Centenarian Unicycle Club! (was: Why live?)

John Foss wrote…
>I actually never thought of it that way. I have long held, as one of my
>personal goals, to ride a unicycle on my hundredth birthday. The point of
>this is more to have the hundredth birthday than to be able to ride, though.
>I’ll be happy with the birthday. But I believe (I have faith) that it’s
>possible, if I take care of myself and if my body is genetically blessed
>enough to hold up to the ravages of time.

John, it is very interesting that you should say that at this time. To tell you
the truth, I have been planning for some time to found the “Centenarian Unicycle
Club” and create a website to get members. There is only one qualification to join:
the desire to ride a unicycle at the age of 100.

There will be various ranks, with the highest award going to those who can
actually ride at 100. But just living to 100 will be awarded too, even if you
can’t ride. You will see, this is going to real interesting.

By the way, I rode with Yoshito Suzuki, who built the first unicycle in Japan back
in 1910 (1912) when he was 86! I think that Mell Hall is in his 90s and still rides?!

John, since you have expressed a desire to ride at 100, I invite you to become
a founding member. I assure you that we will succeed, just as we did with the IUF!

>But surely most of us will have to give up the unicycle at some point before
>we die, as long as we don’t die suddenly.

If we are going to discuss life and death I have a silly but important request.
Please don’t talk about death in reference to me personally. I have this
irrational fear and aversion to it being put in words, as if those words could
have a magical effect.

By the way, my wife and I “plan” to live to the age of 117 or 118 – way before that
time, according to the famous books “The Age of Spiritual Machines”, it will be possible
– now hear this – to download your brain to a computer … looong story. Read the
book.

>> Most of the time, effects in the physical body
>> are results from some type of action in the
>> spirit realm.
>
>That can of course be debated, and hard to prove. But what is widely known
>is that one’s own mental attitude has a big effect on one’s physical and
>mental health. If you have a purpose, you will be stronger. Changing

I absolutely agree. Riding a unicycle at age 100 is a noble goal. If you convince
yourself and believe that you can do it, your mind and body may follow suit.

John Foss! I HEREBY INVITE YOU TO DO A PAIRS ROUTINE WITH ME
AT AROUND UNICON XXXVIII?, when we are both over 100.

Deal!? Let’s shake on that!! I am dead serious.

>purposes is something many people have to face in their lives, either when
>somebody dies, or a career changes, or other things happen. I’m sure we all
>with Jay luck and happiness in his own search.
>
>Stay on top,
>John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone
>jfoss@unicycling.com
>www.unicycling.com
>
>
>“You’re not supposed to wash your Roach armor” - Nathan Hoover, on safety
>equipment cleaning methods
>
>
>___________________________________________________________________________
>rec.sport.unicycling mailing list - www.unicycling.org/mailman/listinfo/rsu
>

Regards, Jack Halpern
President, The CJK Dictionary Institute, Inc.
http://www.cjk.org Phone: +81-48-473-3508

RE: Centenarian Unicycle Club! (was: Why live?)

> John, it is very interesting that you should say that at this
> time. To tell you
> the truth, I have been planning for some time to found the
> “Centenarian Unicycle
> Club” and create a website to get members. There is only
> one qualification to join:
> the desire to ride a unicycle at the age of 100.

Sign me up! I hope to be listed as a “founding member” or something similar
meaning I don’t have to do any work. But I thought it up. Remember including
it in the daily newsletter that the Japan team was making back at UNICON VI?

> There will be various ranks, with the highest award going to
> those who can actually ride at 100. But just living to 100
> will be awarded too, even if you can’t ride. You will see,
> this is going to real interesting.

Well why not award people for living long? Though I expect the majority of
credit for getting there must go to your parents (and their parents, etc.),
taking care of yourself should at least improve your quality of life at such
an age.

> in 1910 (1912) when he was 86! I think that Mell Hall is in
> his 90s and still rides?!

I’m afraid Mel Hall is no longer with us. He died within the last couple of
years, I believe in a fire in his trailer. As far as I know, he could still
ride at the time.

> By the way, my wife and I “plan” to live to the age of 117 or
> 118 – way before that
> time, according to the famous books “The Age of Spiritual
> Machines”, it will be possible
> – now hear this – to download your brain to a computer …

Sign me up for that too. Then if the real one “crashes” maybe I’ll be
covered. Or maybe I can use it if I have Alzheimer’s?

> John Foss! I HEREBY INVITE YOU TO DO A PAIRS ROUTINE WITH ME
> AT AROUND UNICON XXXVIII?, when we are both over 100.
> Deal!? Let’s shake on that!! I am dead serious.

Eew. My hope is that long before then, you will not be able to compete in
artistic events at a UNICON unless you are good :slight_smile: It will take the
world a long time to forget your “WWU” (World War Unicycle) bloodbath at
UNICON X…

I remember when John Lizza (the blind guy) did a little performance at the
USA Nationals in 1983. He came out and rode around, to the cheers of the
audience. He did not have to enter it as a competition performance and
suffer judges to rank it. In other words, we can just go out there and ride,
unannounced, and have fun being chased off by security. :slight_smile:

Stay on top,
John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone
jfoss@unicycling.com