Another "ultimate unicycle"

The recent “ultimate unicycle” discussions have sparked an idea. The goal
is to place the pedals as close to the center line of the unicycle as
possible to eliminate “wobble”. Seems to me the pedals only need to be
close to the center line when the force on the pedal is the greatest
though. Why not hinge the cranks in and out as they rotate to minimize
wobble but still allow the cranks and rider’s legs to pass by the various
bits of the uni? Check out my drawing and explanation of this at:

http://home.rmci.net/howastev/planer_unicycle.htm

Cheers!

Steve Howard

Not a bad idea, although I am not quite understanding of the mechanics of it. The end result is a great idea.

About 10 to 15 years ago there was a bicycle designed around a cam chain ring as it was thought that this might be a more efficient peddle stroke. I think the bike was called the " Iron Man Triathlon". I believe it was discontinued, as the interest did not prove out.

I will have to think about your idea a little more. There could possible be more that one advantage to your concept

Dan

> bits of the uni? Check out my drawing and explanation of this at:
>
> http://home.rmci.net/howastev/planer_unicycle.htm

Wow! An interesting design. But it woudn’t work well for going fast, as
the rider’s feet move side to side as he/she pedals. This would take
getting used to.

I used to worry about whee wobble a lot. Then I finally realized that even
if you remove it all mechanically, the weight of your own legs & feet will
still cause the same problem as they move up & down…

John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone jfoss@unicycling.com www.unicycling.com

“Our time is a most precious commodity, but it’s how we spend it that
makes us rich.” - John Foss

> I used to worry about whee wobble a lot. Then I finally realized that
> even if you remove it all mechanically, the weight of your own legs &
> feet will still cause the same problem as they move up & down…

The last time it snowed (about a year ago, I think) I remember having
fun in the parking lot by riding slowly, then quickly, then
specifically concentrating on wobble, and looking at the snow tracks
that each produced.

No matter what, I could always tell the unicycle track from a bike track
by the wobble (and the lack of a second track during turns)

jeff lutkus

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