Are you designing Uni parts? Check this out

I don’t know anything more than what’s on the site. I certainly haven’t ordered anything from them yet, but this sounds like it could be a good tool for unicyclists who are trying to innovate new unicycle equipment but don’t have the knowledge or tools for fabrication of prototypes.

Check out Big Blue Saw

Apparently, you can design an object in CAD or “your favorite drawing software” and they will machine the part and send it to you.

I’d be interested in hearing the opinions of experienced machinists. Would this be a valid way for people with ideas and limited resources to try to design new distance handles and other uni parts? I dont’ expect to be able to have use-able products created, but I think it could be a way of having prototypes made so that people can share their concepts with others.

that’s just like the eMachineShop:

same idea, I don’t know how the price differs, but they would be great for making parts if you have some $$$ available.

Just something to point out:
They seem to only accept DXF and PNG (or another esoteric file type of a similar name) files, which require some hard to get software to make drawings. AutoCAD is wicked expensive, and it’s a skill in and of its self to be able to make drawings on it. Also, they don’t mention welding, which could restict a bunch of projects.

As for emachineshop, I know a few people who’ve used it, and the parts they got were way out of tolerance, poorly built, and delivered a couple months late.

In the end it seems easier and more economical to go to a local machine shop and talk to them about what you need. Then you can bug them when the parts are late, which is harder with these companies…

I’m the proprietor of Big Blue Saw. I noticed that a lot of people are visiting bigbluesaw.com from this thread.

You don’t need AutoCad or any other expensive software to make parts with Big Blue Saw. We provide a list of good software that’s free or very inexpensive:
http://www.bigbluesaw.com/saw/content/view/16/32/

PNG is hardly an esoteric file format; just about any decent drawing program that supports GIF, JPG, and the like will also support PNG.

Simon Arthur