coast?!! How the smeg do you do that?

I have started to wheel walk so I have some understanding of how you have the
balance but how do you keep going for 100+ meters. I would think that you would
just slow down and stop after a very short period of time. Do you sort of pump
with you body as you go or just gett up really good speed and then just let go.

Peter Bier wrote:

> In article <01bcd1ea$4b5a68e0$724d1ecb@redman>, “A Redman”
> <redman@orac.net.au> wrote:
>
> > How the @##! are you supposed to coast? It appears to be suicidal!
> Where do
> > you put your feet? The same place as one foot riding, but with no
> feet on
> > the pedals?
> >
> > Can ANYONE do it? or is it impossible. (probably)
>
> I have seen several videos of people doing it. There seems to be two
> techniques:
>
> - wheel walk one footed and go into a glide (instead of wheel walking your
> foot just regulates the turning of the wheel). Then remove your foot and
> place it on the forks (your other foot will also be on the forks). Now keep
> rolling without falling off:-)
>
> -ride one footed and then remove your foot. You don’t have to put it on the
> forks, I imagine it is left outstretched for balance purposes.
>
> Coasting is possible, just extremely difficult (perhaps why it is a level 10
> skill:-) I know that three people have passed the coast for 100m mark and I
> think John Foss has made 99m. But then maybe they aren’t human:-)
>
> Catch ya
>
> Peter
>
> o Peter Bier - computing student o O o pjb10@waikato.ac.nz
> o(|\o (delete nospam- to send a message)

How the @##! are you supposed to coast? It appears to be suicidal! Where do
you put your feet? The same place as one foot riding, but with no feet on
the pedals?

Can ANYONE do it? or is it impossible. (probably)

Re: coast?!! How the smeg do you do that?

<< I have started to wheel walk so I have some understanding of how you have the
balance but how do you keep going for 100+ meters. I would think that you would
just slow down and stop after a very short period of time. Do you sort of pump
with you body as you go or just gett up really good speed and then just let go.
>>

I studied that carefully, wondering the same thing about pumping. The very best
riders start out going very fast, and then hardly move at all while coasting. It
seems that any (any!) corrective motion wastes energy. It is obvious that
side-to-side corrections, twisting the hips for sideways balance, would involve
a lot of friction. What is not obvious is why forward-backward balancing
(bending at the waist) causes any friction. Maybe there can’t be any forward-
backward balancing without actually inducing the need for a little sideways
balancing.

At the end of each long run, when the unicycle is going very slow, the
forward-backward balancing gets more and more violent. It does indeed look like
pumping. But they never make much progress in that stage. Instead, they are just
getting a few more feet or inches.

When I was watching and analysing this, the track was the usual rubber racing
track, which has a lot of friction to start with. Maybe on a gym floor, a
different technique would be better. But even in that case, it looks like
smoother is better, even though the rides are much, much shorter.

Another way to analyse pumping is to compare it with in-line skates. Since the
unicycle has a single point of contact, pumping would be similar to what happens
when in-line skaters keep their feet together and pump back and forth to sustain
speed. It takes a lot of sideways motion to make it work. It is hard to learn
the pumping motion unless you are going downhill, because the friction slows you
down much too fast. Only a very strong sideways motion can overcome friction on
the level. If this action is possible with a unicycle, then there will have to
be a very strong sideways turning back and forth, which eats up energy through
friction. So my guess is that pumping a coasting unicycle is impossible.

Dave Matthews GoatLover@aol.com

Note: If the message background looks green to you like it does to me, I don’t
understand it any more than you do. I think I accidentally picked it up
from one of the spam messages, and now I can’t get rid of it without
retyping the whole message.

Re: coast?!! How the smeg do you do that?

In article <01bcd1ea$4b5a68e0$724d1ecb@redman>, “A Redman”
<redman@orac.net.au> wrote:

> How the @##! are you supposed to coast? It appears to be suicidal! Where do
> you put your feet? The same place as one foot riding, but with no feet on
> the pedals?
>
> Can ANYONE do it? or is it impossible. (probably)

I have seen several videos of people doing it. There seems to be two techniques:

  • wheel walk one footed and go into a glide (instead of wheel walking your foot
    just regulates the turning of the wheel). Then remove your foot and place it
    on the forks (your other foot will also be on the forks). Now keep rolling
    without falling off:-)

-ride one footed and then remove your foot. You don’t have to put it on the
forks, I imagine it is left outstretched for balance purposes.

Coasting is possible, just extremely difficult (perhaps why it is a level 10
skill:-) I know that three people have passed the coast for 100m mark and I
think John Foss has made 99m. But then maybe they aren’t human:-)

Catch ya

Peter

            o Peter Bier - computing student o O o pjb10@waikato.ac.nz o(|\o
            (delete nospam- to send a message)

re: Why judge riding by levels

> Why do you need to judge riding by levels ?
>
> Regards Colin. York - UK
>

You don’t need to but I think there are some advantages. INHO The USA levels
give new unicyclists some idea of what is possible and how hard things are
relative to other things. I found it really handy when I first started out to
have some idea of what you can do on a unicycle and what sort of things are a
good idea to learn first.

Of course you don’t have to learn things in any particular order but it often
helps. I still find the levels a source of inspiration and for goal orientated
people they are something that progress can be measured against. True, there are
things that can not be measured by any sort of grade system (eg riding style)
but that doesn’t make it worthless.

For the competitive goal types the USA levels are important and for those that
just want to ride, they can relax and not worry about them.

:slight_smile:

Ride and have fun whether you are interested in the levels or not.

Catch ya, Peter

            o Peter Bier - computing student o O o pjb10@waikato.ac.nz o(|\o
            (delete nospam- to send a message)