
hammer, fasten the nut real tight. I think the last two steps have to be
repeated a couple of times, also after riding.

Klaas Bil

On Thu, 10 Jan 2002 06:25:05 GMT, “Bill Huff” <BHUFF@satx.rr.com> wrote:

>What does it mean if I can hold the wheel still, but the cranks can still
>turn slightly? Any way I can fix it? It doesn’t bother me when I’m
>riding. It’s also on my giraffe if that has anything to do with it.
>
>


“To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has been picked
automagically from a database:” “Area51, Asset, mole”

I use green Loctite (what is it, 290?) on cranks. Maybe others frown on this practice.

>What does it mean if I can hold the wheel still, but the cranks can still
>turn slightly? Any way I can fix it? It doesn’t bother me when I’m
>riding. It’s also on my giraffe if that has anything to do with it.

Here’s an old post that might be related to your problem… I eventually
had the sprocket welded to the hub and I haven’t experienced any slipping
since then.

Subject: Re: Schwinn Giraffe - safety issue From: UnicycleDK To:
rec.sport.unicycling Date: 22/11/99

In article <0.1b24d368.256a0266@aol.com>, Unilady@aol.com writes:
>A few years ago & had to have some work done on my schwinn giraffe
>('77). It
>
>was disassembled & when the uni was put back together (the lower
>sprocket & “lock ring” --think this is the name for it) they put on a
>lubricant between these parts then tightened the ring. I hadn’t taken it
>for a test ride then in my show it kept slipping, but after finally
>attempting to free mount it several times, I actually tightened it, but
>not for long because it slipped again. Fortunately, no kids were around
>me, but I realized the danger involved w/an improper assembly of a chain
>driven unicycle. I was later told by Tom of the unicycle factory that I
>needed to put red locktight between this area or weld it but I can’t
>remember why.
>
>Again, I recently had to take apart this area again to replace a spoke; i
>warned the bike store that I probably needed locktight but they insisted
>their tightening job was ample & thought the old locktight help–since
>they didn’t lub it. When I test rode it, it was fine, but only did so for
>a minute. Today in my show, it slipped again.
>
>How can I explain to these bike stores the reason why I need red
>locktight??

I.N.O.U. (Idiots Not On Unicycles)… Argh. I know the feeling of trying
to get help from bicycle shops that dont know anything about
unicycles. The problem you have is one that Schwinn took care of
on later models by bolting the sprocket to the hub. The screw on
style sprocket with a lock ring is borrowed from track bicycles
that travel in one direction and dont have to worry about much
reverse torque except for an occasional track stand. Using red
loctite as Tommy suggested is a solution that will work for most
unicyclists. Loctite and the “ample tightening” will probably do
the trick.

> Unfortunately, I don’t have the tools or vice to do this work myself.
>
>I think this same problem exists with some of the cheaper brands & this

This is called cutting corners. Unfortunately I’m dealing with this same
problem on my Not So Cheap Semcycle 6ft. The red loctite will hold up to
about a month of strenuous use if i’m lucky. My sprocket will usually slip
when i’m getting out of the side ride, this puts a lot of torque on the
sprocket in the oposite direction that it screws on. The only real
solution (also what Sem told me to do) is to have the sprocket welded to
the hub. A couple problems with this are that it makes it difficult to
change spokes and i havent been able to find anyone willing to do the
weld. Everyone is afraid of damaging the hub.

Unicycles arent supposed to feel like they have freewheels!

dustin kelm Unicycling Productions www.dustin.kelm.com www.unicycle.com
www.passageway.org/popculture/dustinkelm.asp

isa40:29-31