any thoughts on the nimbus boomerang

I find that once this unicycle is moving it tends to keep going in a straight line - this makes the side-to-side control aspect of wheel walking easier. I believe that it this effect, rather than the greater surface area for your feet, which makes wheel walking easier on this uni.

It would make a great BC wheel for learning on, Think of how smoothly that would roll.

Any chance of you putting one together to try out Roger?

The Boomer (memoriam Sharon Valerii) rides like a 1960’s-era luxury sedan. It is slow to speed up or slow down, and floats over anything smaller than a volkswagen.

As others have noted, it turns like a supertanker. The large tread band sticks to the pavement well, while the large and flexy sidewalls decouple the traction band from the rim. The wheel thus has a mind of its own.

You can actually feel the rim+frame+rider squidge from side to side through the tire, perpendicular to the direction of travel as you go down the road. very odd to this newby, but probably not an unfamiliar sensation to riders with large fat tires.

Lotsa fun, impresses the riff raff and the kids. And it does look cool. JC is correct, it’s definitely a novelty device.

A true kangaroo has an eccentrically built wheel aswell as both cranks pointing the same way, which makes the seat move up and down which is why it’s called a kangaroo, i’d be pretty impressed if you could build one of those wheels yourself at home, from what i’ve heard they’re very difficult.

I think it would be cool to have that tyre and rim on a BC wheel!

Try increasing the tyre pressure and this effect becomes less pronounced. I found the Monster to ride much better at higher rather than lower pressures.

Re: any thoughts on the nimbus boomerang

On Thu, 22 Sep 2005 04:27:16 -0500, “kington99” wrote:

>A true kangaroo has an eccentrically built wheel aswell as both cranks
>pointing the same way, which makes the seat move up and down which is
>why it’s called a kangaroo

Is that so? Do you have a reference? Moreover, if - like you say - it
is called a kangaroo BECAUSE the seat moves up and down, it shouldn’t
even matter if both cranks point the same way.

But in my book, the only requirement for a unicycle to be called a
kangaroo is that the cranks point the same way.

Klaas Bil - Newsgroup Addict

“Unicycling is like glue: you have to stick with it, and it’s not to be sniffed at - Mikefule”

I looked into doing this, you cant find any freewheeling bikes hubs wide enough for the job.

Re: Re: any thoughts on the nimbus boomerang

You’re right.

Here are three pieces of evidence, which might help convince Dave:

  • The kangaroo unicycle sold at UDC US is not eccentric.
  • The UDC UK website says, “We can now build Kangaroo unicycles and unicycles with eccentric wheels.”
  • All of the hits that I looked at when searching for “kangaroo unicycle” on Google made no reference to an eccentric wheel in the definition, or mentioned it separately as a different type of unicycle.

I can’t give a single reference because even if it appears on an excellent website, ‘defined’ as one thing or another, you can’t tell people how to use a term. If the majority use it to mean a certain thing, then that’s what the term means, irrespective of what a so-called authoritative source might say. In language, dictionaries are always catching-up with usage.

I will try that!

thanks for an elegant and direct solution. :duh:

.max

I totally duplicate this observation. Experimentally ,for myselve(77kg) , 35psi is the best option for the easiest turnig.It is a fun uni ,good for me as I have not succeded in becoming SERIOUS unicyclist.:slight_smile:

umm yea i really wouldnt want that uni. seems kinda useless.

Re: any thoughts on the nimbus boomerang

On Sat, 24 Sep 2005 05:00:03 -0500, “rupert” wrote:

>I can’t give a single reference because even if it appears on an
>excellent website, ‘defined’ as one thing or another, you can’t -tell-
>people how to use a term. If the majority use it to mean a certain
>thing, then that’s what the term means, irrespective of what a so-called
>authoritative source might say. In language, dictionaries are always
>catching-up with usage.

You are right, but I think it is practical if words keep the same
meaning for some time and throughout a community, which is why I wrote
my reply: to resist blurring the meaning of a word. Thanks for the
research and the backup.

Klaas Bil - Newsgroup Addict

“Unicycling is like glue: you have to stick with it, and it’s not to be sniffed at - Mikefule”

Yes sure, we have already thought about it, just waiting for the wheel set to come through… Hub is a bit of a problem.

Roger

I hope it is easier than the BC I tried at Bristol, I feel lucky to have walked away from it.

I just inflated it to 35 # and will be going outside in a few minutes, but i wanted to say – it takes a LOT of pumping to reach 35 psi on that tire, jeeze LOUISE! p=vnrt yadda. lots and lots of v there.

.max
“all pumped up”

Q angled cranks

Q angled aluminium cranks 127mm do a lot of good to the fun of riding ‘Monster/Boomerang’ because…there is less rubbing of the knees and ankles against the fork.:slight_smile: