Boofing

Neil Dunlop <n.dunlop@kildrummy.co.uk> wrote:
> Hi Kris,
>
> In an email the other day you used the word “boofing” in relation to a
> move that Dan likes doing. A search on the net came up with dogs that go
> “boof boof” and to boof someone is to push them across a corridor while
> yelling “boof!”. None of these seem particularly applicable to
> unicycling though…
>
> It’s a great word that I’d like to add to my vocabulary. So I was
> wondering if you’d give me a brief explanation of what it entails.

I was using the term to describe moves where you air onto something but
don’t intend to actually land and ride on it, or pedal grab it. Rather,
you just impact it for a brief moment, then land back down on the street
and keep riding. Definately a move that falls in the realm of street
freestyle rather than trials.

-Kris.


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danger_uni@yahoo.com (Kris Holm) wrote in message
news:<20010726154010.57255.qmail@web11602.mail.yahoo.com>…
> Neil Dunlop <n.dunlop@kildrummy.co.uk> wrote:
> > Hi Kris,
> >
> > In an email the other day you used the word “boofing” in relation to a
> > move that Dan likes doing. A search on the net came up with dogs that
> > go “boof boof” and to boof someone is to push them across a corridor
> > while yelling “boof!”. None of these seem particularly applicable to
> > unicycling though…
> >
> > It’s a great word that I’d like to add to my vocabulary. So I was
> > wondering if you’d give me a brief explanation of what it entails.
>
> I was using the term to describe moves where you air onto something but
> don’t intend to actually land and ride on it, or pedal grab it. Rather,
> you just impact it for a brief moment, then land back down on the street
> and keep riding. Definately a move that falls in the realm of street
> freestyle rather than trials.
>
> -Kris.

I think this term is used in a number of different activities and tends to
have a similar meaning to Kris’s definition. I know it is used in kayaking
(at least I hear it over here in the UK) and is usually used in the kind
of situation where someone has hit something unintentionally, usually a
rock. Perhaps thw word originally comes from the sound you make when you
have the wind knocked out of you?

Have fun!

Graeme

Kayaking and Unicycling are my two true passions. Yes, Boofing is indeed
also a kayaking term when you run off the highside of a rock and
freefall to the water behind it landing with a ‘boof’ ! As in
unicycling, you only stay on the rock just long enough to use it as a
‘launching pad’. Peace Out-

You can’t depend on your judgement when your imagination is out of focus.
(Mark Twain)

PS - Kris, Just checked out the video. Very cool. Gives me some new tricks
to work towards-

Graeme Dods <dodsgr@my-deja.com> wrote in message
news:59655c11.0107270459.5bdcfd09@posting.google.com
> danger_uni@yahoo.com (Kris Holm) wrote in message
news:<20010726154010.57255.qmail@web11602.mail.yahoo.com>…
> > Neil Dunlop <n.dunlop@kildrummy.co.uk> wrote:
> > > Hi Kris,
> > >
> > > In an email the other day you used the word “boofing” in relation
> > > to a
move
> > > that Dan likes doing. A search on the net came up with dogs that go
"boof
> > > boof" and to boof someone is to push them across a corridor while
yelling
> > > “boof!”. None of these seem particularly applicable to unicycling
though…
> > >
> > > It’s a great word that I’d like to add to my vocabulary. So I was
wondering
> > > if you’d give me a brief explanation of what it entails.
> >
> > I was using the term to describe moves where you air onto
> > something but
don’t intend to actually
> > land and ride on it, or pedal grab it. Rather, you just impact
> > it for a
brief moment, then land
> > back down on the street and keep riding. Definately a move that falls
in the realm of street
> > freestyle rather than trials.
> >
> > -Kris.
>
> I think this term is used in a number of different activities and tends
> to have a similar meaning to Kris’s definition. I know it is used in
> kayaking (at least I hear it over here in the UK) and is usually used in
> the kind of situation where someone has hit something unintentionally,
> usually a rock. Perhaps thw word originally comes from the sound you
> make when you have the wind knocked out of you?
>
> Have fun!
>
> Graeme

Kayaking and Unicycling are my two true passions. Yes, Boofing is indeed
also a kayaking term when you run off the highside of a rock and
freefall to the water behind it landing with a ‘boof’ ! As in
unicycling, you only stay on the rock just long enough to use it as a
‘launching pad’. Peace Out-

You can’t depend on your judgement when your imagination is out of focus.
(Mark Twain)

PS - Kris, Just checked out the video. Very cool. Gives me some new tricks
to work towards-

Graeme Dods <dodsgr@my-deja.com> wrote in message
news:59655c11.0107270459.5bdcfd09@posting.google.com
> danger_uni@yahoo.com (Kris Holm) wrote in message
news:<20010726154010.57255.qmail@web11602.mail.yahoo.com>…
> > Neil Dunlop <n.dunlop@kildrummy.co.uk> wrote:
> > > Hi Kris,
> > >
> > > In an email the other day you used the word “boofing” in relation
> > > to a
move
> > > that Dan likes doing. A search on the net came up with dogs that go
"boof
> > > boof" and to boof someone is to push them across a corridor while
yelling
> > > “boof!”. None of these seem particularly applicable to unicycling
though…
> > >
> > > It’s a great word that I’d like to add to my vocabulary. So I was
wondering
> > > if you’d give me a brief explanation of what it entails.
> >
> > I was using the term to describe moves where you air onto
> > something but
don’t intend to actually
> > land and ride on it, or pedal grab it. Rather, you just impact
> > it for a
brief moment, then land
> > back down on the street and keep riding. Definately a move that falls
in the realm of street
> > freestyle rather than trials.
> >
> > -Kris.
>
> I think this term is used in a number of different activities and tends
> to have a similar meaning to Kris’s definition. I know it is used in
> kayaking (at least I hear it over here in the UK) and is usually used in
> the kind of situation where someone has hit something unintentionally,
> usually a rock. Perhaps thw word originally comes from the sound you
> make when you have the wind knocked out of you?
>
> Have fun!
>
> Graeme