a quick, simple question

what do the ‘sharp turns’ in the iuf skill levels entail? is it a twist, an ordinary leaning turn, or anything that’s tight enough?

I believe it is any form of a turn as long as it is performed withing one square meter

I believe they are within a 1m diameter circle. I use reaction turns, which are the turns where you twist your body (Action=reaction). The leaning turns are more useful for bigger turns. Spins are a leaning turn, they can be of quite a tight radius, too.

There are three types of turn:

  1. The thre’p’ny bit turn (a UK English term!) in which the unicycle goes round a corner in a series of jerky tyre-scrubbing moves.

  2. The sharp turn in which the unicycle completes the turn (whether it be 90 degrees or 180 degrees) sharply, in the space of one downward stroke of the pedal (usually the “inside” pedal).

  3. The sweeping turn in which the unicycle leans like a bicycle.

I’d guess (2) is the one you’re after.

ah, right. thank you. now i only have stomach on seat to worry about before i reach level 4.

sorry for clogging RSU for such a basic question, and let’s hope this thread descends out of the way quickly.

[edit]

didn’t see the other posts. how would you accomplish number 2, then? you say it’s done without leaning?

The forum is here for you to ask questions. Don’t apologise.

Number (2) does involve leaning, but the emphasis is on the timing - a sudden sharp turn in time with a single pedal stroke, rather than a gradual turn over several strokes.

hmm… i’ll see whether i can do that or not.

following the line of questioning, i’ve always wondered about pirouettes. how difficult are they, and what does it actually involve? i can’t quite fathom the physics of it.

[QUOTE=krring]
hmm… i’ll see whether i can do that or not.

following the line of questioning, i’ve always wondered about pirouettes. how difficult are they, and what does it actually involve? QUOTE]

Depends which sort you want to know about. There are two distinct types: pirouettes of Penzance, or pirouettes of the Caribbean.

Depends which sort you want to know about. There are two distinct types: pirouettes of Penzance, or pirouettes of the Caribbean.

why do people concern themselves with levels? im not with that really. all it proves is that you can do a bunch of little things. i go for big things. keeps it more fun. thats just my opinion.

Mike still has it! :sunglasses: :smiley: I suppose this is a new high or new low, depending on whether you liked it or not.

I don’t know which version of the iuf skill levels you refer to. The most recent version that I could find online is from 2004, see http://www.unicycling.org/iuf/levels/ . There is no mention of ‘sharp turns’, but some turns have to be performed within (or inside) a 1 meter circle. I take that as being a diameter of 1 meter. So podzol’s answer was most accurate.

The USA skill levels on http://www.unicycling.org/unicycling/skills/skills.html do speak of sharp turns. So it seems that USA and IUF have a slight difference there.

To further compound the issue, on a page about the USA skill levels (see http://www.unicycling.org/usa/levels/ (copyright 2000)), under 10.4 it is stated that ‘sharp turns’ means that the turn has to made within a 1 x 1 meter square, and the supplied diagrams support that. This is probably a relict of an older version. Lower in the same document, under the level descriptions, the ‘circle’ descriptions are used, complete with the same ‘within’ versus ‘inside’ as in the IUF skill levels.

Klaas points out a minor weak point in the skill levels as written:
http://www.unicycling.org/iuf/levels/
(Both IUF and USA use the same text in the levels; only the additional detail is different)

I believe the intent with the 1 meter circles is to confine one’s turns to a 1m radius, in the case of the 90 degree turns, and a 1m diameter for the 180s. The people who came up with the 1m square for the USA levels showed their greater amount of experience with level testing. The turn radius is still about the same, but it’s much easier to see if the rider completed it within the space.

A bunch of little skills equals one big level. What’s another example of a big thing? People who are interested in levels are ones looking for a structured set of challenges, or perhaps a way to “quantify” their relative ability to do the kinds of skills within the levels. They are not for everyone, just for those who have “chosen” to be interested.

Another minor weak point there. A 90 degree turn of 1 meter radius does not fit in a circle with a 1 meter diameter. It would fit in a 1 x 1 meter square, as per the drawings that I refered to and that seem to be part of the rules.

To many people, such things may seem too much ado about nothing. But with some more thought, these inconsistencies are avoided without it being any more wordy or difficult to understand. I mean this in a constructive way, not to nag. I know a few more of these ‘errors’.

i’m not all that concerned with levels, but i like to keep track of them as an aside. i was mistakenly referring to http://www.unicycling.org/unicycling/skills/skills.html, thinking those were the iuf ones. couldn’t you just idle your way round that, though?

well, please enlighten, mike. what is the difference?