Building Arm Strength?

I like to help people learn to ride, so I will often ride with beginners. But I’ve found that they tend to put quite a bit of weight on my arm as they hang on to my hand to ride.

Both my arms are now sore, but the right one hurts enough that I have trouble opening a door. I think it’s comparable to tennis elbow, but I don’t play tennis.

I guess I’ll have to take a break from helping people ride until my arms don’t hurt. Besides not giving beginners a helping hand, any other suggestions on how to deal with this?

Thanks.

Carol
Minnesota

Re: Building Arm Strength?

Carol McLean wrote:
> I like to help people learn to ride, so I will often ride with
> beginners. But I’ve found that they tend to put quite a bit of weight
> on my arm as they hang on to my hand to ride.
>
> Both my arms are now sore, but the right one hurts enough that I have
> trouble opening a door. I think it’s comparable to tennis elbow, but
> I don’t play tennis.
>
> I guess I’ll have to take a break from helping people ride until my
> arms don’t hurt. Besides not giving beginners a helping hand, any
> other suggestions on how to deal with this?
>
> Thanks.
>
> Carol
> Minnesota

The lifter and massage therapist has his usual suggestions. :wink:

Freeze a couple of Styrofoam cups full of water and do self ice massage on
the sore arm.


Do not do to others what angers you if done to you by others.
–Socrates

Have Kelsey do the “manual” labor. You’re the brains of the outfit.

Ice massage was a big help for my torn ligaments. It relieves pain and swelling very nicely.

Another alternative to holding someone’s hand is to get them to put their arm on your shoulder instead. I do this with some of the “heavy leaner” learners who are putting too much weight on my arm. It gives them a bit more of a solid support than just my arm and then I can go back out to the arm once they get more balanced.

Don’t forget to tell people who are learning to have their weight on the seat. Most learners forget this and need to be reminded constantly.

Also try and avoid solo helping if you can. You’ll find things easier on your arm if there is someone else helping on the other side of the learner.

Re: Building Arm Strength?

I helped my daughter learn by holding my forearm out level and then pointing
my index and middle finger out to the side for her to hold on to. She would
grab those two fingers (she refused to hold just one finger because of
something that happened with grandpa) and then put her elbow on top of my
forearm (close to my elbow). A lot more power or endurance can go through
an elbow.

As she gained skill she would take some load off of the elbow and just hold
onto the fingers. Whenever she needed more support her elbow only had a
short distance to get back to its power position.

Eventually we could get our bodies quite a distance apart and the whole time
it was with just one grip.

I walked for hours with her like this and enjoyed every minute of it!

Doug

To build up arm strength, build a seated hand-driven unicycle and ride that for a while. :slight_smile: Peter’s suggestion sounds good though. I do this when I’m teaching people to ride a unicycle. Another thing is, if you’re teaching relatively light people to ride you can sometimes get away with holding their shoulders or waist from behind. This way they can use two free arms for balance.

Andrew

Carol,

I’ve found that allowing the new rider to either put their hand on my shoulder or the top of my head, depending on how tall they are, saves my arm strength (or lack thereof). I’ll instruct the rider to lessen their hand pressure on me as soon as they can and then remove their hand for short periods of time as they progress.

Bruce

Sometimes it helps me to make my arm “squirrely”. That is, to keep it flexible and not rigidly supportive. This is better for my arm and helps the unicyclist learner to be less dependent on the support.