Calling all Cokerheads - my Coker's getting too much verbal abuse...

I have a Coker… I can free mount on the flat… I can free mount going down
hill… I can’t, however, get the blasted thing going up hill :frowning:

I do a rolling mount starting with the pedals at 3 and 9. Best foot on the near
pedal. A small roll forward brings the near pedal up as I launch forward and up
while holding on to the seat. While still holding the seat and with 50 / 50
weight on the pedals and seat the beast thunders off. Once I’m under way the
seat is released and all’s swell. Not when it’s up hill though. Getting the
wheel rolling just ain’t happening. I think I’ve hit the
psychological barrier of thinking “I can’t do this” - not something I (or most
unicyclists for that matter) usually say - which is worrying.

So, all you Cokerheads out there - how d’you do it??? Hang on to the seat
without putting your weight on it and push like crazy?

Cheerly, Neil

Re: Calling all Cokerheads - my Coker’s getting too much verbal abuse…

Greetings

In message “Calling all Cokerheads - my Coker’s getting too much verbal
abuse…”, Neil Dunlop wrote…
>I have a Coker… I can free mount on the flat… I can free mount going down
>hill… I can’t, however, get the blasted thing going up hill :frowning:
>
>I do a rolling mount starting with the pedals at 3 and 9. Best foot on the
>near pedal. A small roll forward brings the near pedal up as I launch forward
>and up while holding on to the seat. While still holding the seat and with 50
>/ 50 weight on the pedals and seat the beast thunders off. Once I’m under way
>the seat is released and all’s swell. Not when it’s up hill though. Getting
>the wheel rolling just ain’t happening. I think I’ve hit the
>psychological barrier of thinking “I can’t do this” - not something I (or most
> unicyclists for that matter) usually say - which is worrying.

I can do it, but not if the hill is too steep. The trick is to get some speed,
and once you hit the pedals to lean all the way forward, and pedal hard with all
your weight on the pedals.

>So, all you Cokerheads out there - how d’you do it??? Hang on to the seat
>without putting your weight on it and push like crazy?
>
>Cheerly, Neil
>
>
>
>

Regards, Jack Halpern CJK Dictionary Publishing Society, http://www.kanji.org
Voice: +81-48-481-3103 Fax: +81-48-479-1323

Re: Calling all Cokerheads - my Coker’s getting too much verbal abuse…

Hi Cokerheads,

Freemounts on hills are only difficult if you try a running mount. Try the “Eric
Mount” hold the tyre when you mount and then pivot yourself up on to the seat
using your hand to hold the wheel steady. This way it does not matter how long
your cranks are. Of course if the hill is seriously steep then you will not be
able to get yourself moving, but this where you must hold the seat to get the
power to push the pedals. I have not found a hill that has foiled me yet with my
Coker and 110 cranks. (I have free mounted on a local hill to me that is 1:5).
Practice Neil!

Cheers

Roger


 The UK's Unicycle Source <a href="http://www.unicycle.uk.com/">http://www.unicycle.uk.com/</a>

----- Original Message ----- From: “Neil Dunlop” <n.dunlop@kildrummy.co.uk>
To: “Unicycle Newsgroup” <unicycling@winternet.com> Sent: Tuesday, August 22,
2000 3:19 PM Subject: Calling all Cokerheads - my Coker’s getting too much
verbal abuse…

> I have a Coker… I can free mount on the flat… I can free mount going down
> hill… I can’t, however, get the blasted thing going up hill :frowning:
>
> I do a rolling mount starting with the pedals at 3 and 9. Best foot on the
> near pedal. A small roll forward brings the near pedal up as I launch forward
> and up while holding on to the seat. While still holding the seat and with 50
> / 50 weight on the pedals and seat the beast thunders off.
Once
> I’m under way the seat is released and all’s swell. Not when it’s up hill
> though. Getting the wheel rolling just ain’t happening. I think I’ve hit
the
> psychological barrier of thinking “I can’t do this” - not something I (or most
> unicyclists for that matter) usually say - which is worrying.
>
> So, all you Cokerheads out there - how d’you do it??? Hang on to the seat
> without putting your weight on it and push like crazy?
>
> Cheerly, Neil
>

Re: Calling all Cokerheads - my Coker’s getting too much verbal abuse…

“Neil Dunlop” <n.dunlop@kildrummy.co.uk> wrote in message
news:LAEOIAKHMFAECKPLEGMAGEMPCBAA.n.dunlop@kildrummy.co.uk
> I have a Coker… I can free mount on the flat… I can free mount going down
> hill… I can’t, however, get the blasted thing going up hill :frowning:
>
> I do a rolling mount starting with the pedals at 3 and 9. Best foot on the
> near pedal. A small roll forward brings the near pedal up as I launch forward
> and up while holding on to the seat. While still holding the seat and with 50
> / 50 weight on the pedals and seat the beast thunders off.
Once
> I’m under way the seat is released and all’s swell. Not when it’s up hill
> though. Getting the wheel rolling just ain’t happening. I think I’ve hit
the
> psychological barrier of thinking “I can’t do this” - not something I (or most
> unicyclists for that matter) usually say - which is worrying.
>
> So, all you Cokerheads out there - how d’you do it??? Hang on to the seat
> without putting your weight on it and push like crazy?
>
> Cheerly, Neil

When freemounting on an uphill, if it isn’t very steep, I just give a HUGE jump
up and go for it. I have the normal 6" cranks rather than short ones, and I have
long legs, and this usually works. If it’s a steep uphill, I turn sideways,
mount, then do a quick 90 degree turn and crank hard up the hill. I can do this
on quite steep inclines - lots of practice from Muni!

—Nathan

RE: Calling all Cokerheads - my Coker’s getting too much verbal abuse…

Just read my horoscope (not a usual activity) for the day… It reads “You are
smart today. You are capable of learning quickly. If you do the reading and
watch an expert, you will acquire the skills you admire. A high level of
accomplishment is required to maintain the position to which you aspire. So,
practice!”

Today’s the day I guess :slight_smile:

Neil

-----Original Message----- From: Neil Dunlop [mailto:n.dunlop@kildrummy.co.uk]
Sent: 22 August 2000 15:20 To: Unicycle Newsgroup Subject: Calling all
Cokerheads - my Coker’s getting too much verbal abuse…

I have a Coker… I can free mount on the flat… I can free mount going down
hill… I can’t, however, get the blasted thing going up hill :frowning:

I do a rolling mount starting with the pedals at 3 and 9. Best foot on the near
pedal. A small roll forward brings the near pedal up as I launch forward and up
while holding on to the seat. While still holding the seat and with 50 / 50
weight on the pedals and seat the beast thunders off. Once I’m under way the
seat is released and all’s swell. Not when it’s up hill though. Getting the
wheel rolling just ain’t happening. I think I’ve hit the
psychological barrier of thinking “I can’t do this” - not something I (or most
unicyclists for that matter) usually say - which is worrying.

So, all you Cokerheads out there - how d’you do it??? Hang on to the seat
without putting your weight on it and push like crazy?

Cheerly, Neil

Re: Calling all Cokerheads - my Coker’s getting too much verbal

Hi!

In my humble opinion, it is very difficult to freemount the Coker uphill. If you
have shorter than stock crank arms it’s nearly impossible. You might try to
start with your first pedal (dominant foot) even higher than you do when you’re
on the flat surface(if your foot can reach that high). It sounds like you mount
like I do (without letting the wheel roll backwards much). Also, get your upper
body weight as far forward as possible as fast as possible. On the uphill mount,
the wheel is going to roll back some. The only other thing I can think of is
maybe your non-dominant foot is too far away from the wheel when you start.

The thing that helped me most when learning to freemount my Coker was to
freemount on the sand at the beach. It taught me to be real aggressive and start
riding immediately as soon as my second foot hit the pedal and before I could
sink in the sand.

Hope this helps.

-Mark

— “Neil Dunlop” <n.dunlop@kildrummy.co.uk>
> wrote: I have a Coker… I can free mount on the flat… I can free mount
> going down hill… I can’t, however, get the blasted thing going up hill :frowning:
>
>I do a rolling mount starting with the pedals at 3 and 9. Best foot on the near
>pedal. A small roll forward brings the near pedal up as I launch forward and up
>while holding on to the seat. While still holding the seat and with 50 / 50
>weight on the pedals and seat the beast thunders off. Once I’m under way the
>seat is released and all’s swell. Not when it’s up hill though. Getting the
>wheel rolling just ain’t happening. I think I’ve hit the
>psychological barrier of thinking “I can’t do this” - not something I (or most
> unicyclists for that matter) usually say - which is worrying.
>
>So, all you Cokerheads out there - how d’you do it??? Hang on to the seat
>without putting your weight on it and push like crazy?
>
>Cheerly, Neil


Free e-Mail and Webspace - http://Unicyclist.com

RE: Calling all Cokerheads - my Coker’s getting too much verbal abuse…

Hi Mark,

Can you have a humble opinion - with an email address like that on a subject
like this :wink:

Sounds like good advice! During a normal mount the wheel does roll back ever so
slightly (from about 8 to 9 on a clock face) so stopping this from happening
will make a hell of a difference to that first push.

One thing I learned early on was to try and have the trailing foot as close to
the wheel. My leg is level with the back of the wheel - should it be closer
than this?

Sadly all the beaches near me are of the stone variety so I don’t think I’ll be
going there to practice :wink:

Neil

-----Original Message----- From: Cokerhead@unicyclist.com
[mailto:Cokerhead@unicyclist.com] Sent: 22 August 2000 16:26 To:
n.dunlop@kildrummy.co.uk; unicycling@winternet.com Subject: Re: Calling all
Cokerheads - my Coker’s getting too much verbal abuse…

Hi!

In my humble opinion, it is very difficult to freemount the Coker uphill. If you
have shorter than stock crank arms it’s nearly impossible.

You might try to start with your first pedal (dominant foot) even higher than
you do when you’re on the flat surface(if your foot can reach that high). It
sounds like you mount like I do (without letting the wheel roll backwards much).
Also, get your upper body weight as far forward as possible as fast as possible.
On the uphill mount, the wheel is going to roll back some. The only other thing
I can think of is maybe your non-dominant foot is too far away from the wheel
when you start.

The thing that helped me most when learning to freemount my Coker was to
freemount on the sand at the beach. It taught me to be real aggressive and start
riding immediately as soon as my second foot hit the pedal and before I could
sink in the sand.

Hope this helps.

-Mark

— “Neil Dunlop” <n.dunlop@kildrummy.co.uk>

>> wrote:

>>I have a Coker…

>>I can free mount on the flat…

>>I can free mount going down hill…

>>I can’t, however, get the blasted thing going up hill :frowning:

>>

>>I do a rolling mount starting with the pedals at 3 and 9. Best foot on
>the

>>near pedal. A small roll forward brings the near pedal up as I launch

>>forward and up while holding on to the seat. While still holding the seat

>>and with 50 / 50 weight on the pedals and seat the beast thunders off.
>Once

>>I’m under way the seat is released and all’s swell. Not when it’s up hill

>>though. Getting the wheel rolling just ain’t happening. I think I’ve hit
>the

>>psychological barrier of thinking “I can’t do this” - not something I (or

>>most unicyclists for that matter) usually say - which is worrying.

>>

>>So, all you Cokerheads out there - how d’you do it??? Hang on to the seat

>>without putting your weight on it and push like crazy?

>>

>>Cheerly,

>>Neil


Free e-Mail and Webspace - http://Unicyclist.com

RE: Calling all Cokerheads - my Coker’s getting too much verbal a

> I’m under way the seat is released and all’s swell. Not when it’s up hill
> though. Getting the wheel rolling just ain’t happening. I think I’ve hit the
> psychological barrier of thinking “I can’t do this” - not something I (or most
> unicyclists for that matter) usually say - which is worrying.

When going uphill, your balance envelope gets smaller. Add this to the fact that
you have to work harder, especially to get the heavy wheel moving, and you have
a much more difficult mounting situation.

The balance envelope is smaller because as the hill gets steeper, the area of
“vertical” that’s useful for you to ride in gets progressively squashed. So you
need to lean farther forward, but not so much that you can’t keep the wheel
coming with you. And it must be hard getting that wheel started.

When I mount my big wheel, I’m moving forward and the wheel stops while I jump
up. Then I get it going again to match my forward speed, which is usually pretty
slow as I usually only ride it in shows these days (hey, the tire is rock
hard!). If you practice starting off more slowly it might help. Then you can
separate the jumping up part from the riding away part. It will still be harder
due to the hill though.

Have fun practicing, John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone http://www.unicycling.com

“China put the ‘K’ in quality.” - Woody Hooten, USA Team member, commenting on
his experiences in China for UNICON X

Re: Calling all Cokerheads - my Coker’s getting too much verbal a

Greetings

In message “RE: Calling all Cokerheads - my Coker’s getting too much verbal a
buse…”, John Foss wrote…
>
>
>When going uphill, your balance envelope gets smaller. Add this to the fact
>that you have to work harder, especially to get the heavy wheel moving, and
>you have a much more difficult mounting situation.
>
>The balance envelope is smaller because as the hill gets steeper, the area of
>“vertical” that’s useful for you to ride in gets progressively squashed. So
>you need to lean farther forward, but not so much that you can’t keep the
>wheel coming with you. And it must be hard getting that wheel started.
>
>When I mount my big wheel, I’m moving forward and the wheel stops while I jump
>up. Then I get it going again to match my forward speed, which is usually
>pretty slow as I usually only ride it in shows these days (hey, the tire is
>rock hard!). If you practice starting off more slowly it might help. Then you
>can separate the jumping up part from the riding away part. It will still be
>harder due to the hill though.

I’ll just add one more cent to this excellent description. Have the wheel face
the hill at an angle, or even sideways. And remember. put ALL your weight on the
pedals as you lean considerably forward.

>Have fun practicing, John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone http://www.unicycling.com
>
>“China put the ‘K’ in quality.” - Woody Hooten, USA Team member, commenting on
>his experiences in China for UNICON X
>
>

Regards, Jack Halpern CJK Dictionary Publishing Society, http://www.kanji.org
Voice: +81-48-481-3103 Fax: +81-48-479-1323

RE: Calling all Cokerheads - my Coker’s getting too much verbal

Ok, I had to go jump on my Coker to look at my leg to answer this. I THINK that
the higher you get your dominant foot automatically brings the other foot
closer to the wheel. If it feels like your trailing foot is going up instead of
forward a lot, that’s probably close enough. On the uphill, it’s going to be
more like you were starting with a 8 oclock 2 oclock position on the flat. The
difference is the hill is against you and you have to get over it fast. Maybe
if you practice 8 oclock 2 oclock on the flat it would help when you try to
mount uphill.

For the record, I avoid uphill mounts most of the time!

-Mark — “Neil Dunlop” <n.dunlop@kildrummy.co.uk>
> wrote:
> Hi Mark,
>
>Can you have a humble opinion - with an email address like that on a subject
>like this :wink:
>
>Sounds like good advice! During a normal mount the wheel does roll back ever so
>slightly (from about 8 to 9 on a clock face) so stopping this from happening
>will make a hell of a difference to that first push.
>
>One thing I learned early on was to try and have the trailing foot as close to
>the wheel. My leg is level with the back of the wheel - should it be closer
>than this?
>
>Sadly all the beaches near me are of the stone variety so I don’t think I’ll be
>going there to practice :wink:
>
>Neil
>
>-----Original Message----- From: Cokerhead@unicyclist.com
>[mailto:Cokerhead@unicyclist.com] Sent: 22 August 2000 16:26 To:
>n.dunlop@kildrummy.co.uk; unicycling@winternet.com Subject: Re: Calling all
>Cokerheads - my Coker’s getting too much verbal abuse…
>
>Hi!
>
>
>
>In my humble opinion, it is very difficult to freemount the Coker uphill. If
>you have shorter than stock crank arms it’s nearly impossible.
>
>You might try to start with your first pedal (dominant foot) even higher than
>you do when you’re on the flat surface(if your foot can reach that high). It
>sounds like you mount like I do (without letting the wheel roll backwards
>much). Also, get your upper body weight as far forward as possible as fast as
>possible. On the uphill mount, the wheel is going to roll back some. The only
>other thing I can think of is maybe your non-dominant foot is too far away from
>the wheel when you start.
>
>
>
>The thing that helped me most when learning to freemount my Coker was to
>freemount on the sand at the beach. It taught me to be real aggressive and
>start riding immediately as soon as my second foot hit the pedal and before I
>could sink in the sand.
>
>
>
>Hope this helps.
>
>
>
>-Mark
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>— “Neil Dunlop” <n.dunlop@kildrummy.co.uk>
>
>>> wrote:
>
>>>I have a Coker…
>
>>>I can free mount on the flat…
>
>>>I can free mount going down hill…
>
>>>I can’t, however, get the blasted thing going up hill :frowning:
>
>>>
>
>>>I do a rolling mount starting with the pedals at 3 and 9. Best foot on
>>the
>
>>>near pedal. A small roll forward brings the near pedal up as I launch
>
>>>forward and up while holding on to the seat. While still holding the seat
>
>>>and with 50 / 50 weight on the pedals and seat the beast thunders off.
>>Once
>
>>>I’m under way the seat is released and all’s swell. Not when it’s up hill
>
>>>though. Getting the wheel rolling just ain’t happening. I think I’ve hit
>>the
>
>>>psychological barrier of thinking “I can’t do this” - not something I (or
>
>>>most unicyclists for that matter) usually say - which is worrying.
>
>>>
>
>>>So, all you Cokerheads out there - how d’you do it??? Hang on to the seat
>
>>>without putting your weight on it and push like crazy?
>
>>>
>
>>>Cheerly,
>
>>>Neil
>
>_____________________________________________________________
>Free e-Mail and Webspace - http://Unicyclist.com


Free e-Mail and Webspace - http://Unicyclist.com

Re: Calling all Cokerheads - my Coker’s getting too much verbal

Thanks Roger, Have you ever tried holding your brake instead of the tire? I
thought I had graduated from holding the tire mount long ago but it makes sense
on a hill. -Mark

— “unicycleSourceUK” <Roger@unicycle.uk.com>
> wrote: Hi Cokerheads,
>
>Freemounts on hills are only difficult if you try a running mount. Try the
>“Eric Mount” hold the tyre when you mount and then pivot yourself up on to the
>seat using your hand to hold the wheel steady. This way it does not matter how
>long your cranks are. Of course if the hill is seriously steep then you will
>not be able to get yourself moving, but this where you must hold the seat to
>get the power to push the pedals. I have not found a hill that has foiled me
>yet with my Coker and 110 cranks. (I have free mounted on a local hill to me
>that is 1:5). Practice Neil!
>
>Cheers
>
>Roger
>
>--------------------------------------------
> The UK’s Unicycle Source http://www.unicycle.uk.com/
>--------------------------------------------
>----- Original Message ----- From: “Neil Dunlop” <n.dunlop@kildrummy.co.uk>
>To: “Unicycle Newsgroup” <unicycling@winternet.com> Sent: Tuesday, August 22,
>2000 3:19 PM Subject: Calling all Cokerheads - my Coker’s getting too much
>verbal abuse…
>
>
>> I have a Coker… I can free mount on the flat… I can free mount going down
>> hill… I can’t, however, get the blasted thing going up hill :frowning:
>>
>> I do a rolling mount starting with the pedals at 3 and 9. Best foot on the
>> near pedal. A small roll forward brings the near pedal up as I launch forward
>> and up while holding on to the seat. While still holding the seat and with 50
>> / 50 weight on the pedals and seat the beast thunders off.
>Once
>> I’m under way the seat is released and all’s swell. Not when it’s up hill
>> though. Getting the wheel rolling just ain’t happening. I think I’ve hit
>the
>> psychological barrier of thinking “I can’t do this” - not something I (or
>> most unicyclists for that matter) usually say - which is worrying.
>>
>> So, all you Cokerheads out there - how d’you do it??? Hang on to the seat
>> without putting your weight on it and push like crazy?
>>
>> Cheerly, Neil
>>
>>


Free e-Mail and Webspace - http://Unicyclist.com

Re: Calling all Cokerheads - my Coker’s getting too much verbal

hey Neil, I’ve read everyone elses responses and I figure I might as well give
mine. If your wheel is facing straight up the hill why not turn the unicycle
ninety degrees where you’re facing the side of the road. Here you’re basically
on flat ground. Mount your usual way and do a quick turn into the hill and start
leaning forward and pedaling like crazy. Another option that I use is turn all
the way around and mount facing down the hill and do a quick turn around and go
up the hill. Hope this helps.

Aj

Re: Calling all Cokerheads - my Coker’s getting too much verbal

Hey Mark, Damn, man. Five tires!? What the hell have you been doing on that
thing? I’ve ridden one where the whole tire went smooth but I ended up changing
it out before the tire blew because the tube blew first. I just got my
registration packet for the Oklahoma ride and I was wondering if I can pick up
my packet the day of the race? The two designated days are earlier in the week.
I was also wondering if I came up at the earliest Thursday would I be able to
sleep on your floor or something? I’ll be glad to get a hotel if it’s a problem.
Anxiously awaiting the arrival of my Roach Seat Cover. Hopefully this ride will
be much more pain free than the ride in April. Later on, dude.

Aj

p.s. There are no hills that are too steep to climb. I also liked what you said
about just not stopping on hills.

Re: Calling all Cokerheads - my Coker’s getting too much verbal abuse…

Mark,

I generally do not use the brake because it is not as easily available as the
wheel. I would also worry that the brake would not release when I want it to be;
mine is a drag brake and stays on until it is taken off. I will give it a try
though - definitely better when the tyre is wet. What I do use my brake for when
I am feeling lazy is stopping. I take my feet off the cranks, then lean back
with the brake on until I am stopped. Really nice feeling.

Roger

 The UK's Unicycle Source <a href="http://www.unicycle.uk.com/">http://www.unicycle.uk.com/</a>

----- Original Message ----- From: “Mark Stephens” <Cokerhead@unicyclist.com>
To: “unicycleSourceUK” <Roger@unicycle.uk.com>; <unicycling@winternet.com> Sent:
Tuesday, August 22, 2000 5:43 PM Subject: Re: Calling all Cokerheads - my
Coker’s getting too much verbal abuse…

> Thanks Roger, Have you ever tried holding your brake instead of the tire? I
> thought I
had graduated from holding the tire mount long ago but it makes sense on a hill.
> -Mark
>
> — “unicycleSourceUK” <Roger@unicycle.uk.com>
> > wrote: Hi Cokerheads,
> >
> >Freemounts on hills are only difficult if you try a running mount. Try
the
> >“Eric Mount” hold the tyre when you mount and then pivot yourself up on
to
> >the seat using your hand to hold the wheel steady. This way it does not
> >matter how long your cranks are. Of course if the hill is seriously steep
> >then you will not be able to get yourself moving, but this where you must
> >hold the seat to get the power
to
> >push the pedals. I have not found a hill that has foiled me yet with my Coker
> >and 110
cranks.
> >(I have free mounted on a local hill to me that is 1:5). Practice Neil!
> >
> >Cheers
> >
> >Roger
> >
> >--------------------------------------------
> > The UK’s Unicycle Source http://www.unicycle.uk.com/
> >--------------------------------------------
> >----- Original Message ----- From: “Neil Dunlop” <n.dunlop@kildrummy.co.uk>
> >To: “Unicycle Newsgroup” <unicycling@winternet.com> Sent: Tuesday, August 22,
> >2000 3:19 PM Subject: Calling all Cokerheads - my Coker’s getting too much
> >verbal abuse…
> >
> >
> >> I have a Coker… I can free mount on the flat… I can free mount going
> >> down hill… I can’t, however, get the blasted thing going up hill :frowning:
> >>
> >> I do a rolling mount starting with the pedals at 3 and 9. Best foot on
the
> >> near pedal. A small roll forward brings the near pedal up as I launch
> >> forward and up while holding on to the seat. While still holding the
seat
> >> and with 50 / 50 weight on the pedals and seat the beast thunders off.
> >Once
> >> I’m under way the seat is released and all’s swell. Not when it’s up
hill
> >> though. Getting the wheel rolling just ain’t happening. I think I’ve
hit
> >the
> >> psychological barrier of thinking “I can’t do this” - not something I
(or
> >> most unicyclists for that matter) usually say - which is worrying.
> >>
> >> So, all you Cokerheads out there - how d’you do it??? Hang on to the
seat
> >> without putting your weight on it and push like crazy?
> >>
> >> Cheerly, Neil
> >>
> >>
>
> _____________________________________________________________
> Free e-Mail and Webspace - http://Unicyclist.com

RE: Calling all Cokerheads - my Coker’s getting too much verbal abuse…

Cheers, Aj. Slight problem as most of the roads up here are single track and
invariably have large bushes of nettles on either side so any form of quick turn
takes on new danger levels. A 180 is probably not an option in most cases but
I’ll give the 90 degree a go - watching very closely for those nettles :wink:

Neil

-----Original Message----- From: jugglerjoe@webtv.net
[mailto:jugglerjoe@webtv.net] Sent: 22 August 2000 18:25 To:
unicycling@winternet.com Subject: Re: Calling all Cokerheads - my Coker’s
getting too much verbal abuse… Importance: Low

hey Neil, I’ve read everyone elses responses and I figure I might as well give
mine. If your wheel is facing straight up the hill why not turn the unicycle
ninety degrees where you’re facing the side of the road. Here you’re basically
on flat ground. Mount your usual way and do a quick turn into the hill and start
leaning forward and pedaling like crazy. Another option that I use is turn all
the way around and mount facing down the hill and do a quick turn around and go
up the hill. Hope this helps.

Aj

Re: Calling all Cokerheads - my Coker’s getting too much verbal a

John Foss <john_foss@asinet.com> wrote:

>When going uphill, your balance envelope gets smaller. Add this to the fact
>that you have to work harder, especially to get the heavy wheel moving, and you
>have a much more difficult mounting situation.

>The balance envelope is smaller because as the hill gets steeper, the area of
>“vertical” that’s useful for you to ride in gets progressively squashed. So you
>need to lean farther forward, but not so much that you can’t keep the wheel
>coming with you. And it must be hard getting that wheel started.

I’d suggest that the forward half of the balance envelope gets smaller and the
backward half of the balance envelope gets bigger when going up a hill.
Conversely, the forward half of the balance envelope gets bigger and the
backward half of the balance envelope gets smaller when going down a hill. In
other words, it is easier to slow down going up a hill than it is to speed up
going up a hill and it is easier to speed up going down a hill than it is to
slow down going down a hill.

The balance envelope probably does get smaller overall going up a hill as John
stated, but I think the asymmetry of the balance envelope when going up hill or
even going down hill is a much more important factor. A large amount of room on
one side of the balance point is made less useful by a very small amount of room
on the other side of the balance point.

Asymmetry of the balance envelope when going down a hill is sure to be a big
factor in the balance system of a unicycle, but does the balance envelope get
bigger, remain the same, or get smaller overall when going down a hill? Don’t
forget that the asymmetry of the balance envelope will probably have more
effect than overall balance envelope size when going down hill (as well as
going up hill).

Sincerely,

Ken Fuchs <kfuchs@winternet.com>

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