Anyone ride a uni but not a bike?

Uni’ists…

A bizarre conversation with my girlfriend yesterday (about whether families
exist who go out for Sunday afternoon uni rides) got me thinking about
teaching riding.

Has anyone tried teaching (or learning) to ride a uni without being able to
ride a bike? I wondered if maybe the habit of back-pedalling on a bike is harder
to unlearn than it is to learn to balance on the uni. IE, is it easier or harder
if you can’t ride a bike?

I had a friend who can’t ride a bike who I always wanted to teach to uni just to
see, but unfortunately I’ve lost touch.

Also, at what age have you taught riders? I’m not thinking about practical
things such as uni sizes, but I am interested in hearing when you think a child
could learn, assuming they’re not some progidy like a Sem.

later,

pab.


Paul Bennett pbennett@lssec.bt.co.uk Churchill Engineering Centre BT Software
and Systems Integration tel: (0171)728-7527 PP 6/7, 151 Gower Street, London.
WC1E 6BA fax: (0171)387-6743

Re: Anyone ride a uni but not a bike?

On Mon, 14 Nov 1994 pbennett@lssec.bt.co.uk wrote:

> Has anyone tried teaching (or learning) to ride a uni without being able to
> ride a bike? I wondered if maybe the habit of back-pedalling on a bike is
> harder to unlearn than it is to learn to balance on the uni. IE, is it easier
> or harder if you can’t ride a bike?

I think learning to ride a uni would probably be easier without being able to
ride a bike. I think one of the biggest problems I had when I was starting to
learn was that I expected it to be like riding a bike, when it’s actually a
lot more like walking.

I’m not familiar with the habit of back-pedalling on a bike (wouldn’t do my
gears any good), but the system of gears and a chain does make pedalling a
bike a bit different. It’s a much smoother movement than slowly pedalling a
uni - the cranks don’t get to a vertical position and just stop there. They
carry on round without the extra conscious push that I always found necessary
when I was learning to ride a uni.

----------------Hey, I can see the whole world from here!---------------
| Danny Colyer | bs1dwc@bath.ac.uk | To drop is human, | University of Bath |
| ----------------- | To juggle is divine. |
---------------------http://www.bath.ac.uk/~bs1dwc/---------------------

Re: Anyone ride a uni but not a bike?

pbennett@lssec.bt.co.uk wrote:
>
> Uni’ists…

Unics is our preferred term at HMC…several different connotations… :^)

> Has anyone tried teaching (or learning) to ride a uni without being able to
> ride a bike? I wondered if maybe the habit of back-pedalling on a bike is
> harder to unlearn than it is to learn to balance on the uni. IE, is it easier
> or harder if you can’t ride a bike?

We have a frosh here who is learning to ride a uni but doesn’t know how to ride
a bike. He’s doing pretty well. Maybe we’ll get him up on the Stupid Trick
Cycle next!

A new thread now… How many women unicyclists are out there? I was the
first woman at HMC to ride in a long time, and now there are at least 8 of
us who can either ride or are making a concerted effort to learn. I’ve seen
Sara on this list, and I know Teresa is a Uni Goddess, but how many more of
us are there?

Jennie Hango jhango@osiris.ac.hmc.edu

Re: Women Unicyclists

Jennie Hango <jhango@osiris.ac.hmc.edu> writes:

>A new thread now… How many women unicyclists are out there? I was the
>first woman at HMC to ride in a long time, and now there are at least 8 of
>us who can either ride or are making a concerted effort to learn. I’ve seen
>Sara on this list, and I know Teresa is a Uni Goddess, but how many more of
>us are there?

Please, any other women unicyclists, send Jennie email just to let her know how
many women are on the list. Perhaps she will be willing to post a summary of the
responses to the list.


Perhaps, because of the lack of good female role models such as Teresa Abrahams
and Constance Cotter and unicycling’s unearned reputation for danger, fewer
women have been willing to pursue the sport.

However, unicycling is very much like ice skating, which at least image-wise is
dominated by women. So give the women a little time, encouragement & help and
they will soon dominate unicycling as well. This will do wonders for promoting
our sport as it did for ice skating.

Pairs freestyle as well as women’s freestyle alluded to above, also has great
potential for promoting unicycling as it has in ice skating. Plus its great fun
for the woman, man and audience!

However, we need more women unicyclists and more highly skilled ones. There is
nothing inherently sex biased in artistic unicycling. So women, please catch
up with the men. When you do, unicycling will become a much more wholesome and
FUN sport.

Let’s do some dancing on wheels!

Jenny, thank you for bringing up an extremely important aspect of our sport!

Sincerely,

Ken Fuchs <kfuchs@winternet.com

Re: Anyone ride a uni but not a bike?

I forwarded a copy of the letter wondering what it was like learning to ride a
uni without knowing how to ride a bike to the frosh in our club that isn’t a
“wheel-waster” (a.k.a. bicyclist), and his reply follows…

Jennie jhango@osiris.ac.hmc.edu


Thaddeus Ladd wrote:

Hello, my name is Ted and I ride a unicycle. (Hello, Ted, <applause>…)

When I was a young boy, way back in grade school, my parents bought me a
bicycle. It was the age when most young boys were learning to ride bikes, and of
course I didn’t want to be ostricized.

And so my mother put training wheels on my new bike, and helped me along
by holding me up, pushiing, etc. And when the training wheels were on, I
could ride.

And when my mother removed the training wheels, I couldn’t ride for love nor
money. I’d try; I’d go two feet and fall. And I tried, again, and again, and
again, and let me tell you, it was painful. I completely gave up. My mother sold
the bike to my neighbor, who laughed at me for my deficiency. It was a very
traumatic time.

Whn I came here, to Harvey Mudd College, I was given the oppurtunity to
unicycle. My first attempt met failure. So did my second. So did a third. When
an experienced unicycler saw me, I was of course somewhat embarassed, so I
uttered the excuse “Well, I never learned to ride a bike.” And he said, “Yeah, I
could tell.”

But I persisted. And after a week or two, a unicycle became like a third leg
to me. . .

And if you ask me whther it is easier to learn to ride a bike or a unicycle, I
say a unicycle, for a bike is more of an artificial machine. When you start
riding a bike, the bike is in control, not you. And bikes have minds of their
own. No really! They have an innate malice which force you to smash into walls
and recieve gruesome injuries.

Unicycles, however, are more under the rider’s control. Which makes it harder
for the rider at first, but after not too much time they seem very natural.

I think in total, the amount of wheels on a vehicle is inversely porportional to
the amount of control of the rider.

At least that’s true for me. So, you don’t want to know what happened last time
I tried to drive a car…

                            Sincerely,

                            Thaddeus "Place Your Ad Here!" Ladd

I helped my 7 year old daughter to learn how to ride her uni. She studies ballet and I am sure that made it easier. She is such a showoff. Unicycling is more like balancing on two legs of a chair than bicycling. “Girls rule”.

haha this is a really old thread.

Antique thread :stuck_out_tongue:

PM

start bidding! :smiley:

iw as thinking this guy aint registered…

lol well lets not jack this thread by its oldness but still…

This thread is older than many members of this board…

I also wanted to reply to Jennie, cuz I’m sure she’s still here and reading this :), I think there’s a lot more to do with the respective ages at which learning to ride a bike failed and learning to ride a unicycle was acheived.

I only say this because there are many times when false thinking like this annoys me…though I sure that that message was mostly tongue in cheek.