Best frame to saw down

My wife is short. Really short. So far we’ve taken a KH24 and:

Cut the seat post such that the seat is as low as it can possibly go.
Ditched the KH adjustable seat post in favor of a non-adjustable to gain that extra half inch.
Went with a KH Street because it is a little thinner.
Moved to 127mm cranks… for muni.

Still she has full leg extension at the bottom of her rotation. Yes, she could probably go on disability for being so short. :wink: This leaves no room for bending knees when riding over small obstacles.

Next step. Sawing a frame. I need a little help with determining which would be the best frame to saw down for 24" (or possibly 26") muni.

Considerations:

  1. The frame with the least amount of tire to frame fork clearance. This much is obvious. No sense in giving up lots and lots of space between the top of the tire and the frame.
  2. I could be wrong but it looks like the nimbus frames could be cut down a bit more than the KH frames because the seat post can pass through the frame fork as opposed to resting on top of the fork like with the KH.
  3. I’m leaning toward the oracle frame since it has a rounded crown and that would likely be a factor once you start talking lowering the seat practically down to the top of the tire.
  4. How far down could the frame of your choice be safely cut?

Thoughts?

P.S. I can’t convince her to just do muni on a trials. :angry: :stuck_out_tongue:

Well, looks like the oracle frame really is quit what you are looking for.

The seattube is open at both ends, so you can let the seatpost be longer than the seattube (but why?).
The seattube goes all the way down to the bottom of the crown so maximum seatpost in seattube (good) and it has the same outer diameter all the way down (unlike kh) so you can cut it down as far as you want (well, there should be enough lenght left for at least a single-bolt seatclamp).

Which seat are you planning to use?

How much inseam length does she actually have?

Greetings

Byc

Seat: KH Street
Inseam: about 25"

How about wooden blocks on the pedals?

I guess a picture says 1000 words and this may sound like I’ve already made up my mind (probably have) but:

Let’s say I have to have a minimum of 3" of seat post tube for the frame. The cut line (red) can be closer to the cranks with the nimbus frame because the measurement starts from the bottom of the crown. It starts at the top of the crown with the KH.

That much is fairly obvious.

The main question is what of the tire clearance between the two (hypothetical lines drawn in green)? E.g. what good would an oracle frame do if the tire clearance on the top added an extra half inch when compared to the KH?

Maybe we need one of those telescoping frames designed for shorter 36 riders just to get her up on a 24.

frames.jpg

Maybe someone with a 24 inch Oracle can measure their frame from the bottom of the crown to bottom of the frame and you can compare that measurement to your KH 24.

Personally, I would reject the KH frame for post cutting, because of the flare. For your purposes, I think a single-diameter post would be the one to use.

The answer is so simple…Ultimate Wheel!

Seriously though, I think the Oracle is your best bet. You might even be able to get her on a 26" that way. Call UDC and see if they would get the measurements for you.

She did really well on the 127’s this weekend. If you can get her on some 150’s, she would be unstoppable!

I thought about the Nightfox too! Alas, despite the claim that it “was designed to allow almost anybody at any height the ability to ride a 36” unicycle," the minimum inseam listed for it is 27". If the legs could retract an extra 2" below that minimum, so 4" less wheel diameter, she could still easily get on a 29er. You’d need a wheel with a 127 mm wide hub but that can be done.

Oracles seemed very popular at Douthat, but the inseam specs on the web look a little bit suspect. Why would the US and UK websites give different numbers for the same model, and why would the minimum with a shortened seatpost but uncut frame be the same for 24", 26", and 29" models? Calling UDC sounds good. You’re paying for that service anyway if you buy from them.

Yes, she did great and she’s a sweetheart too. Get her something nice. :slight_smile:

Steel. If you go with a steel frame you’ll find it a lot easier to either reweld, or have someone else reweld, even repeatedly. Aluminum doesn’t like rewelding nearly as much.

Nimbus 2 frames are good and reasonably priced too.

Sam

To be honest, it would be easier to get a taller wife…:wink:

Frame cutting seems like the more economical option.

Thanks for the replies. We’ll figure something out.

If she’s OK with 127s, 150s are about an inch longer. You need 1 inch chopped and then a bit more to get the knee bend. Another inch?

With whatever frame you go with, you should have at least 2" of seatpost inside the frame.

We’ve cut both KH and Oracle frames to fit vertically challenged riders. The KH 36" didn’t have a lot of room to cut, but we got at least 1 1/2" before we were down to the external butt. A nice single bolt clamp (I like the Sala Lip Locks) could have gained us a bit more, but we were OK without switching it.

We’ve cut at least 2 Oracles- one of them quite low- we didn’t leave a whole lot of material for much more than the clamp and then the crown. I’m pretty sure the rider of those has an inseam of 26-27in max. He has a 26 and 36. The 36 we had to go with a KH Street seat as well. He was debating whether or not to wait for the Nightfox, but when we figured out he’d be OK without he couldn’t wait.

If you only need 1 1/2" to 2" you should be fine with either frame. Be sure to drill the bottom of the slot (that you just cut) after you cut the frame.

Hmm, I’ve always drilled the hole first and then made the slot to the hole. It probably works either way, but for some reason I thought it would be easier this way.

Just cut the seat tube. You need to leave about 2" of tube to be safe. I had both of my 4yr old on a 24". I left approx. 2" of tube.

Pedal blocks are not comfortable and a poor choice.