any muni's for sale?

i’m just curious, is there anyone who has a muni that they want to sell? i’m debating buying a kh or not. i know everyone says they are the best, but i really won’t be doing any crazy hard stuff on it other than just riding around on trails and things. so i’m wondering if anyone has anything they’re planning on selling. i am looking to buy something within the next week.
thanks
lindsey

if you really dont care about tire width, you could get a torker DX 24" off ebay. They are about $150 which is a great price because:

      -has a KH style seat

      -has a SPLINED hub and cranks (meaning strong)

      -i think it has alloy pedals

      -the frame can fit a 3" wide tire if you really wanted to                      put one on, of course then youd have to get a new rim....

      -this would be great for what you want to do. And you dont have to be scared about breaking it going off anything 3' or less i think.

-Lee

Re: any muni’s for sale?

The Nimbus Muni 24 is also a great choice, especially for trail riding.
http://www.unicycle.com/shopping/shopexd.asp?id=745

It comes with a 3 inch tire.

This will probably start up another discussion of why you should buy the… Nimbus Muni 24, Torker DX, QUAX, Onza, KH…

Mountain unicycle

Hi, Lindsey! Just thought I’d express my humble opinion on this matter.

You are obviously a skilled and experienced rider looking to move into Muni. Sounds like you won’t be doing much in the way of big drops, however. If this is an accurate assumption, I would recommend a lighter weight mountain unicyle of the non-splined variety. A pair of Kooka cranks can turn a Nimbus 24" into a great mountain machine, capable of handling a fair amount of abuse. I’ve had success advertising for Kooka’s here on the forum, as a lot of people have upgraded from those to splined.

Good luck on your search! Are you going to Moab?

Dan Welburn

thanks for your replies, yes i am trying to go to moab and will most likely. i just have to figure out what i’m going to do for a muni since i’ve been using our clubs one and that one will be in use during moab. so that is one of the reasons i want to buy one. can’t wait to see everyone there!
lindsey

now my question is… does anyone have any negative comments about the nimbus for a beginner muni person like me?

I’ve used one for about 6 months and it’s a great ride. I didn’t do any drops higher than about 18". I’m 200 lbs and and was afraid I’d break it. I’ve recently upgraded to a splined wheelset. For someone lighter and not planning on any big drops it’s a really good uni with a good seat and nice cushey tire for a reasonable price.

The 24" Nimbus would do well for a beginner muni for someone who isn’t going to get into the hardcore and big stuff.

The description says it comes with 150 mm alloy crank arms. I don’t know what brand. But for Moab you’re going to want 170’s. So get a pair of 170 mm cranks either in addition to the 150’s or instead of the 150’s. The Dotek 170 mm alloy cranks should be OK.

The biggest problem I had with the standard square taper alloy cranks on a muni was keeping the cranks tight. You don’t want a crank getting loose during a ride. And just in case the crank does get loose during a ride you want to carry the right wrench to tighten it. Otherwise it’s a long walk back to the car.

If you’re going to use a square taper hub for muni I would recommend also getting a torque wrench so you can get the cranks on to the recommended 40 to 45 foot-pounds. That’ll save you grief along the trail. Back when I was using my Pashely muni I didn’t realize how important a torque wrench could be. I thought I was getting the cranks tight enough with a socket wrench, but now that I have a torque wrench I realize that I was almost certainly not getting the cranks tight enough and I had a few rides where the cranks did come loose during a ride.

Also contact Bedford and find out how much his munis are with the KH hub. One advantage to the splined hubs is that the cranks won’t come loose during a ride. That reliability factor can be worth the extra cost even if you’re not going big.

lilfunky1 had a really sweet light duty trials uni built up for her by Darren Bedofrd for not a lot of money. i was riding around on it last night really solid built XC muni.

I’ve had a Nimbus 26" since last summer and I’m very happy with it. The type of riding I do is more cross-country than real muni (so no big drops or heavy jumping), but I do tend to ride on pretty rough stoney tracks so it gets a lot of vibration. The wheel build seems very good, and is still absolutely true with no loose spokes or creaking. I’ve still got the cheap steel cranks on it and they have given no problems - never needed tightening since I bought it.

The only thing I’ve changed is the pedals, for a spikier pair than the ones that came with it, but only because I like the extra grip, not because the pedals were poor quality.

I’m not too keen on chrome frames (think they look a bit tacky) but that’s just my taste - the plating on my frame certainly seems durable enough, with no rust spots after a very damp winter. A decent quality paint job/powder coat would no doubt put the price up somewhat.

I can’t vouch for the reliability of the normal cotterless axle in drops and hopping though, I don’t do much of that (that’s why I stuck with a normal axle rather than a splined setup).

So I like my Nimbus - “does exactly what it says on the tin”.

Rob

I also have a Nimbus Muni 24. I am extremely happy with it. For the type of riding that you say you are going to be doing, I think that it will be more than perfect for you.

One advantage of the hub and crank on the Nimbus, is that it is lighter than any of the Splined hubs. Makes for a lighter Muni. You also have a lot more choices in replacement cranks if you want different lengths.

I did have to replace my cranks. But, that was because my Muni got run over by an SUV.

You could spend more for a real heavy duty Muni, but I don’t see any advantage except maybe status. Go for the Nimbus and put some of your saved money towards shin pads and wrist guards. You might even have enough money left over to purchase a torque wrench.