Bedford vs 'Cheap' uni comparison pic

If anyone has any thing to add to this, I’m all ears

http://londonunicyclingclub.ca/images/UniCompare.htm

Re: Bedford vs ‘Cheap’ uni comparison pic

nope, that pretty much sums it up.

-Budd-

Re: Bedford vs ‘Cheap’ uni comparison pic

“Although someone who purchases the unicycle on the left may never have problems … it will definitely limit what you can do.”

Shouldn’t that be “on the right”? The left one is the good one, yes?

-quick release seat post clamp on Bedford is welded to the frame
-36 hole hub and rim (some bike store unis have 28 hole limiting hub options)

Re: Bedford vs ‘Cheap’ uni comparison pic

On Wed, 21 May 2003 15:46:14 -0500, Sofa
<Sofa.nsqtz@timelimit.unicyclist.com> wrote:

>If anyone has any thing to add to this, I’m all ears

Well the Bedford seems to come without pedals which is definitely a
con. Seriously, the pedals on a Bedford (assuming it has them
standard) might be better than on the ‘bike store unicycle’. I like
the way you have set up this comparison!

Klaas Bil - Newsgroup Addict

Hacky-sack was invented in Turkey.

Re: Bedford vs ‘Cheap’ uni comparison pic

On Wed, 21 May 2003 15:46:14 -0500, Sofa
<Sofa.nsqtz@timelimit.unicyclist.com> wrote:

>If anyone has any thing to add to this, I’m all ears

Oh and what about the quick release on the Bedford, looks better to
me.

It occurs to me though that there are more good unicycles than just
Bedfords, maybe you should allude to that notion.

Klaas Bil - Newsgroup Addict

Hacky-sack was invented in Turkey.

ooh. the unicycle on the Right :o thanks

although there are other alternatives to the Bedford that are just as good, this is for my Ontario site. There is no where in Canada that matches the quality for price.

I left the QR off, is because I find both work the same. not good enough. I would recommend a 3 bolt clamp to anyone who buys either

But I guess I’ll put it on, as if they both make for a loose seat, I guess it’s still better to be able to adjust the height. One more for the Bedford :slight_smile:


Check it out for a review

I actually bought a 24 inch Bedford unicycle af few weeks ago, and really like it.

I have the normal Bedford pedals (ie, the non metal kind that comes with the uni) and I found that they were smaller than the ones on my bike store 20 inch, but sturdier.

The quick release is also very solid.

Oh, and a couple of additional edit points. It feels nicer to ride than the 20–a bit more resistance on the Bedford than my 20 incher. Not sure if this is just a temporary thing, but if memory serves me right, the above page mentions it too.

Darren mentioned that it can take up to a 29 inch tire when I picked it up from him. I don’t know how this would feel, but thought that it’d be worth mentioning

Re: Bedford vs ‘Cheap’ uni comparison pic

In article <Sofa.nsqtz@timelimit.unicyclist.com>,
Sofa <Sofa.nsqtz@timelimit.unicyclist.com> writes:
>
> If anyone has any thing to add to this, I’m all ears
>
> http://londonunicyclingclub.ca/images/UniCompare.htm
>

Cottered cranks are pretty hard to come by these days. My cheapo
Taiwanese uni had cotterless cranks allright.

I really like having a quick-release, though I find it difficult
to get it tight enough to keep the saddle from shifting. I can’t
decide whether it’s an advantage or disadvantage on balance.

My experience is that a lollypop-frame-crack is not the end
of the world. I put many hours on my frame after repairing
the classic frame cracks:

Here are some actual pros/cons:

The seatpost length of my Taiwanese uni was totally inadequate.
Even maxed out, it was unridable until I picked up 300mm post
(with a Miyata saddle on it). Darren’s unis come with a useful
seatpost.

The cranks on my Taiwanese uni were a bit long for road use, but
okay for off-road. Darren has a couple of crank lengths to choose
from, so you can choose something that suits better.

============================================================
Gardner Buchanan <gbuchana@rogers.com>
Ottawa, ON FreeBSD: Where you want to go. Today.

I agree with Gardner about the Lollypop frame cracks not turning the Unicycle into Garbage. My old unicycle fully cracked down either side and after being fixed it was probably the strongest part on the Unicycle. I took it to the Bike shop where I bought it and they found a spare piece of mountain bike seatpost and attempted to drill it. They had only made small dents in it when I came in to see if it was fixed. I took it off their hands and went to my friends place where he has a drill press. It was tough to get through the metal, but with the shods on the ends of the forks it was unbreakable. Pity the cotter-pin cranks did not last as well. The short seat post sucked. I think the bedford looks good but I don’t think the high tire clearance would be ideal for all types riding. One footing and gliding/coasting would probably be better with the crown nearer to the wheel. Most bike-shop unicycles in NZ do not have lollypop bearing holders any more and usually come with main cap style. Another complaint about Bike store unicycles is the non-sealed bearings. Once I fell off while trying to go too fast on a lumpy bridge in the park (made from punga logs). My unicycle bounced and bounced and bounced… and landed in the river. I had to get both the bearings replaced since the water got inside and ruined them. This should not affect most people but it is a reminder of how you tend to get better quality when you spend more money.

Brian

That is a neat comparison chart. Nice work.

The frame on the stock Bedford 24" freestyle unicycle has a 24" frame.
I can sub a 26" frame so a downhill tire to fit or a 28" so a 700 series wheel set will fit if desired.

The one in Brian’s chart has a 28" frame.

Darren

Hye Darren, that pic is one of the ones I just picked up from you, though.

Brian

Brian

3 of the 24" you got have 26" so you could get a downhill tire in them and 1 had a 28" so you could possible put a 26" downhill or a 29" wheel set.

No problem switching them if you want to.

Darren

Oh, I never noticed.

No, I will keep them like this. Personally, I don’t find any disadvantage with a taller frame…one footing is fine, and I think that would be the only problem…if it was one.

I really think the versatility in a frame that can fit many wheel sizes is in any riders best interest.

Thanks Darren