Backward riding

Some of the riders in my group have had difficulty making any progress toward
being able to ride backwards. The riders who aren’t afraid of falling jump
right in and have it pretty soom. The fear of falling backwards seems to be the
major obstacle for the more cautious riders.

Does anyone have any suggestions for teaching backward riding? Getting the timid
past this block?

Thanks,

John Hooten

Re: Backward riding

jhooten@rcsis.com writes:
>Does anyone have any suggestions for teaching backward riding? Getting the
>timid past this block?
>
>Thanks,
>
>John Hooten
Helmets! Seriously, fear is the major hangup for many tricks, and in this case,
a good helmet could help a lot.

I learned backwards 19 years ago as a 14-y-o. It was scary back then, but my
brother and I got it pretty fast.

A learner should set goals like, “Today I will ride backwards two full revs,”
and then up the stakes as each goal is achieved. That way (s)he can feel good
about reaching intermediary goals towards the ends.

This applies to any trick one is trying to learn. In my case, this approach
helped me get the 180 uni spin. It’s hard, but I broke it into its components
and mastered them as much as possible, then put them together. But the fear
factor was the hardest part to get over. I finally had to get masochistic about
it, but I finally got it.

David Stone

Re: Backward riding

For more cautious people I’d guess learning it one half turn at a time from
idling would be best. Once they’ve learnt good idling with both feet it should
be possible to do controlled one turn backwards movements without too much
effort to build up confidence? Also I read somewhere that running backwards
where you’re going to learn before you start can help some people get used to
moving backwards. Back padding might help too, cautious rollerbladers often get
a lot better with knee pads/elbow pads/helmets? Having dismounting off the back
of the uni sorted beforehand might help if they can’t already.

I found that the problem with me was less the fear of falling backwards, more
the fear of hitting people/things behind me and that making sure to look over
the shoulder before any backwards riding and making that part of the learning
process made it okay for me.

Joe

“John Hooten” <jhooten@rcsis.com> wrote in message
news:3A9DF63F.431343FB@rcsis.com
> Some of the riders in my group have had difficulty making any progress toward
> being able to ride backwards. The riders who aren’t afraid of falling jump
> right in and have it pretty soom. The fear of falling backwards seems to be
> the major obstacle for the more cautious riders.
>
> Does anyone have any suggestions for teaching backward riding? Getting the
> timid past this block?
>
> Thanks,
>
> John Hooten

Re(2): Backward riding+haiku

joe_marshall@bigfoot.com writes:
>I found that the problem with me was less the fear of falling backwards, more
>the fear of hitting people/things behind me and that making sure to look over
>the shoulder before any backwards riding and making that part of the learning
>process made it okay for me.
I remember that when I was learning, I made sure no one was behind me and then
simply rode a few revs backwards. Soon I was able to glance back, and eventually
I could look back the whole time. And the wristguards suggestion was right, too:
ppl tend to fall back, endangering their wrists.

Summary (in haiku):

To Aid in Learning to Ride Backwards

No one behind you, Wearing helmet and wristguards, Half revolutions

David Stone

Re: Backward riding

Also wrist guards. Learning to ride backwards causes people to fall to the
ground–something that rarely happens when learning to ride forwards.

Giving people a line to cross–5 to 10 feet out–can also help a lot more than
you’d think.

David Maxfield Bainbridge Island, WA

Re: Backward riding

I am helping my dad improve his backwards skills right now actually. (I love
going backwards!! i do it all of the time). What we are trying is to kinda go
back to basics, and run along a wall with lots of clear space, and then move to
the open where it is clear that there arent’ any obstacles to fall over. And I
find that i don’t look back as I am going back, only if I am about to turn. the
hardest thing about going backwards is getting over it mentally that you
probably won’t fall. I can ride a 15cm wide, 6 meter plank backwards, and when i
fall off, I can just keep going… of course, it is only like a 10 cm drop
though. (my unicycle skills are a bit… varied. I can do some stuff in the
level 8 stuff with relative ease, but stuff like S-O-F i have problems with!!!
BTW- thanks to everybody who gave me hints with that! as soon as I get home (I
am at school now) I’m going to work on it!!

Have fun, Kate


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Re: Backward riding

I was wondering, has anyone started riding down stairs backwards?

Chris

On Thu, 1 Mar 2001, kate scallion wrote:

> I am helping my dad improve his backwards skills right now actually. (I love
> going backwards!! i do it all of the time). What we are trying is to kinda go
> back to basics, and run along a wall with lots of clear space, and then move
> to the open where it is clear that there arent’ any obstacles to fall over.
> And I find that i don’t look back as I am going back, only if I am about to
> turn. the hardest thing about going backwards is getting over it mentally that
> you probably won’t fall. I can ride a 15cm wide, 6 meter plank backwards, and
> when i fall off, I can just keep going… of course, it is only like a 10 cm
> drop though. (my unicycle skills are a bit… varied. I can do some stuff in
> the level 8 stuff with relative ease, but stuff like S-O-F i have problems
> with!!! BTW- thanks to everybody who gave me hints with that! as soon as I get
> home (I am at school now) I’m going to work on it!!
>
> Have fun, Kate
> _________________________________________________________________________
> Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com.

Re: Backward riding

A couple of years ago we were playing around at Stanford University one night. I
think that was the night I was first able to ride off a curb and up to 3 steps.
Bruce was already an expert and as soon as he saw the little flight of 3 stairs,
he turned around and tried riding it backwards. With everyone watching
screaming, “No!”, he went for it and ALMOST made it, and didn’t hurt himself.
But I don’t recall him or anyone else (except maybe David Poznanter a little?)
trying this after that one time. Doesn’t seem like a really good thing to work
on to me…

Have you worked on it?

—Nathan

“Chris Reeder” <reed8990@uidaho.edu> wrote in message
news:Pine.GHP.4.21.0103011008010.15536-100000@raptor.csrv.uidaho.edu
> I was wondering, has anyone started riding down stairs backwards?
>
> Chris
>
>
>
>
>
> On Thu, 1 Mar 2001, kate scallion wrote:
>
> > I am helping my dad improve his backwards skills right now actually. (I
love
> > going backwards!! i do it all of the time). What we are trying is to kinda
> > go back to basics, and run along a wall
with
> > lots of clear space, and then move to the open where it is clear that
there
> > arent’ any obstacles to fall over. And I find that i don’t look back as
I
> > am going back, only if I am about to turn. the hardest thing about
going
> > backwards is getting over it mentally that you probably won’t fall. I
can
> > ride a 15cm wide, 6 meter plank backwards, and when i fall off, I can
just
> > keep going… of course, it is only like a 10 cm drop though. (my unicycle
> > skills are a bit… varied. I can do some stuff in the
level 8
> > stuff with relative ease, but stuff like S-O-F i have problems with!!! BTW-
> > thanks to everybody who gave me hints with that! as soon as I get
home
> > (I am at school now) I’m going to work on it!!
> >
> > Have fun, Kate
> >


> > Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at
http://www.hotmail.com.
> >