blame it on the bloggers

CBS says it’s the bloggers fault that Bush won:

http://www.marketwatch.com/news/print_story.asp?print=1&guid={C2B2EB99-2DB8-49ED-99FD-F94D01701BAA}&siteid=yhoo

Bloggers blew it
Commentary: Much posting, little impact

By Frank Barnako, CBS.MarketWatch.com
Last Update: 12:37 PM ET Nov. 3, 2004

WASHINGTON (CBS.MW) – No one reads blogs.

Oops! I did it again. Better get under my desk before the e-mail
flames arrive.

But when the most popular political blog draws less than 270,000
visitors on Election Day, you’ve got to ask, “What’s the point?” (More
traffic reports below.)

“How dare you say such a thing?” “What about the 4 million blogs
Technorati is tracking?” “What about the fact that 11 months ago RSS was a
geek secret and now it’s a bolt-on to My Yahoo?” “What about the 100 million
page impressions a month Blogads.com says it delivers?”

All that may be true. It’s just that after the presidential election,
it appears to me that the only readers of blogs … are bloggers! They are a
good group. Educated and engaged. But they’re also like mice in a rotating
cage: running in place, bumping into the same old people.

Despite all the anti-Bush screeds on Web logs, the frequent priming of
wordy bonfires with Bush’s National Guard duty records, the rush to judgment
about missing explosives in Iraq … it just didn’t matter. All those
opinions. All that Internet buzz. So little impact. Could it be not even
bloggers trust what they read on blogs?

Blogs were quick to publish real or made-up exit polls at
midafternoon, showing Kerry strength. That killed a 60-point rally in the
Dow Jones Industrial Average.

At least some traders read blogs, then, and act on what they read. Not
so, it would appear, young voters. Advertisers including Nike (NKE: news,
chart, profile) and Audi think Weblogs are the medium to reach young
consumers. So where was the youth and minority vote? Not reading political
blogs, it appears. MSNBC says the percentage of young voters who cast
ballots was the same as it was four years ago.

Don Imus says his favorite moment came about 2 a.m., when NBC’s
Campbell Brown was interviewing P. Diddy about his “Vote or Die” campaign.
Seems to me it’s dead. Where were the 18-29s? At Meetups? The Associated
Press says exit polls found blacks made up roughly the same proportion of
voters as in 2000.

GOP Chairman Ed Gillespie’s incredibly optimistic spin on CNN early in
the evening was an effective, “old media”-style get-out-the-vote entreaty.
While his mouth told how confident he was, his eyes transmitted a subliminal
message: “The bloggers said the early exit polls were horrible. We need to
pile on. Go vote! It’s not too late.”

Bottom line: Political blogging is like Ralph Nader. Nobody pays
attention.

Exclusive: Political site traffic soars

The biggest Election Day winner was DrudgeReport.com. The number of
Tuesday visitors to the site was nearly 1 million, according to an analysis
by comScore Networks. That’s 60 percent more than Drudge’s usual daily
traffic. The Kerry and Bush campaign sites each saw daily traffic double,
while FoxNews.com hosted 1.8 million visitors, about 75 percent more than on
a usual day. Comparablly, CNN.com had 63 percent more visitors, while
WashingtonPost.com was up 98 percent.

Understandably, the number of visits to some of the biggest political
Weblogs was high. DailyKos.com’s traffic was nearly triple normal at 260,000
visitors, while Instapundit was up by 140 percent.

Re: blame it on the bloggers

Huh? Does CNN envy bloggers now? What a bunch of BS…

“Rodney Blackwell” <rodney@webdiscuss.com> wrote in message
news:cmb7hs$13k$1@server1.darklock.com
> CBS says it’s the bloggers fault that Bush won:
>
>
>
http://www.marketwatch.com/news/print_story.asp?print=1&guid={C2B2EB99-2DB8-49ED-99FD-F94D01701BAA}&siteid=yhoo
>
> Bloggers blew it
> Commentary: Much posting, little impact
>
> By Frank Barnako, CBS.MarketWatch.com
> Last Update: 12:37 PM ET Nov. 3, 2004
>
>
> WASHINGTON (CBS.MW) – No one reads blogs.
>
>
>
> Oops! I did it again. Better get under my desk before the e-mail
> flames arrive.
>
> But when the most popular political blog draws less than 270,000
> visitors on Election Day, you’ve got to ask, “What’s the point?” (More
> traffic reports below.)
>
> “How dare you say such a thing?” “What about the 4 million blogs
> Technorati is tracking?” “What about the fact that 11 months ago RSS was a
> geek secret and now it’s a bolt-on to My Yahoo?” “What about the 100
million
> page impressions a month Blogads.com says it delivers?”
>
> All that may be true. It’s just that after the presidential
election,
> it appears to me that the only readers of blogs … are bloggers! They are
a
> good group. Educated and engaged. But they’re also like mice in a rotating
> cage: running in place, bumping into the same old people.
>
> Despite all the anti-Bush screeds on Web logs, the frequent priming
of
> wordy bonfires with Bush’s National Guard duty records, the rush to
judgment
> about missing explosives in Iraq … it just didn’t matter. All those
> opinions. All that Internet buzz. So little impact. Could it be not even
> bloggers trust what they read on blogs?
>
> Blogs were quick to publish real or made-up exit polls at
> midafternoon, showing Kerry strength. That killed a 60-point rally in the
> Dow Jones Industrial Average.
>
> At least some traders read blogs, then, and act on what they read.
Not
> so, it would appear, young voters. Advertisers including Nike (NKE: news,
> chart, profile) and Audi think Weblogs are the medium to reach young
> consumers. So where was the youth and minority vote? Not reading political
> blogs, it appears. MSNBC says the percentage of young voters who cast
> ballots was the same as it was four years ago.
>
> Don Imus says his favorite moment came about 2 a.m., when NBC’s
> Campbell Brown was interviewing P. Diddy about his “Vote or Die” campaign.
> Seems to me it’s dead. Where were the 18-29s? At Meetups? The Associated
> Press says exit polls found blacks made up roughly the same proportion of
> voters as in 2000.
>
> GOP Chairman Ed Gillespie’s incredibly optimistic spin on CNN early
in
> the evening was an effective, “old media”-style get-out-the-vote entreaty.
> While his mouth told how confident he was, his eyes transmitted a
subliminal
> message: “The bloggers said the early exit polls were horrible. We need to
> pile on. Go vote! It’s not too late.”
>
> Bottom line: Political blogging is like Ralph Nader. Nobody pays
> attention.
>
> Exclusive: Political site traffic soars
>
> The biggest Election Day winner was DrudgeReport.com. The number of
> Tuesday visitors to the site was nearly 1 million, according to an
analysis
> by comScore Networks. That’s 60 percent more than Drudge’s usual daily
> traffic. The Kerry and Bush campaign sites each saw daily traffic double,
> while FoxNews.com hosted 1.8 million visitors, about 75 percent more than
on
> a usual day. Comparablly, CNN.com had 63 percent more visitors, while
> WashingtonPost.com was up 98 percent.
>
> Understandably, the number of visits to some of the biggest
political
> Weblogs was high. DailyKos.com’s traffic was nearly triple normal at
260,000
> visitors, while Instapundit was up by 140 percent.
>
>
>

Re: blame it on the bloggers

Should be CBS not CNN
“Eugene” <webmaster@animationlibrary.com> wrote in message
news:cmb8vh$214$1@server1.darklock.com
> Huh? Does CNN envy bloggers now? What a bunch of BS…
>
>
> “Rodney Blackwell” <rodney@webdiscuss.com> wrote in message
> news:cmb7hs$13k$1@server1.darklock.com
> > CBS says it’s the bloggers fault that Bush won:
> >
> >
> >
>
http://www.marketwatch.com/news/print_story.asp?print=1&guid={C2B2EB99-2DB8-49ED-99FD-F94D01701BAA}&siteid=yhoo
> >
> > Bloggers blew it
> > Commentary: Much posting, little impact
> >
> > By Frank Barnako, CBS.MarketWatch.com
> > Last Update: 12:37 PM ET Nov. 3, 2004
> >
> >
> > WASHINGTON (CBS.MW) – No one reads blogs.
> >
> >
> >
> > Oops! I did it again. Better get under my desk before the e-mail
> > flames arrive.
> >
> > But when the most popular political blog draws less than 270,000
> > visitors on Election Day, you’ve got to ask, “What’s the point?” (More
> > traffic reports below.)
> >
> > “How dare you say such a thing?” “What about the 4 million blogs
> > Technorati is tracking?” “What about the fact that 11 months ago RSS was
a
> > geek secret and now it’s a bolt-on to My Yahoo?” “What about the 100
> million
> > page impressions a month Blogads.com says it delivers?”
> >
> > All that may be true. It’s just that after the presidential
> election,
> > it appears to me that the only readers of blogs … are bloggers! They
are
> a
> > good group. Educated and engaged. But they’re also like mice in a
rotating
> > cage: running in place, bumping into the same old people.
> >
> > Despite all the anti-Bush screeds on Web logs, the frequent
priming
> of
> > wordy bonfires with Bush’s National Guard duty records, the rush to
> judgment
> > about missing explosives in Iraq … it just didn’t matter. All those
> > opinions. All that Internet buzz. So little impact. Could it be not even
> > bloggers trust what they read on blogs?
> >
> > Blogs were quick to publish real or made-up exit polls at
> > midafternoon, showing Kerry strength. That killed a 60-point rally in
the
> > Dow Jones Industrial Average.
> >
> > At least some traders read blogs, then, and act on what they read.
> Not
> > so, it would appear, young voters. Advertisers including Nike (NKE:
news,
> > chart, profile) and Audi think Weblogs are the medium to reach young
> > consumers. So where was the youth and minority vote? Not reading
political
> > blogs, it appears. MSNBC says the percentage of young voters who cast
> > ballots was the same as it was four years ago.
> >
> > Don Imus says his favorite moment came about 2 a.m., when NBC’s
> > Campbell Brown was interviewing P. Diddy about his “Vote or Die”
campaign.
> > Seems to me it’s dead. Where were the 18-29s? At Meetups? The Associated
> > Press says exit polls found blacks made up roughly the same proportion
of
> > voters as in 2000.
> >
> > GOP Chairman Ed Gillespie’s incredibly optimistic spin on CNN
early
> in
> > the evening was an effective, “old media”-style get-out-the-vote
entreaty.
> > While his mouth told how confident he was, his eyes transmitted a
> subliminal
> > message: “The bloggers said the early exit polls were horrible. We need
to
> > pile on. Go vote! It’s not too late.”
> >
> > Bottom line: Political blogging is like Ralph Nader. Nobody pays
> > attention.
> >
> > Exclusive: Political site traffic soars
> >
> > The biggest Election Day winner was DrudgeReport.com. The number
of
> > Tuesday visitors to the site was nearly 1 million, according to an
> analysis
> > by comScore Networks. That’s 60 percent more than Drudge’s usual daily
> > traffic. The Kerry and Bush campaign sites each saw daily traffic
double,
> > while FoxNews.com hosted 1.8 million visitors, about 75 percent more
than
> on
> > a usual day. Comparablly, CNN.com had 63 percent more visitors, while
> > WashingtonPost.com was up 98 percent.
> >
> > Understandably, the number of visits to some of the biggest
> political
> > Weblogs was high. DailyKos.com’s traffic was nearly triple normal at
> 260,000
> > visitors, while Instapundit was up by 140 percent.
> >
> >
> >
>
>

Re: blame it on the bloggers

“Eugene” <webmaster@animationlibrary.com> wrote in message
news:cmb907$21i$1@server1.darklock.com
> Should be CBS not CNN
> “Eugene” <webmaster@animationlibrary.com> wrote in message
> news:cmb8vh$214$1@server1.darklock.com
>> Huh? Does CNN envy bloggers now? What a bunch of BS…

To me it sounded as if they were saying “even after all the strong backlash
against bush that appeared in blogs in the past months/years, and all the
‘get bush out’ rhetoric, it seems to have been all for naught”.

I found it an interesting point. Some thought blogs/the internet would be a
deciding factor in this election, when it doesn’t appear to be the case.


Rodney

Re: blame it on the bloggers

Rodney Blackwell wrote:
> CBS says it’s the bloggers fault that Bush won:

Wait, a major media corporation denouncing a grass-roots media campaign?
Who’d have thought?

Of course CBS will say they had little or no impact, and that the
bloggers wasted their effort on their blogs instead of other media outlets.

But those bloggers would not have been heard by ANYONE had they not been
blogging. The major media corporations are either to coward to speak the
truth, or too biased to deliver it. Period.

They blame the bloggers. I blame them. It’s been their fault for years.
Stop broadcasting rhetoric and start broadcasting facts. I don’t want to
hear an anchorman give me his opinion. I want him to read to me what
happened and who said what. I don’t care what his opinion is. I want to
think for myself, and make my own decisions.

(which is why I don’t watch anything other than local news)

-Mike K.

Re: blame it on the bloggers

The internet was key in organizing the people that did vote. Given that I
don’t see how bad exit polls changed the voting. I don’t think many were
sitting at home say oh is 51-29 KErry I can sit on my ass.
I agree it sounds like a major network poo pooing and trying to make a big
deal out fo nothing. Would dems ahve been so active it wasn’t for Dean,
Meetup, ACT, and the other groups that grew a lot out fo the internet?

Brian

“Rodney Blackwell” <rodney@webdiscuss.com> wrote in message
news:cmb9nf$3j7$1@server1.darklock.com
> “Eugene” <webmaster@animationlibrary.com> wrote in message
> news:cmb907$21i$1@server1.darklock.com
>> Should be CBS not CNN
>> “Eugene” <webmaster@animationlibrary.com> wrote in message
>> news:cmb8vh$214$1@server1.darklock.com…[color=darkred]
>>> Huh? Does CNN envy bloggers now? What a bunch of BS…
>
>
> To me it sounded as if they were saying “even after all the strong
> backlash against bush that appeared in blogs in the past months/years, and
> all the ‘get bush out’ rhetoric, it seems to have been all for naught”.
>
> I found it an interesting point. Some thought blogs/the internet would be
> a deciding factor in this election, when it doesn’t appear to be the case.
>
> –
> Rodney
>[/color]