China Rehash

I hate to bring it back up, but it refutes what many were saying.
Intelligence was actually lost to the chinese…They should have bailed,
not land in a fucking enemy country…minute the media attention dies down
that pilot is toast.

U.S. Secrets Lost From Spy Plane

By GEORGE GEDDA .c The Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) - Despite the best efforts of American crew members, U.S.
secrets were lost to the Chinese when an American spy plane made an
emergency landing in China, the Pentagon said Thursday.

Asked at a briefing whether there was a loss of intelligence material,
Rear Adm. Craig Quigley said, ``We feel there was.’’

The EP-3E aircraft and a Chinese F-8 fighter jet collided April 1 over the
South China Sea.

The 24 American crewmen were released after 11 days but China has yet to
surrender the plane, which was on an intelligence gathering mission.

The crew did the best job they could with the time that they had after the collision and before the plane touched down on Hainan island,'' Quigley said. It wasn’t perfect, but we feel they did the best job that
they could.’’

The crew was questioned after their release by China and will be
questioned again when they return from leaves of absence, Quigley said.

``Our understanding is not complete,’’ he said.

Said Sen. Richard Shelby, R-Ala., chairman of the Senate Intelligence
Committee: ``We’ve lost some ground, but I don’t think it’s irreparable.
That’s the chance you take when you have a reconnaissance plane like that
that’s gathering data.’’

Rep. Porter Goss, R-Fla., who as chairman of the House Intelligence
Committee has had secret briefings on the incident, said the crew
performed admirably but we have suffered some damage. ... Is it
devastating? No, I don’t think so. But yes, I think it’s significant.’’

Goss also said the Bush administration should return immediately to the
air the unarmed, unescorted spy planes. Flights remain suspended
indefinitely. ``Our business-as-usual reconnaissance should resume
immediately, and it should be without any kind of patrol craft. We’re not
armed. We’re not a threat to anybody. It’s all lawful and legal.’’

The National Security Agency, the government office responsible for
collecting electronic intelligence, is conducting a review of the
potential damage done by the loss of the top-secret aircraft, said
government officials familiar with the study.

The crew worked quickly to destroy their computerized gear and its
contents in the minutes between the collision and the time they were taken
off the plane by Chinese soldiers, said one Defense Department official.

``They started through their checklist, which had five or six steps. They
had everything electronically zeroed out,’’ said the official.

Another military official, who also spoke on condition of anonymity, said
the crew was able to change ``key codes’’ for computerized information and
smash hardware with hammers.

The spy plane incident damaged U.S. relations with China, and Beijing
accused President Bush on Thursday of taking the United States down a
``dangerous road’’ with pronouncements about American resolve to
defend Taiwan.

There is only one China in the world. Taiwan is part of China. It is not a protectorate of any foreign country,'' said Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Zhang Qiyue. The Chinese government and people are strongly indignant.’’

Meanwhile, Taiwan’s top diplomat in Washington, C.J. Chen, praised Bush’s
remarks and the president’s decision this week to approve the sale to
Taiwan of Kidd-class destroyers, up to eight diesel submarines, and 12 P-3
Orion submarine-killer aircraft.

We do look at this new government with a very positive perspective,'' Chen told a small group of American reporters. I think we are definitely
in a better situation with those newly acquired weapons.’’

On Wednesday, Bush said U.S. military force is certainly an option'' if China invades Taiwan. In response, Chen described the message as strong’’ but said ``we’ll have to wait and see’’ to determine whether it
represents a policy change.

It represents a welcome policy change to Sen. Jesse Helms, R-N.C.,
chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee.

Bush’s comment mercifully liberated us from the outdated notion of `strategic ambiguity,''' Helms said in a statement Thursday. China is arming and threatening more than ever to absorb Taiwan, he said, and it
is dangerous to continue to send mere ambiguous signals about the resolve
of the U.S. to defend Taiwan. Fuzzy, meaningless comments about the
resolve and the intentions of the United States invites miscalculation by
China, clearly a potential aggressor.’’

Chen declined several times to contrast Bush’s stance on Taiwan with that
of former President Clinton, who worked hard to improve ties with Beijing.

At another point, however, Chen noted that some high officials'' in the administration have said they do not look on Taiwan as a problem but as an opportunity.’’

On Capitol Hill, Secretary of State Colin Powell said Sino-American
relations have their positive aspects as well. While China is a ``serious
competitor’’ for influence in East Asia, Powell said the trading relations
between the two countries benefit both.

Listing such American stores as Home Depot, Office Depot and Kmart, Powell
said there are a lot of places where U.S. consumers get pretty good deals'' because of Chinese imports. At the same time, he said, The more
economic activity we give to the Chinese people, the less likely they are
to want to put that new wealth at risk.’’

We're not looking for enemies,'' Powell said. We don’t need enemies.
We want to be friends with anyone who wants to be friends with us.’’


Brian Wilmot http://www.jumpnow.net/ http://www.uglybillboards.com/ “You
can die but you’re never dead” - Red Hot Chili Peppers

“Brian Wilmot” <bwilmot@jumpnow.net> wrote in message
news:9cai72$ncg$1@constitution.worldwebserver.com
> I hate to bring it back up, but it refutes what many were saying.
> Intelligence was actually lost to the chinese…They should have bailed,
not
> land in a fucking enemy country…minute the media attention dies down
that
> pilot is toast.
>
> U.S. Secrets Lost From Spy Plane
>
> By GEORGE GEDDA .c The Associated Press
>
>
> WASHINGTON (AP) - Despite the best efforts of American crew members,
> U.S. secrets were lost to the Chinese when an American spy plane made an
> emergency landing in China, the Pentagon said Thursday.
>
> Asked at a briefing whether there was a loss of intelligence material,
Rear
> Adm. Craig Quigley said, We feel there was.''[/i] [i]>[/i] [i]> The EP-3E aircraft and a Chinese F-8 fighter jet collided April 1 over[/i] [i]> the South China Sea.[/i] [i]>[/i] [i]> The 24 American crewmen were released after 11 days but China has yet to[/i] [i]> surrender the plane, which was on an intelligence gathering mission.[/i] [i]>[/i] [i]> The crew did the best job they could with the time that they had after
the
> collision and before the plane touched down on Hainan island,’’ Quigley
> said. It wasn't perfect, but we feel they did the best job that they[/i] [i]> could.''[/i] [i]>[/i] [i]> The crew was questioned after their release by China and will be[/i] questioned [i]> again when they return from leaves of absence, Quigley said.[/i] [i]>[/i] [i]> Our understanding is not complete,’’ he said.
>
> Said Sen. Richard Shelby, R-Ala., chairman of the Senate Intelligence
> Committee: We've lost some ground, but I don't think it's irreparable.[/i] [i]> That's the chance you take when you have a reconnaissance plane like[/i] [i]> that that's gathering data.''[/i] [i]>[/i] [i]> Rep. Porter Goss, R-Fla., who as chairman of the House Intelligence[/i] [i]> Committee has had secret briefings on the incident, said the crew[/i] performed [i]> admirably but we have suffered some damage. … Is it[/i] [i]> devastating? No,[/i] I [i]> don't think so. But yes, I think it's significant.''[/i] [i]>[/i] [i]> Goss also said the Bush administration should return immediately to the[/i] air [i]> the unarmed, unescorted spy planes. Flights remain suspended[/i] [i]> indefinitely. Our business-as-usual reconnaissance should resume
> immediately, and it should be without any kind of patrol craft. We’re
> not armed. We’re not a threat to anybody. It’s all lawful and legal.’’
>
> The National Security Agency, the government office responsible for
> collecting electronic intelligence, is conducting a review of the
potential
> damage done by the loss of the top-secret aircraft, said government
> officials familiar with the study.
>
> The crew worked quickly to destroy their computerized gear and its
contents
> in the minutes between the collision and the time they were taken off
> the plane by Chinese soldiers, said one Defense Department official.
>
> They started through their checklist, which had five or six steps.[/i] [i]> They had everything electronically zeroed out,'' said the official.[/i] [i]>[/i] [i]> Another military official, who also spoke on condition of anonymity,[/i] [i]> said the crew was able to change key codes’’ for computerized
> information and smash hardware with hammers.

When I heard one of crewmembers say they had to take hand axes to use to
destroy there laptops I knew something was very wrong, my guess is that
the older equipment on the plane was connected to an automatic self
destruct button however the Navy to save money has added additional
portable equipment to the plane that was not connected to an autodestruct
switch and some of that was not destroyed. Think about how hard it would
be to make sure every hard drive in 12 laptops was completely destroyed in
less then 5 minutes using only a hand axe to do so, what a freaking joke
any loss of secrets should be blamed on the Admiral responsible for
outfitting and maintaining those types of aircraft and the guy should be
forced to retire at the least.


Gary Stein gestein@starpower.net http://www.mischealthaids.org

“Usenet is like a herd of performing elephants with diarrhea massive,
difficult to redirect, awe-inspiring, entertaining, and a source of mind-
boggling amounts of excrement when you least expect it.” (Gene Spafford)

>
> The spy plane incident damaged U.S. relations with China, and Beijing
> accused President Bush on Thursday of taking the United States down a
> dangerous road'' with pronouncements about American resolve to[/i] [i]> defend Taiwan.[/i] [i]>[/i] [i]> There is only one China in the world. Taiwan is part of China.
> It is not
a
> protectorate of any foreign country,’’ said Foreign Ministry spokeswoman
> Zhang Qiyue. The Chinese government and people are strongly[/i] [i]> indignant.''[/i] [i]>[/i] [i]> Meanwhile, Taiwan's top diplomat in Washington, C.J. Chen, praised[/i] [i]> Bush's remarks and the president's decision this week to approve[/i] [i]> the sale to[/i] Taiwan [i]> of Kidd-class destroyers, up to eight diesel submarines, and 12 P-3[/i] [i]> Orion submarine-killer aircraft.[/i] [i]>[/i] [i]> We do look at this new government with a very positive perspective,’’
Chen
> told a small group of American reporters. I think we are definitely in[/i] [i]> a better situation with those newly acquired weapons.''[/i] [i]>[/i] [i]> On Wednesday, Bush said U.S. military force is certainly an option’’
> if China invades Taiwan. In response, Chen described the message as
strong'' [i]> but said we’ll have to wait and see’’ to determine whether it[/i]
> represents
a
> policy change.
>
> It represents a welcome policy change to Sen. Jesse Helms, R-N.C.,
chairman
> of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee.
>
> Bush’s comment mercifully liberated us from the outdated notion of[/i] [i]> `strategic ambiguity,''' Helms said in a statement Thursday. China is[/i] arming [i]&gt; and threatening more than ever to absorb Taiwan, he said, and it is
> dangerous to continue to send mere ambiguous signals about the
> resolve of the U.S. to defend Taiwan. Fuzzy, meaningless comments
> about the resolve
and
> the intentions of the United States invites miscalculation by China,
clearly
> a potential aggressor.’’
>
> Chen declined several times to contrast Bush’s stance on Taiwan
> with that
of
> former President Clinton, who worked hard to improve ties with Beijing.
>
> At another point, however, Chen noted that some high officials'' in[/i] [i]> the administration have said they do not look on Taiwan as a problem but[/i] [i]> as an opportunity.’’
>
> On Capitol Hill, Secretary of State Colin Powell said Sino-American
> relations have their positive aspects as well. While China is a
> serious competitor'' for influence in East Asia, Powell said the[/i] [i]> trading relations between the two countries benefit both.[/i] [i]>[/i] [i]> Listing such American stores as Home Depot, Office Depot and Kmart,[/i] [i]> Powell said there are a lot of places where U.S. consumers get pretty
> good deals’’ because of Chinese imports. At the same time, he said,
> The more economic activity we give to the Chinese people, the less[/i] [i]> likely they are[/i] to [i]> want to put that new wealth at risk.''[/i] [i]>[/i] [i]> We’re not looking for enemies,’’ Powell said. ``We don’t need enemies.
We
> want to be friends with anyone who wants to be friends with us.’’
>
>
> –
> Brian Wilmot http://www.jumpnow.net/ http://www.uglybillboards.com/ "You
> can die but you’re never dead" - Red Hot Chili Peppers