Coke Vs. Water

My cross country coach gave this email to me a while ago and thought I should post it here.

This is really an eye opener… Water or Coke?
>
>We all know that water is important but I’ve never seen it written down
>like this before.
>
>1. 75% of Americans are chronically dehydrated.
>
>2. In 37% of Americans, the thirst mechanism is so weak that it is often
>mistaken for hunger.
>
>3. Even MILD dehydration will slow down one’s metabolism as much as 3%.
>
>4. One glass of water will shut down midnight hunger pangs for almost
>100% of the dieters studied in a University of Washington study.
>
>5. Lack of water, the #1 trigger of daytime fatigue.
>
>6. Preliminary research indicates that 8-10 glasses of water a day could
>significantly ease back and joint pain for up to 80% of sufferers.
>
>7. A mere 2% drop in body water can trigger fuzzy short-term memory,
>trouble with basic math, and difficulty focusing on the computer screen
>or on a printed page.
>
>8. Drinking 5 glasses of water daily decreases the risk of colon cancer
>by 45%, plus it can slash the risk of breast cancer by 79%, and one is
>50% less likely to develop bladder cancer.
>
>And now for the properties of COKE:
>
>1. In many states (in the USA) the highway patrol carries two gallons of
>Coke in the trunk to remove blood from the highway after a car accident.
>
>2. You can put a T-bone steak in a bowl of coke and it will be gone in
>two days.
>
>3. To clean a toilet: Pour a can of Coca-Cola into the toilet bowl and
>let the “real thing” sit for one hour, then flush clean. The citric acid
>in Coke removes stains from vitreous china.
>
>4. To remove rust spots from chrome car bumpers: Rub the bumper with a
>rumpled-up piece of Reynolds Wrap aluminum foil dipped in Coca-Cola.
>
>5. To clean corrosion from car battery terminals: Pour a can of
>Coca-Cola over the terminals to bubble away the corrosion.
>
>6. To loosen a rusted bolt: Applying a cloth soaked in Coca-Cola to the
>rusted bolt for several minutes.
>
>7. To bake a moist ham: Empty a can of Coca-Cola into the baking pan,
>wrap the ham in aluminum foil, and bake. Thirty minutes before the ham
>is finished, remove the foil, allowing the drippings to mix with the
>Coke for
>a sumptuous brown gravy.
>
>8. To remove grease from clothes: Empty a can of coke into a load of
>greasy clothes, add detergent, and run through a regular cycle. The
>Coca-Cola will help loosen grease stains. It will also clean road haze
>from your windshield.
>
>For Your Info:
>
>1. The active ingredient in Coke is phosphoric acid. Its pH is 2.8. It
>will dissolve a nail in about 4 days. Phosphoric acid also leaches
>calcium from bones and is a major contributor to the rising increase in
>osteoporosis.
>
>2. To carry Coca-Cola syrup (the concentrate) the commercial truck must
>use the Hazardous Material placards reserved for Highly corrosive
>materials.
>
>3. The distributors of Coke have been using it to clean the engines of
>their trucks for about 20 years!
>
>Now the question is, would you like a glass of water or coke?

Sounds interesting. The thing is, with the “water” segment, you listed a lot of health risks and such but in the coke one you only listed things it can clean.

Guess what? Water can make cars look shiny and new! Damn that shit must be powerful, dont drink it. Also water comes from UNDERGROUND. Its so dirty. YUCK!

How about gatorade? Thats what I like.

That Might be interesting if it was true.

Claim: The acids in Coca-Cola make it harmful to drink.

Status: False.

Example: [Collected on the Internet, 2001]

  1. In many states the highway patrol carries two gallons of Coke in the truck to remove blood from the highway after a car accident.

  2. You can put a T-bone steak in a bowl of coke and it will be gone in two days.

  3. To clean a toilet: Pour a can of Coca-Cola into the toilet bowl . . . Let the “real thing” sit for one hour, then flush clean.

  4. The citric acid in Coke removes stains from vitreous china.

  5. To remove rust spots from chrome car bumpers: Rub the bumper with a crumpled-up piece of Reynolds Wrap aluminum foil dipped in Coca-Cola.

  6. To clean corrosion from car battery terminals: Pour a can of Coca-Cola over the terminals to bubble away the corrosion.

  7. To loosen a rusted bolt: Applying a cloth soaked in Coca-Cola to the rusted bolt for several minutes.

  8. To bake a moist ham: Empty a can of Coca-Cola into the baking pan;rap the ham in aluminum foil, and bake. Thirty minutes before the ham is finished, remove the foil, allowing the drippings to mix with the Coke for a sumptuous brown gravy.

  9. To remove grease from clothes: Empty a can of coke into a load of greasy clothes, add detergent, And run through a regular cycle. The Coca-Cola will help loosen grease stains. It will also clean road haze fromyour windshield.

FYI:

  1. The active ingredient in Coke is phosphoric acid. It’s pH is 2.8. It will dissolve a nail in about 4 days.

  2. To carry Coca Cola syrup (the concentrate) the commercial truck must use the Hazardous material place cards reserved for Highly Corrosive materials.

  3. The distributors of coke have been using it to clean the engines of their trucks for about 20 years! Drink up! No joke. Think what coke and other soft drinks do to your teeth on a daily basis. A tooth will dissolve in a cup of coke in 24-48 hours

Origins: Many
of the entries above are just simple household tips involving Coca-Cola. That you can cook and clean with Coke is relatively meaningless from a safety standpoint — you can use a wide array of common household substances (including water) for the same purposes; that fact alone doesn’t necessarily make them dangerous to ingest. Nearly all carbonated soft drinks contain carbonic acid, which is moderately useful for tasks such as removing stains and dissolving rust deposits (although plain soda water is much better for some of these purposes than Coca-Cola or other soft drinks, as it doesn’t leave a sticky sugar residue behind). Carbonic acid is relatively weak, however, and people have been drinking carbonated water for many years with no detrimental effects.

The rest of the claims offered here are specious. Coca-Cola does contain small amounts of citric acid and phosphoric acid; however, all the insinuations about the dangers these acids might pose to people who drink Coca-Cola ignore a simple concept familiar to any first-year chemistry student: concentration. Coca-Cola contains less citric acid than orange juice does, and the concentration of phosphoric acid in Coke is far too small (a mere 11 to 13 grams per gallon of syrup, or about 0.20 to 0.30 per cent of the total formula) to dissolve a steak, a tooth, or a nail overnight. (Much of the item will dissolve eventually, but after a day or two you’ll still have most of the tooth, a whole nail, and one very soggy t-bone.)

The next time you’re stopped by a highway patrolman, try asking him if he’s ever scrubbed blood stains off a highway with Coca-Cola (or anything else). If you’re lucky, by the time he stops laughing he’ll have forgotten about the citation he was going to give you.

Last updated: 20 November 2001

The URL for this page is http://www.snopes.com/cokelore/acid.asp
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Urban Legends Reference Pages © 1995-2004
by Barbara and David P. Mikkelson
This material may not be reproduced without permission


Sources:
Allen, Frederick. Secret Formula.
New York: HarperCollins, 1994. ISBN 0-88730-672-1 (p. 209).

Pendergrast, Mark.   For God, Country, and Coca-Cola. 
New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1993.   ISBN 0-684-19347-7   (p. 191). 

Poundstone, William.   Big Secrets. 
New York: Quill, 1993.   ISBN 0-688-04830-7   (p. 25-46).

wierd

Re: Coke Vs. Water

“gpickett00” <gpickett00@NoEmail.Message.Poster.at.Unicyclist.com> writes:

> Sounds interesting. The thing is, with the “water” segment, you listed a
> lot of health risks and such but in the coke one you only listed things
> it can clean.

Not only that, but the article failed to mention health risks in the
water section. A typical glass of water contains large amounts of
dihydrogen monoxide, a chemical which kills thousands of people every
year. www.dhmo.org is a great source of info about this compound.

But seriously, the article contains a lot of bias in the way the
information is presented. I wouldn’t trust the claims without further
research. For example, consider the statement:

Phosphoric acid also leaches calcium from bones and is a major
contributor to the rising increase in osteoporosis.

Maybe yes, maybe no. Soft drinks do reduce absorption of dietary
calcium, but it isn’t clear the acid “leaches calcium” from bones.
Studies show that women who drink cola (3 or more cans/day) have lower
bone density, but men don’t show the same phenomenon.

But I support the advice to drink plenty of water and moderate cola
consumption. I used to get dehydrated a lot when climbing, and
finally wound up with a kidney stone. Take my word for it, it was not
worth it - drink plenty, and carry extra even when you hear the
siren’s call of a lightweight pack.

> How about gatorade? Thats what I like.

There’s nothing particularly right or wrong about coke or gatorade or
my favorite beverage, cask strength single malt whisky. What matters
is how much you drink of it and when. There is no doubt in my mind
that people drink way, way too much sugary stuff today. Empty
calories at best. On the other hand, Gatorade (maybe watered down) is
a good choice for endurance activities. Personally, I don’t consider
it unless I’m going to be active for several hours.

By the way, I used to get dehydrated a lot because I didn’t like
carrying extra water when I went climbing. BAD CHOICE! My chronic
dehydration resulted in a kidney stone at agbe 42. Trust me, it
wasn’t fun. Now I try to drink plenty of water, and have to avoid
large amounts of the caffeine and tannins found in beverages other
than water.

Ken

Yeah, I’m sure it’s not entirely true but it does make you think more about what you are drinking. Mythbusters has a good show on this and they test out all of the myths. With the water part though, I’m pretty sure that’s true-or at least in my school. Everyone usually buys a can of soda and most people seem not to know that there is a drinking fountain with free, cool water right next to it. I haven’t had soda for more than a year and as a result I’m in way better shape than before. It’s a shame that everyone is drinking so much soda because of the calcium loss associated with it. I also heard somewhere that people drink way less milk than thirty years ago which only makes it worse. And mountain dew had that yellow dye #7 that keeps giving guys trouble… :astonished:

Re: Coke Vs. Water

Don’t let the Health and Safety people catch you doing that, there are special chemicals for removing bio-hazardous materials. I’ve personally seen this done after an industrial accident, it may be a federal requirement.

Water, cokes smells and tastes disgusting and it gives me a tummy ache becasue its fizzy

Ironically, over here in the UK there have been some recent issues with Coke and water.
Coke inc. have been selling a bottled water that is literally tap water - they take it from the mains water supply, filter everything from it and then, I kid you not, add impurities back to make it taste of something. The water costs 0.03 pence straight out of the tap but 75 pence when Coke sells it in bottles.
The only issue is that there is bromide in the water, which isn’t a problem in the concentration found in the tap water, but as part of the ‘improving’ process they bubble ozone through the stuff which converts the bromide into carcinogenic bromate (at several times the legal concentration limits).

However, as Coke have had to withdraw all of the bottles from sale, it appears that the only thing that has disapperared overnight in this case is Coke’s credibility.

They do that in the US too. The majority of our bottled water – especially the biggest sellers like Aquafina – is tap water. Aquafina is made from the finest tap water Detroit has to offer if my memory serves.

  1. Most bottled water is made this way.

  2. The Calcium Chloride is put back in at levels mandated by the British Government. At levels higher than the rest of the world.

  3. The levels of bromide in the Calcium Chloride that was used in that water was higher than normal causing the higher levels of bromate.

  4. The water was voluntarily removed from shelves as a precaution and was well within safe limits.

  5. Water is more expensive to bottle than cola. Every off flavor from the packaging ends up in the water, with cola it is masked substatially by the product flavor.

  6. The cost of bottled water from Coke isn’t any different than any of the other bottled waters such as Aqua Fina or Evian.

…Just checking to see if I’m still on the rec.sport.unicycling forum…

Wow, we have us quite a group of researchers! Fascinating what this group can come up with!

No just to toss a little monkey wrench into the discussion – let’s all remember what the vast majority of Coca-Cola consists of. Something over 90%… water!

Why Coke anyway? All carbonated soft drinks are vastly similar. And bottled waters as well. Though many come from actual natural springs, many others come from filtered city water. In many tests, people could not tell the difference between either of these, and unfiltered tap water. That must have been some good water. I can tell the difference at my house… :slight_smile:

If nothing else, the reference to the pH of phosphoric acid is misleading.

The pH of the solution as a whole is what’s important.

So Coke is a very large amount of water with a very small amount of phosphoric acid in it. That makes it a very weak solution.

Did you know bumble bees can’t fly?

!!! that’s a myth! OMGLOL!

It is much healthier to drink water than soda though. I usually drink milk. :slight_smile: I like it better than water and don’t drink too much soda. My mom pretty much drinks only Pepsi. :confused:

you know what i think…wait i dont really care just drink something when your thirsty. :roll_eyes:

Re: Coke Vs. Water

I like water. The main reason I like it is because it is free in NZ, and quenches the thirst. I drink coke sometimes, but it is a waste of money and has a lot of plastic packaging which is also a waste. My favourite water is cold fresh mountain water, straight from a stream on the mountain. I’m not worried about the health risks/benefits of either drink, so I drink whatever when I am thirsty. Beer is good too, in moderation.

Re: Re: Coke Vs. Water

Coke isn’t a waste to the people who spend 40 hours of every week away from their family making it for people to enjoy. I definitley suggest you drink more water than Coke, but for some it is a nice treat.

Re: Re: Coke Vs. Water

Here’s what happens when certain city officials in california find out about the dangers of dihydrogen monoxide.

Re: Coke Vs. Water

On Mon, 22 Mar 2004 11:37:04 -0600, “johnfoss” wrote:

>In many tests, people could
>not tell the difference between either of these, and unfiltered tap
>water. That must have been some good water. I can tell the difference at
>my house… :slight_smile:

Were those tests in the US? Pretty much all of the tap water I drank
in the US was so heavily chlorinated it was barely drinkable.

In the Netherlands, tap water from one location (I seem to remember it
is Doorn) is bottled directly, without any filtering or addition. And
since it comes from a natural source, it may technically be called
bottled spa water. Even people from that location seem to buy those
bottles - while they have the very same thing on tap at a fraction of
the price. All in the mind!

Klaas Bil - Newsgroup Addict

I think profile should make some stronger 145mm cranks - Ryan Atkins

Once, when I was a kid, my dad put a Tbone steak in Coca-cola for about 15 minutes. He cooked it over charcoal and placed it on a simple platter with no other seasonings. He set the platter on the kitchen table. He says it was gone in less than 20 seconds. He had gone back outside to the grill, and I was in the front of the house so we can’t explain for sure how it happened. Too bad St. Bernards can’t talk. Rufus, who was napping nearby, must’ve witnessed the event. Although, he was a pretty deep sleeper. Somewhat gassy tho.