Bonza Onza

RE: Bonza Onza

> What relevance does what is available in TAIWAN have?

An interesting question. It has a lot of relevance if you’re spec’ing a
unicycle out of Taiwanese parts (which I presume can give you a boxed,
ready-to-ship unicycle for you to resell). But that’s the seller’s point of
view.

The vast majority of the world’s unicycles and unicycle parts seem to be
made in Taiwan. So I wonder. Who rides them there? Surely there are
unicyclists in Taiwan, but we know nothing of any organized riders. Methinks
most of the manufacturers making and developing the high-volume, low-cost
parts are doing it in a vacuum (without any hands-on unicycling knowledge),
except for specific requests by unicyclists like Roger or John Drummond or
or Semcycle (people who make large orders).

> Japan’s a stone’s throw away…

But it’s worlds away in terms of price. Apparently the new Miyata seats are
being made in China…

Stay on top,
John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone
jfoss@unicycling.com
www.unicycling.com <http://www.unicycling.com>

“This unicycle is made all from lightweight materials. But it uses a lot of
them.” – Cliff Cordy, describing the very heavy new prototype unicycle he
brought on the Downieville Downhill

Re: Bonza Onza

> Scott Kurland wrote:
> > .6 replacement screws (significantly thicker than the
> > laughable originals), one tube of superglue, and two glue gun sticks
> > so far.
> > I may have to resort to duct tape.
> May I suggest 4 small nut/bolts, simple, sorted.

Um, no, unless you can tell me where the nuts go. (On top of the seat
<rimshot>. Never mind.)

ONZA!!!

from the look of the web site it appears that it is in stock and ready to sell.is this true?can it be bought now or is it still a prototype?

Re: Bonza Onza

John Foss wrote…
>> What relevance does what is available in TAIWAN have?
>
>An interesting question. It has a lot of relevance if you’re spec’ing a
>unicycle out of Taiwanese parts (which I presume can give you a boxed,
>ready-to-ship unicycle for you to resell). But that’s the seller’s point of
>view.
>
>The vast majority of the world’s unicycles and unicycle parts seem to be
>made in Taiwan. So I wonder. Who rides them there? Surely there are
>unicyclists in Taiwan, but we know nothing of any organized riders. Methinks

As the “Executive Director for International Development” it is my job to know
though I know little. I do know one Taiwanese whom I taght how to ride when
I was there a few years back. Once in a while I do ask but I don’t know of organized
unicycling there.

But things may have changed. As it happens, at the end of August I am giving a
workshop at COLING 2002 (the world’s most important conference on computational
linguistics) in Taipei and will spend about one week in Taiwan. I will do my best to
locate unicyclists and help them organize.

>most of the manufacturers making and developing the high-volume, low-cost
>parts are doing it in a vacuum (without any hands-on unicycling knowledge),
>except for specific requests by unicyclists like Roger or John Drummond or
>or Semcycle (people who make large orders).
>
>> Japan’s a stone’s throw away…
>
>But it’s worlds away in terms of price. Apparently the new Miyata seats are
>being made in China…
>
>Stay on top,
>John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone
>jfoss@unicycling.com
>www.unicycling.com <http://www.unicycling.com>
>
>
>
>“This unicycle is made all from lightweight materials. But it uses a lot of
>them.” – Cliff Cordy, describing the very heavy new prototype unicycle he
>brought on the Downieville Downhill
>
>___________________________________________________________________________
>rec.sport.unicycling mailing list - www.unicycling.org/mailman/listinfo/rsu
>

Stay on top, Jack Halpern

Executive Director for International Development

International Unicycling Federation, Inc.

Website: http://www.kanji.org

Scott Kurland wrote:

Of course I can tell you where the nuts go, on the end of the bolts :slight_smile:

I posted a pic on this thread

http://www.unicyclist.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=18000

Not too clear but I’m sure you can work it out (you may need to remove a small amount of excess foam on some saddles).

Gary