A Uni on a Plane

I’d like to know this too! How do you travel with a uni on a plane? We are going
away in March and want to take our three (20", 20", 24") unicycles with us and
can’t quite figure out what to do. Do we take them apart and scatter them
through the luggage? Do we remove the pedals and the seat post and try to take
the wheel on as carry-on luggage? Help would be appreciated. My main concern is
getting the wheel bent. Tina

Re: A Uni on a Plane

My goal when traveling with my unicycle is to make sure that my unicycle gets to
its destination without any damage. I do not want to have a vacation ruined
because my unicycle gets damaged in transit. Because of that paranoia I don’t
just stuff my unicycle in a duffel bag and hope for the best.

Last year when traveling to the California Muni Weekend I put my muni in a
cardboard box that my Semcycle XL came in. The box was just the right dimensions
so that it could be checked as regular luggage without getting surcharged for
being oversized. That worked OK but I still wasn’t comfortable with it.

This year I bought a hardshell case designed to carry two bicycle wheels. With
this case I can comfortably check my uni as baggage and know that it will be OK.
The case is about 26" x 26" x 10". It is sized so that it fits just within the
regular luggage restrictions for the airlines (i.e. it will not get surcharged
for being oversized). The case is actually big enough so that it could hold two
unicycles. It will hold a 26" and a 24". It is possible that it may even be able
to hold 3 unis (20", 20" and 24"), although I don’t have two 20" unis on hand to
try. Two 26" unis most likely will not fit because unicycle wheels are wider
than regular bike wheels due to the cranks and axle bolts. Even though the case
will hold two 26" mountain bike wheels, it will probably not hold two 26" unis.

To fit the unicycles in the case you have to remove the frame, seat, and pedals.
You should leave the cranks on the wheel. To fit a 26" wheel in the case you
have to deflate the tire.

The case is big and it doesn’t have wheels so it is not easy to carry around the
airport. With two or more unis it would also be a bit heavy.

The case I got is the Clam Shell Wheel Safe by Tri All 3 Sports (I don’t think
they consider unicycling to be one of the three sports). They are on the web at:
http://www.triall3sports.com
http://www.triall3sports.com/bikeproducts.html#clamshellwheel

john_childs@hotmail.com

>I’d like to know this too! How do you travel with a uni on a plane? We are
>going away in March and want to take our three (20", 20", 24") unicycles with
>us and can’t quite figure out what to do. Do we take them apart and scatter
>them through the luggage? Do we remove the pedals and the seat post and try to
>take the wheel on as carry-on luggage? Help would be appreciated. My main
>concern is getting the wheel bent. Tina


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Re: A Uni on a Plane

The abuse inflicted on a unicycle on the trails is very different from the
potential abuse that can be inflicted on a unicycle when it is checked as
baggage. When a uni is checked as baggage you have to worry about heavy
suitcases falling on it and other unnatural acts.

Place your unicycle flat on the ground and drop a heavy hardshell Samsonite on
the spokes. You will probably break a few spokes. Take that same suitcase and
drop it on the fork. You could end up with a bent or dented fork. If there is
turbulence during the flight, a rough landing, a careless baggage handler, or a
lousy baggage system there is a chance that your uni could get damaged when
something falls on it.

Most of the time you will be OK if you check your unicycle naked. I prefer not
to risk damage that could be prevented by proper packing.

john_childs@hotmail.com

You’re not paranoid if they really are out to get you.

>As I mentioned before, I just check the unicycle in “naked”. I never had any
>kind of damage to my Miyata unicycles in 20 years of traveling. What kind of
>unicycle do you use? If a unicycle can withstand the punishment of riding down
>steps and rough mountain trails, why in the world would you expect it to be
>damaged in such a “mild” environment?
>
>I think all this effort in making boxes and packages is really unnecessary.


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Re: A Uni on a Plane

-----Original Message----- From: John Childs <john_childs@hotmail.com>

>Most of the time you will be OK if you check your unicycle naked.

Unless you get caught by security and are forced to put your clothes
back on. :wink:

Wayne.

Re: A Uni on a Plane

Why not just build a giraffe which is a suitcase. People have made giraffes out
of doors, so you could do something similar. It would be like some crazy
performance bike. You could open your suitcase, fold the wheel out one end, the
seat out the other, and you’d be away.

Or maybe not :slight_smile:

nic

At 22:49 31/10/99 +1100, you wrote:
>I am currently building a pull apart 5 ft. giraffe especially for when I need
>to travel on small planes with limited space. It will 3 ft. long suitcase.
>
>Wayne van Wijk
>
>
>

Re: A Uni on a Plane

I am currently building a pull apart 5 ft. giraffe especially for when I need to
travel on small planes with limited space. It will 3 ft. long suitcase.

Wayne van Wijk

RE: A Uni on a Plane

Up until now I have also always sent my unicycle on planes naked. This worked
well until my last trip to France. Not only was my unicycle lost for two days
(fortunately on the return trip) but when I got it back the wheel was so out of
true that it rubs the frame. Needless to say I am search for a tough case to
carry it in. jd

-----Original Message----- From: Seth Golub [mailto:seth@thehouse.org]
Sent: Tuesday, November 02, 1999 4:26 AM To: Unicycling-list Subject: Re: A
Uni on a Plane

“John Childs” <john_childs@hotmail.com> writes:

> The abuse inflicted on a unicycle on the trails is very different from the
> potential abuse that can be inflicted on a unicycle when it is checked as
> baggage.

It’s true. I’ve seen baggage fall off the baggage truck, get caught under the
wheel, and get dragged/crushed for 100 feet. I often drop my uni on rocky
terrain, but I haven’t yet managed to run over it with a truck.

Re: A Uni on a Plane

Greetings

In message “A Uni on a Plane”, Mom4491971@aol.com wrote…
>I’d like to know this too! How do you travel with a uni on a plane? We are
>going away in March and want to take our three (20", 20", 24") unicycles with
>us and can’t quite figure out what to do. Do we take them apart and scatter
>them through the luggage? Do we remove the pedals and the seat post and try to
>take the wheel on as carry-on luggage? Help would be appreciated. My main
>concern is getting the wheel bent. Tina

I do absolutely NOTHING. Once in a while I have to argue about letting some air
out, but I usu. win that argument. Sometimes they force you to wrap it in a
plastic bag. You should never need to remove the pedals or seat. I have been
doing this very frequenctly over the last 20 years.

Regards, Jack Halpern Kanji Dictionary Publishing Society, http://www.kanji.org
Voice: +81-48-481-3103 Fax: +81-48-479-1323

Re: A Uni on a Plane

why not mail them to yourself at the fed ex or UPS office in your destination
town? or if you have someone you’re meeting, overnight it to them. It adds extra
$ but it’s insured. if going to a convention, perhaps the organizer could
recieve them for you.

just a thought.

Brian Berlin Austin, TX

Re: A Uni on a Plane

Putting the unicycle on as is would have cost extra on the airline that we flew
to San Jose to go to the California Mountain Unicycle Weekend, and the airline
could not insure anything that was not in standard luggage. Check with your
airline for maximum sizes.

We were able to ship our unicycles as checked on baggage at no extra fee by
building boxes for them out of 1/2 inch cdx plywood and some 1 by 1 inch poplar
slats inside the corners. I screwed the plywood to the slats and the box was
just big enough to hold the assembled wheel and frame. The seat and pedals came
off and fit in the remaining spaces, along with the safety gear and odd piece of
clothing. I did also take off the tire to get the box size under the 62 inch
total dimension, hieght plus width plus depth, that the airline required. I
sanded a bit and rounded off the corners and we had no problem checking them in
although they did recieve a bit of scrutiny.

They were probably not insured because they were not in standard luggage, but I
defy any baggage handler to break those boxes.

Re: A Uni on a Plane

Mom4491971@aol.com wrote:
: I’d like to know this too! How do you travel with a uni on a plane? We are
: going away in March and want to take our three (20", 20", 24") unicycles with
: us and can’t quite figure out what to do. Do we take them apart and scatter
: them through the luggage? Do we remove the pedals and the seat post and try to
: take the wheel on as carry-on luggage? Help would be appreciated. My main
: concern is getting the wheel bent. Tina

I don’t do any thing to them beyond taking the pedals off and softening the tire
a little to let the baggage handlers think they won the arguement. Once I got
the uni back with the tyre compleately deflated. The other unis have traveled
fine. Coming back from Eurocycle this summer there were 6 unis on the baggage
carosel at once, and 3 riders waiting for them, one more uni was in parts inside
a backpack (I can’t push 3 at once:-))

sarah

Re: A Uni on a Plane

I simply take a box used for shipping bicycles, cut it in half, remove the
pedals, and a 28" uni fits perfectly inside. Tape it up and your ready. Extra
tires and pads also fit inside. Been traveling for years like this and never had
any damage or extra charges applied.

“Ein rad oder Kein rad”

Re: A Uni on a Plane

Greetings

In message “Re: A Uni on a Plane”, John Childs wrote…
>
>My goal when traveling with my unicycle is to make sure that my unicycle gets
>to its destination without any damage. I do not want to have a vacation ruined
>because my unicycle gets damaged in transit. Because of that paranoia I don’t
>just stuff my unicycle in a duffel bag and hope for the best.

As I mentioned before, I just check the unicycle in “naked”. I never had any
kind of damage to my Miyata unicycles in 20 years of traveling. What kind of
unicycle do you use? If a unicycle can withstand the punishment of riding down
steps and rough mountain trails, why in the world would you expect it to be
damaged in such a “mild” environment?

I think all this effort in making boxes and packages is really unnecessary.

>Last year when traveling to the California Muni Weekend I put my muni in a
>cardboard box that my Semcycle XL came in. The box was just the right
>dimensions so that it could be checked as regular luggage without getting
>surcharged for being oversized. That worked OK but I still wasn’t
>comfortable with it.
>
>This year I bought a hardshell case designed to carry two bicycle wheels. With
>this case I can comfortably check my uni as baggage and know that it will be
>OK. The case is about 26" x 26" x 10". It is sized so that it fits just within
>the regular luggage restrictions for the airlines (i.e. it will not get
>surcharged for being oversized). The case is actually big enough so that it
>could hold two unicycles. It will hold a 26" and a 24". It is possible that it
>may even be able to hold 3 unis (20", 20" and 24"), although I don’t have two
>20" unis on hand to try. Two 26" unis most likely will not fit because
>unicycle wheels are wider than regular bike wheels due to the cranks and axle
>bolts. Even though the case will hold two 26" mountain bike wheels, it will
>probably not hold two 26" unis.
>
>To fit the unicycles in the case you have to remove the frame, seat, and
>pedals. You should leave the cranks on the wheel. To fit a 26" wheel in the
>case you have to deflate the tire.
>
>The case is big and it doesn’t have wheels so it is not easy to carry around
>the airport. With two or more unis it would also be a bit heavy.
>
>The case I got is the Clam Shell Wheel Safe by Tri All 3 Sports (I don’t think
>they consider unicycling to be one of the three sports). They are on the web
>at: http://www.triall3sports.com
>http://www.triall3sports.com/bikeproducts.html#clamshellwheel
>
>john_childs@hotmail.com
>
>
>
>
>>I’d like to know this too! How do you travel with a uni on a plane? We are
>>going away in March and want to take our three (20", 20", 24") unicycles with
>>us and can’t quite figure out what to do. Do we take them apart and scatter
>>them through the luggage? Do we remove the pedals and the seat post and try
>>to take the wheel on as carry-on luggage? Help would be appreciated. My main
>>concern is getting the wheel bent. Tina
>
>______________________________________________________
>Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com
>
>

Regards, Jack Halpern Kanji Dictionary Publishing Society, http://www.kanji.org
Voice: +81-48-481-3103 Fax: +81-48-479-1323

Re: A Uni on a Plane

“John Childs” <john_childs@hotmail.com> writes:

> The abuse inflicted on a unicycle on the trails is very different from the
> potential abuse that can be inflicted on a unicycle when it is checked as
> baggage.

It’s true. I’ve seen baggage fall off the baggage truck, get caught under the
wheel, and get dragged/crushed for 100 feet. I often drop my uni on rocky
terrain, but I haven’t yet managed to run over it with a truck.

Re: A Uni on a Plane

Greetings

In message “Re: A Uni on a Plane”, Unicycle17 wrote…
>Putting the unicycle on as is would have cost extra on the airline that we
>flew to San Jose to go to the California Mountain Unicycle Weekend, and the
>airline could not insure anything that was not in standard luggage. Check with
>your airline for maximum sizes.

It’s true that they make you sign that they arev not responsible for damage.
But a stadard 24 inch uni is definitely accepted, but normally treated as
odd-sized baggage,

>We were able to ship our unicycles as checked on baggage at no extra fee by
>building boxes for them out of 1/2 inch cdx plywood and some 1 by 1 inch
>poplar slats inside the corners. I screwed the plywood to the slats and the
>box was just big enough to hold the assembled wheel and frame. The seat and
>pedals came off and fit in the remaining spaces, along with the safety gear
>and odd piece of clothing. I did also take off the tire to get the box size
>under the 62 inch total dimension, hieght plus width plus depth, that the
>airline required. I sanded a bit and rounded off the corners and we had no
>problem checking them in although they did recieve a bit of scrutiny.

But that is so much extra work in vain! I just tell them, " and international
uniycling teams have been checking unicycles in for years, don’t worry, allis
well". Someting like that. And if I have any trouble, there is always the
ultimate solution. I say:

“Can you ride a unicycle” “No, my goodness…” “It’s really wasy, look”]

And I ride around by the check-in counter. I always get smiles or applaud and
the unicycle goes through. This really works!

>They were probably not insured because they were not in standard luggage, but
>I defy any baggage handler to break those boxes.
>
>

Stay on top, Jack Halpern, IUF Vice President Website: http://www.kanji.org

Re: A Uni on a Plane

Greetings

In message “Re: A Uni on a Plane”, Brian Berlin wrote…
>
>why not mail them to yourself at the fed ex or UPS office in your destination
>town? or if you have someone you’re meeting, overnight it to them. It adds
>extra $ but it’s insured. if going to a convention, perhaps the organizer
>could recieve them for you.

Why is everyone thinking of the most trtoublsoome solutions? I just check it in
and 95% of the time have no problems.

>just a thought.
>
>Brian Berlin Austin, TX
>
>
>
>

Regards, Jack Halpern Kanji Dictionary Publishing Society, http://www.kanji.org
Voice: +81-48-481-3103 Fax: +81-48-479-1323