beginner's question: turning

I have been riding for about three weeks. For those who remember my earlier
post, I have solved the ‘20-foot barrier’. I can go straight forward
indefinitely (at least until the end of my street), and I can free mount. It
seems that natural progression dictates that I should learn to turn next, so
that I don’t have to jump off at the end of the street and re-mount in the other
direction.

So far, attempts at turning have resulted in a couple of nasty spills and quite
a few more jumps off the uni as I feel myself losing balance. I would appreciate
any suggestions.

Dan Fingerman !daniel.fingerman@yale.edu Spam protection: remove the !

Re: beginner’s question: turning

In the (for what it may be worth department) I remember when I was first
learning to ride that I had to keep telling myself to (keep pedaling!). I guess
that I was so used to coasting, like one would do on a bicycle, that it became a
habit. I found that when I would encounter a small obsticle, (or need to turn) I
would momentarily stop pedaling. This was not working - and you can predict the
results! Once my body and brain understood the need to power through everything
while on the uni, I initailly found that I could turn by a slight
twisting/pedaling action. As I continued to ride though, I found that I could
(slightly) lean into the turn and still stay on top of the uni heading in the
desired direction. It was kind of a tough learning process for me, but I think
that the best advice to give would be to (Keep Pedaling!!!). Hope that this
helps, Mike

Re: beginner’s question: turning

Greetings

In message “beginner’s question: turning”, Dan Fingerman wrote…
>I have been riding for about three weeks. For those who remember my earlier
>post, I have solved the ‘20-foot barrier’. I can go straight forward
>indefinitely (at least until the end of my street), and I can free mount. It
>seems that natural progression dictates that I should learn to turn next, so
>that I don’t have to jump off at the end of the street and re-mount in the
>other direction.
>
>So far, attempts at turning have resulted in a couple of nasty spills and
>quite a few more jumps off the uni as I feel myself losing balance. I would
>appreciate any suggestions.
>

Just some short advice. Keep all or almost your weight on the ssaddle, and lean
a little into the turn. (My book Anyone Can Ride A Unicycle has more) .

>Dan Fingerman !daniel.fingerman@yale.edu Spam protection: remove the !
>

Stay on top, Jack Halpern, IUF Vice President Website: http://www.kanji.org

Re: beginner’s question: turning

Dan Fingerman wrote:

> I have been riding for about three weeks. For those who remember my earlier
> post, I have solved the ‘20-foot barrier’. I can go straight forward
> indefinitely (at least until the end of my street), and I can free mount. It
> seems that natural progression dictates that I should learn to turn next, so
> that I don’t have to jump off at the end of the street and re-mount in the
> other direction.
>
> So far, attempts at turning have resulted in a couple of nasty spills and
> quite a few more jumps off the uni as I feel myself losing balance. I would
> appreciate any suggestions.

When I first started, turning was a big barrier to me until someone pointed out
the obvious. I knew you had to lean with your hips in the direction of the turn
if you wanted to make a gradual turn (as opposed to a sharp turn which works
slightly differently). I didn’t realise that your upper body has to lean in the
opposite direction so you can keep your balance! Once I had this piece of
information things were a lot easier.

It makes sense if you think about it as your centre of gravity should remain
over the point of contact of the tire with the ground.

Catch ya Peter

Re: beginner’s question: turning

At 07:06 PM 6/20/98 GMT, you wrote:
>I have been riding for about three weeks. For those who remember my earlier
>post, I have solved the ‘20-foot barrier’. I can go straight forward
>indefinitely (at least until the end of my street), and I can free mount. It
>seems that natural progression dictates that I should learn to turn next, so
>that I don’t have to jump off at the end of the street and re-mount in the
>other direction.
>
>So far, attempts at turning have resulted in a couple of nasty spills and quite
>a few more jumps off the uni as I feel myself losing balance. I would
>appreciate any suggestions.
>
>
>Dan Fingerman !daniel.fingerman@yale.edu Spam protection: remove the !
>
>

I suggest you start with wide turns. Look toward the direction you want to
turn. Your upper body will gradually follow your head and then the wheel will
turn to follow.

As you get the feel of it, gradually make your turns sharper.

Jock Young

This message produced with 100% post consumer recycled electrons.

Re: beginner’s question: turning

daniel.fingerman@yale.edu (Dan Fingerman) writes:

> So far, attempts at turning have resulted in a couple of nasty spills and
> quite a few more jumps off the uni as I feel myself losing balance. I would
> appreciate any suggestions.

Turn your head, and look where you want to go.

Let your mind go, and your body will follow. (eventually, after much practice)

Re: beginner’s question: turning

Greetings

In message “Re: beginner’s question: turning”, Mike Payne wrote…

Here is a quote form my book Anyone Can Ride A Unicycle about turning. I hope
this helps.

3 - 1 TURNING

The unicycle can be turned by leaning slightly in the direction of the turn, or
by twisting your body in the opposite direction. Large turns are best done by
leaning; tight turns, by combining leaning with twisting.

Start with 90 turns then go on to 180 turns. Most people have a preferred
direction for turning, but it is desirable to learn to turn in both directions.
As soon as you can turn in one direction, practice turning in the other
direction. Practice till you can turn at both slow and fast speeds.

Next, try tighter turns. Apply twist in opposite direction of turn as well as
lean into the turn. Keep your weight on the saddle and pedal smoothly. Ride
straight then turn in either direction.

Early turns are rough and jerky. Keep practising till the pedalling action is
smooth, till you feel that you, not the unicycle, is in control. The unicycle
should become part of you, obeying your every command.

Regards, Jack Halpern Kanji Dictionary Publishing Society, http://www.kanji.org
Voice: +81-048-481-3103 Fax: +81-048-479-1323