Beginner questions...

First of all, hello to everyone since I’m new here. I’m seriously considering investing in a unicycle, however there are a few questions I had first.

I was thinking of purchasing from Dube juggling. Are these decent unicycles for a beginner?

Would you suggest a 20" or 24" for a beginner?

Also, I’m slightly worried that my size will possibly hinder my learning. I’m 6’2" and quite husky…wondering if it will make it much more difficult to learn. I guess that “bigger they are, harder they fall” thing keeps running thru my head L

Thanks in advance for any advice you can offer :slight_smile:

This has been addressed numerous times. Click this to look at posts dealing with your question.
http://www.unicyclist.com/forums/newreply.php?s=&action=newreply&threadid=15066

The best place to get a uni is Unicycle.com they will also help you figure out what type of set up you need. You talked about getting a uni from DUBE, and I love their juggling products, but their unis are torkers, an ok starter uni, but i would not recomend it. since you mentioned DUBE, do you live in N.Y.? I am part of a uni club that meets the first sunday, and third saturday of every month at the Bandshell in Central park. E-mail me for more info on the club if you are interested. There are also a lot of who juggle there.
-David Kaplan (JFatSmokes@aol.com)

“Spin” <forum.member@unicyclist.com> wrote in message
news:9tja2j$c95$1@laurel.tc.umn.edu
> Would you suggest a 20" or 24" for a beginner?

Either is good. A 20" is more common for tricks, hockey, basketball and
other indoor activities. A 24" can be used for all these, but also lends
itself more to muni and other outdoor activities. My first uni was a DM
24". Now that I have both 20" and 26" unis, I hardly ever use it.

> Also, I’m slightly worried that my size will possibly hinder my
> learning. I’m 6’2" and quite husky…wondering if it will make it much
> more difficult to learn. I guess that "bigger they are, harder they
> fall" thing keeps running thru my head L

Husky?! I like the sound of that. As one of the heavier members of the
unicycling community, I used to worry about this. Don’t. Just enjoy
yourself. I did purchase a little reassurance by getting 48 spoke wheels,
but I reckon that after I make my first serious drop the uni will be just
as knackered :-).

Arnold the Aardvark

Spin wrote:
>
> First of all, hello to everyone since I’m new here. I’m seriously
> considering investing in a unicycle, however there are a few questions I
> had first.
>
> I was thinking of purchasing from Dube juggling. Are these decent
> unicycles for a beginner?
>
> Would you suggest a 20" or 24" for a beginner?
>
> Also, I’m slightly worried that my size will possibly hinder my
> learning. I’m 6’2" and quite husky…wondering if it will make it much
> more difficult to learn. I guess that "bigger they are, harder they
> fall" thing keeps running thru my head L
>
> Thanks in advance for any advice you can offer

Hi Spin;

Check out http://www.unicycle.com.

You first need to do some thinkin’ about what genre of unicycling you
intend to do. If you are already a juggler then you are talkin’ freestyle
and therefore a smaller wheel (20") is likely what you need. There are
some with gum or white latex tires that are non-mar for gymnasium floors.

If you are interested in trials, doing goofie stunts, then between a
20-24" wheel I think is the norm. For trials you need a very strong
axle/hub because hopping on a lesser axle will break it after a time and
some here have gone through more than their fair share of axles in a year.
I think trials people like fatter tires as well. This helps with hopping.
A really good seat with maybe air cushioning comes in handy as well.

MUni, or mountain unicycling, also needs a tough vehicle. Infact many MUni
people do both MUni and trials and sometimes there is only a fine line
between the two. Most MUniers like either a 24 or a 26 inch tire. It also
helps to have a very fat, very grippy tire. For long hauls on trails
longer cranks are in order; maybe 160 - 180mm. These come in handy for
barrelling up hills or slow progression down a steep hill. Very grippy
peddles are handy as well. Possibly bearclaw type with little spikey edges
to them. A STRONG axle is a necessity.

Always a comfortable seat comes in handy and Miyata is generally
considered to be the best commercial one available. These can be modified
in a number of ways as well, such as with a small inner tube folded in
half and inserted into a seat cover.

Lastly, for commuting a Coker is best. With its big 36" wheel you can
travel with traffic on the road. Smaller cranks are in order here and
many have changed the cranks that came with the Coker for shorties as
small as 140mm.

I could go on but I’m cookin’ a turkey. Certainly go online to the URL
above and check them out.

Mmmmmmm… I my stomach is grumbling.

Christopher Grove

“Be Bold and mighty forces will come to your aid.” -Basil King (Anyone who
can give me more info on THIS Basil King please email
me.)

My small but growing site: http://home.earthlink.net/~crgrove/index.htm

If you are in the Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti, MI area check out my resume and if
you know of a company that fits me please let me know… Thanks!

Hi Spin, I just started riding on Tuesday. I bought a Semcycle XLW 24
inch. I’ve heard that the 24 inch with a knobby tire is harder to ride,
but I can already free mount and ride a couple blocks just fine. I think
you can learn OK on which ever one you try. I wanted a MUNI, so thats what
I got. cheers…Joe in Iowa “Boy are my legs sore”

-----Original Message----- From: Spin <forum.member@unicyclist.com>

>First of all, hello to everyone since I’m new here. I’m seriously
>considering investing in a unicycle, however there are a few questions I
>had first
>
>Would you suggest a 20" or 24" for a beginner?