BC wheels

Who was it that posted about bending down and pushing with hands off the ground
to increase ones speed on the BC wheel? Whoever they saw doing it must have had
very long arms. I use a 20" wheel and even with someone holding it steady I
cant reach the ground without sitting on the wheel, while maintaining my
balance above the axle. Could this be because my lineage is too far removed
from the Apes?

Mark Sands E-mail M.R.Sands@iasos.utas.edu.au o IASOS/CRC Ph: +61 20 2941 Fax:
+61 20 2973 o ------------------------------------------------ o Institute of
Antarctic and Southern Ocean Studies o CRC for Antarctic and Southern Ocean
Environment o o @ —|---\o
#
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** **_

Re: BC wheels

No arms dangling to the ground; but Corey Chandler was trying to use ski poles
to provide extra push. Before you can use the poles, though, you’ve got to
have a pretty good sense of balance.

Re: BC wheels

> I use a 20" BC wheel. I’ve never tried any other sizes but I imagine that a
> 24" say would be scarier if anything, because you’d have to jump higher to get
> on and you’d be higher from the ground. Also you’d have to controll the tilt
> of the wheel much more than a smaller one to stop it rubbing on your leg. All
> this aside it may well be easier to controll a 24", I don’t know.

I learned on a 20", but now I ride a 24" as I like the fact that I have to pedal
less to go the same distance (call me lazy if you like). Anyway, as far as I can
discern, the only real difference as the wheels get bigger is that you don’t get
as much torque control. I rode a 30" once which had shortened cranks and it was
unbelievably difficult to start off, but once the momentum was up, I was doing
about 30mph!

Ed


Julian Edwards, Internet Systems Ltd. Woking, Surrey, UK. Internet:
wjedwd@isl.com (preferred) or julian.edwards@isl.com (MSMAIL, aagh)

Woking, n: The feeling you have when you walk into a kitchen and wonder what you
went in there for.

Re: BC wheels

M.R.Sands wrote

>> I use a 20" BC wheel. I’ve never tried any other sizes but I imagine that a
>> 24" say would be scarier if anything, because you’d have to jump higher to
>> get on and you’d be higher from the ground. Also you’d have to controll the
>> tilt of the wheel much more than a smaller one to stop it rubbing on your
>> leg. All this aside it may well be easier to controll a 24", I don’t know.

Ed replied
>I learned on a 20", but now I ride a 24" as I like the fact that I have to
>pedal less to go the same distance (call me lazy if you like). Anyway, as far
>as I can discern, the only real difference as the wheels get bigger is that you
>don’t get as much torque control. I rode a 30" once which had shortened cranks
>and it was unbelievably difficult to start off, but once the momentum was up, I
>was doing about 30mph!

I figure there is some misunderstanding here. A BC wheel is not the same thing
as a unicycle. Lets see if this clears it up a bit.

A BC (or impossible wheel) is just a wheel and axle. You ride it by rolling it
along then jumping onto it. (Or so I’ve heard - Ive never seen one used in
anger). You can’t pedal, but I believe you can control speed is you are crazy
enough to bend down and shunt yourself along the floor with your hands. I’ve
heard that some BC wheels use two cranks that are free to rotate w.r.t. the
wheel. Standing on these brings you closer to the ground and should improve
the balance.

Between the BC wheel and the Uni there is the untimate wheel. This is unicycle
wheel with pedals and cranks, you can just take the wheel off a normal uni and
use that but it is harder and tends to bend the cranks when things go wrong.
Ultimates can be used for idling, bunny hopping (just), etc. I havn’t tried
wheel walking or one footed though :slight_smile: DM make a 24" ultimate, the only
production one I know of. Others I have seen are usually 27". I’ve tried a 20"
uni wheel without success, and find bigger is better. I guess its what you can
do with it that counts though.

For those interested, you can make an ultimate by cutting a plywood disk to
fit inside an old rim, then bolting steel plates with old bike crank ends
welded onto them on to attach the pedals with. Keep the pedals close to the
wood (makes it easier to control the tilt) and not too far from the centre of
the wheel (otherwise you need to bounce up and down a lot when you ride).
Also, take care that however you attach the pedals to the wheel, you dont
leave too many bolt heads sticking out because they will take large gouges
out of your calf - at least at first. Narrow tyres also help, with smooth
side walls. Silicone spray helps your leg slide over the tyre and so aids
restful sleep.

Anyone else out there got suggestions for tricks on these things. I’m just
getting to be able to roll the wheel along (a really heavy wheel rolls
straighter) and jump on - but dont tell my life insurance company. Kick ups are
quite easy.

Rik Less wheels than most

Re: BC wheels

Ok, I didn’t read the subject line, you can all stop mailing me now :slight_smile:


Julian Edwards, Internet Systems Ltd. Woking, Surrey, UK. Internet:
wjedwd@isl.com (preferred) or julian.edwards@isl.com (MSMAIL, aagh)

Woking, n: The feeling you have when you walk into a kitchen and wonder what you
went in there for.