Challenge

My seven year old son has hit upon the idea of getting a unicycle for Christmas.
I think it’s an excellent idea, so much so that I’m going to get one myself.

As neither of us have been near a uni before, the question is who is likely to
be up and riding the first?

A seven year old or a 36 year old IT consultant?

Why?

Re: Challenge

The 7 year old has the advantage of more free time to practice. But once you
both learn to ride it’s irrelevant becasue the advantage will go to the adult –
The adult will be able to aford more unicycle toys. Now just don’t go out and
spoil the kid with lots of unicycles. <g>

john_childs@hotmail.com

>From: “Jon And Eileen Roden” <widney.manor@virgin.net> As neither of us have
>been near a uni before, the question is who is likely to be up and riding
>the first?
>
>A seven year old or a 36 year old IT consultant?


Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

Re: Challenge

“Jon And Eileen Roden” <widney.manor@virgin.net> writes:

> As neither of us have been near a uni before, the question is who is likely to
> be up and riding the first? A seven year old or a 36 year old IT consultant?

Almost certainly the seven year old.

> Why?

Kids learn much faster than adults. You’ll have a head start, but your son won’t
have fear in his way.

Re: Challenge

>
>A seven year old or a 36 year old IT consultant?

The seven year old, why because its biological, young children just learn
faster. because their brains are still developing, and not shrinking
(sorry adults)

jeff

Re: Challenge

Hi Jon.

We have three boys, 11, 8 and 4. All three ride a unicycle, but I learned
first…when I was 12. <g>

-John at Unicycle.com

----- Original Message ----- From: Jon And Eileen Roden
<widney.manor@virgin.net> To: <unicycling@winternet.com> Sent: Monday, September
13, 1999 5:10 PM Subject: Challenge

> My seven year old son has hit upon the idea of getting a unicycle for
> Christmas. I think it’s an excellent idea, so much so that I’m going
> to get one
myself.
>
> As neither of us have been near a uni before, the question is who is
likely
> to be up and riding the first?
>
> A seven year old or a 36 year old IT consultant?
>
> Why?
>
>

Re: Challenge

> As neither of us have been near a uni before, the question is who is likely to
> be up and riding the first?
>
> A seven year old or a 36 year old IT consultant?

I was a 37 year old IT consultant when I started one son was 6 when he started
the other 5
( Ican’t say how old Janet was)

Who will learn first? The one who has the most fun

have lots

 Harold

        Harold Jarvie Wellington New Zealand hjarvie@bigfoot.com
        <a href="http://bigfoot.com/~hjarvie">http://bigfoot.com/~hjarvie</a>

Re: Challenge

Jon And Eileen Roden wrote in message
<7rjogk$dcc$1@nclient11-gui.server.virgin.net>…
>My seven year old son has hit upon the idea of getting a unicycle for
>Christmas. I think it’s an excellent idea, so much so that I’m going to get one
myself.
>
>As neither of us have been near a uni before, the question is who is likely to
>be up and riding the first?
>
>A seven year old or a 36 year old IT consultant?

Speaking as a 38 year old IT professional who learned to unicycle earlier this
year, and as the parent of a 7 year old, I’m going to give you the nod.

>Why?

Two reasons:

First, perseverance, discipline. You have it, your child probably doesn’t.
That’s the prime A-number-one thing I think it takes to learn to ride a
unicycle. A 7 year old may be very interested, but most that I know don’t stick
with anything very long. My daughter also has a unicycle (which she passionately
wanted after I learned to ride). She attempts it about once or twice a week.
She’s actually making some minor progress, but she just isn’t dedicated enough
to learn it very quickly. I’m not going to push her and make her dislike it.
She’s still having fun with her attempts (which I always help with), and I want
it to stay fun for her.

Second: Balance. You probably have the advantage of many years of walking,
bicycling, and perhaps some other activities which build your balance. My
daughter is just now learning to balance unassisted on her bicycle after a
couple of years of training wheels. She’s always been too fearful to take them
off before. Given that she can barely manage the side to side balance of the 2
wheel device, I think it’s going to be awhile before she can manage the “every
direction” balance required for the unicycle. I could be wrong.

That’s just my take on it.

Greg

Re: Challenge

Jon And Eileen Roden <widney.manor@virgin.net> writes
>
>Anyone know of any uni clubs in the UK?
>

If your in the London area there’s us:


Jonathan Marshall /| O O/ /|\ /| /|\ _/| / |\ LUNIs Unicycle Hockey Club
/| >>\ << |\ / E-mail rocket@jbmarshl.demon.co.uk /
| 0 _ o 0 |_/

Re: Challenge

I’ll second Greg’s opinion. If you want to improve your son’s odds, take him to
a unicycle club and let him see other young kids riding.

We gave our 4-year-old a unicycle a few months ago. He took visitors to the
garage to show it off, but when asked if he planned to ride it, he replied, “Of
course not!”

Then came the 4th of July parade in our town. My oldest son and I rode with Seth
Granberry’s Auburn (Alabama) Unicycle Club, including many 6- and 7-year-old
members. Our 4-year-old took notice. He’s been practicing ever since, and he’s
now riding about 7 feet, progressing about 1 foot per week. That is, when he
isn’t on his skateboard.

We posted some “tips for new unicyclists” on our FAQ page. Let us know if
this helps.

Regards, John at Unicycle.com

----- Original Message ----- From: Greg House <ghouse@southwind.REMOVEME.net>
To: <unicycling@winternet.com> Sent: Tuesday, September 14, 1999 9:50 PM
Subject: Re: Challenge

>
> Jon And Eileen Roden wrote in message
> <7rjogk$dcc$1@nclient11-gui.server.virgin.net>…
> >My seven year old son has hit upon the idea of getting a unicycle for
> >Christmas. I think it’s an excellent idea, so much so that I’m going to
> >get one
> myself.
> >
> >As neither of us have been near a uni before, the question is who is
likely
> >to be up and riding the first?
> >
> >A seven year old or a 36 year old IT consultant?
>
>
> Speaking as a 38 year old IT professional who learned to unicycle earlier this
> year, and as the parent of a 7 year old, I’m going to give you the
nod.
>
> >Why?
>
> Two reasons:
>
> First, perseverance, discipline. You have it, your child probably doesn’t.
> That’s the prime A-number-one thing I think it takes to learn to ride a
> unicycle. A 7 year old may be very interested, but most that I know don’t
> stick with anything very long. My daughter also has a unicycle (which she
> passionately wanted after I learned to ride). She attempts it about once
or
> twice a week. She’s actually making some minor progress, but she just
isn’t
> dedicated enough to learn it very quickly. I’m not going to push her and make
> her dislike it. She’s still having fun with her attempts (which I always help
> with), and I want it to stay fun for her.
>
> Second: Balance. You probably have the advantage of many years of walking,
> bicycling, and perhaps some other activities which build your balance. My
> daughter is just now learning to balance unassisted on her bicycle after a
> couple of years of training wheels. She’s always been too fearful to take them
> off before. Given that she can barely manage the side to side balance of the 2
> wheel device, I think it’s going to be awhile before she can
manage
> the “every direction” balance required for the unicycle. I could be wrong.
>
> That’s just my take on it.
>
> Greg
>
>

Re: Challenge

Thanks for the advise.

I can’t wait to give it a go.

Anyone know of any uni clubs in the UK?

Jon