Any hints or tips for uniing?

I was just wondering if anyone uses any unusual techniques for getting more control on a MUni, or higher speeds for “on road” etc.

To go faster on a Coker, I bend right down and almost fold in half then put my hands behind my back like a high speed ice skater. This makes you go a lot faster, but I only try it on long empty streches of VERY smooth and straight road, any tiny bumps would cause a nasty face plant due to the fact your hands are behind your back and your face being really close to the ground. If you’re feeling slightly insane, try it some time :wink:

A less dangerous method I use involves moving your legs less and turn the wheel with your ankles, so your feet do a funny flapping thing. It means that you don’t move your legs as much and they dont get tired so quickly. I have 125s on my Coker, but I’m not to sure if it will work with 150s (bigger circle of rotation, more movement in the ankles).

So, anybody out there wish to share their little tips and tricks? Anybody do the same as me?

spinning your legs (and therefore cranks) in smooth circles (as opposed to just mashing down the right pedal, then the left) is a great skill to master, for gaining ‘controllable’ speed

One way to practice ‘spinning’
is learning to ride one footed. You need the circlular motion to get you over the dead spot on top of of the stroke, ao being able to do this with each foot makes spinning easy.

Can’t ride one foot? that’s fine, you can spin with out it. Start on the down stroke, and instead of putting pressure straight down, pull down and back on your foot as well.

Get doing this with both feet and you’ve pretty much gotten it.

This takes more energy while trying to learn it, but it soon becomes sesond nature

Re: Any hints or tips for uniing?

foolish wrote:
> To go faster on a Coker, I bend right down and almost fold in half then
> put my hands behind my back like a high speed ice skater.

Sam, you are young and foolish. :wink:

> A less dangerous method I use involves moving your legs less and turn
> the wheel with your ankles, so your feet do a funny flapping thing. It
> means that you don’t move your legs as much and they dont get tired so
> quickly. I have 125s on my Coker, but I’m not to sure if it will work
> with 150s (bigger circle of rotation, more movement in the ankles).

Yup, this works on 150s - probably not as well as 125s but I can
definitely go faster if I focus on spinning my feet in small circles.

I’m tempted to try 125s but as I’ll be using 150s for Redbull, I’ll
stick with them for a while.

Regards,
Mark.

Fujitsu Telecom Europe Ltd,| o
Solihull Parkway, | In the land of the pedestrian, /|
Birmingham Business Park, | the one-wheeled man is king. <<
Birmingham, ENGLAND. | O

I think I must have missedthe learning bit, I’ve noticed my pedaling becoming much smoother from practicing riding rather than consiously trying to learn it.

Ah yes, my young Padawan, but had you been making a concious effort, you’d be even further ahead than you currently are :slight_smile:

Re: Any hints or tips for uniing?

On Tue, 15 Apr 2003 06:04:45 -0500, foolish
<foolish.lxbzb@timelimit.unicyclist.com> wrote:

>A less dangerous method I use involves moving your legs less and turn
>the wheel with your ankles, so your feet do a funny flapping thing. It
>means that you don’t move your legs as much and they dont get tired so
>quickly. I have 125s on my Coker, but I’m not to sure if it will work
>with 150s (bigger circle of rotation, more movement in the ankles).

This is called ‘ankling’ or sometimes ‘tip-toeing’ and it is a
recognised method to achieve faster and smoother foot rotation. The
way I do it is to think that my knees should stay close together
(vertically). It will work with 150’s too but obviously the leg
movement will be larger.

Klaas Bil - Newsgroup Addict

“When someone asks you, ““A penny for your thoughts”” and you put your two cents in . . . what happens to the other penny? - George Carlin”

Re: Any hints or tips for uniing?

I’ve tried this before. I think there’s still plenty of time to get your hands out. I put my hands under the back of the seat. I like to try as many different hand positions as possible. Now that I have a GB handle, it seems very stable at high speeds with both hands on. It does seem to require more elbow and shoulder action, but that’s not a problem. It also gives you a sensation that I’m leaning much more forward with my upper body. I suspect it’s not as extreme of an angle as it feels.

What I want to know, is what people think of the GB handle as a climbing handle. Maybe I just need more hill practice, but I don’t seem to have as much leverage as a “Miyata lift handle” due to the different angle of the elbow,forearm, & wrist. Any other thoughts?

-Mark