232 Feet but still problems

I have read once i get 50 feet, I can go continuously. I made it 232 feet (37 24" wheel revolutions) but Im sitll having trouble staying balanced. Suggestions?

e39m5

Practice.

Stop counting revolutions, and just think about riding. When you fall, think about what made you fall, and whether or not that had something to do with your technique, and try to fix what you were doing wrong.

Balance will come with practice. Get on, ride, fall, analyze, repeat. You’ll get the hang of it eventually, it just takes time.

Dave

it really just takes practice… I found that once I could ride about as far as you, I still couldn’t stay on forever because my legs got tired. This went away very quickly though. Put more weight on the seat, that might help…

First, congratulations on riding 232’…that’s a true milestone - your really on your way already.

Balance comes with practice, eventually it will be instinctual.

This may sound like silly advice, but don’t think about it…just relax and pedal smoothly. Look at a distant point and let your body get used to balance correcting. Oh, and don’t pick-up hitchhikers.:smiley: - sorry couldn’t resist.

I agree with roadkill–Congratulations on the 232 feet!
I remember my first unassisted 50 feet–it was less than a year ago, and it was the greatest feeling.
Unicycling is an endless series of accomplishments, one after the next. Take them one at a time. Before you know it, those 232 feet are going to feel like nothing, and you’ll be working on a new goal.
Keet it up, and keep your back straight, and whatever you do, don’t think “too much” about the particulars, just enjoy every inch of progress. It will come before you know it…

This was going to be my suggestion too. Don’t look down right in front of you. Hold your head up and focus at some distant destination. Look forward about 20 or 30 feet, not 5 feet. This will help with the balancing.

Re: 232 Feet but still problems

On Fri, 20 May 2005, mucRider wrote:

> This was going to be my suggestion too. Don’t look down right in front
> of you. Hold your head up and focus at some distant destination. Look
> forward about 20 or 30 feet, not 5 feet. This will help with the
> balancing.

Agreed.

It’s a built-in thing in your body that you wind up being where you are
looking. So if you’re looking at a distant target, you’re likely to get
there. If you’re looking at the ground in front of you, you’re likely to
wind up there instead.

Cheers,

Stu

Stu wrote:"…if you’re looking at a distant target, you’re likely to get there. If you’re looking at the ground in front of you, you’re likely to wind up there instead."

Well said Stu…we get what we focus on.

How do you focus on the horizon when you have to negotiate the lumps & bumps beneath you?
Cathy

Focusing on the horizon helps divert the thinking while learning…it sets-up a goal. After some hours on uni, the body “learns” the balance points and we relax more - less tense throughout our muscles. Then we can look at obstacles in the path and maneuver instinctually, without fighting ourselves, because balance has become second nature.

I’ve been looking at the moon while I ride. If I ever have a lunar landing, I will write a Mikefule-style ride report. :slight_smile:

Hey, e39m5, congratulations on your very fast most excellent progress. See you at the unicycle club meeting?

uni57 wrote:
"I’ve been looking at the moon while I ride. If I ever have a lunar landing, I will write a Mikefule-style ride report. "

Good response ! :smiley:

And, I’ll join you - I was looking up at the stars, the other night, while riding.

Lol I used to count pedal revalutions when I was learnin. I used to play against my bro to see who could get the most padals, I always won

Re: 232 Feet but still problems

On Fri, 20 May 2005 16:32:33 -0500, “cathwood” wrote:

>How do you focus on the horizon when you have to negotiate the lumps &
>bumps beneath you?

Good question. You look mostly at a distance and you can spot most
trail features at 20 or 30 feet away. Then when they need closer
inspection when you’re approaching them, glance at them again briefly
when you’re almost there. That way, you ‘read’ the trail and build a
mental image of it while you go so. Obstacles are often best dealt
with in combination so that by processing your mental image you can
choose the best line to ride. Obviously, to accomplish that you need
to read the trail ahead. Finally, when you’re past an obstace it is
ready to drop out of the short-term memory space reserved for the
trail image.

Klaas Bil - Newsgroup Addict

wouldnt you be grumpy if somone just said you had PMS? - jagur

Re: Re: 232 Feet but still problems

232 feet and you still have problems!?!?
I’ve only got two feet, and I’ve just gotten to the point where I only need one to ride! (Still need both to mount, though.)

Serious:
Practice.
I’m about the same as you with going backwards. I can regularly make it 50 feet pretty easily, but rarely more than about 200. Some of that’s because I can’t see bumps, but usually it’s just because my balance fails. But, I used to be able to say the same thing about going 10 feet consistantly and 50 feet rarely backwards…keep practing, and you’ll be doing 250 ft regularly and 1,000 occasionally.

And, I personally would put the distance a lot higher than 50 feet for how far you need to be able to go before you can do it forever…probably closer to 1/4 mile or so.

It just takes practice.

Well, thanks for the comments. Im going to really try focusing on a certain spot now, and keeping more weight on the seat. My legs do get tired. I also pulled off my first free mount yesterday. The one where it rolls underneath you, I cant do a static mount for some reason. I really want to get to the NYUC meeting today, it actually just started. My mom doesn’t seem to want to drive me because of the Henry Hudson collapse.

e39m5

well, I waited for my dad to get home from some meeting. I got to go for about an hour before the rain started to come in. Apparently I missed quite a few people (heard about johnfoss on a BC) and unicycles. But from the people that were there, I got some mounting tips, and just some riding tips. I almost pulled off a turn around. Maybe next time I’ll get there on time instead of 5 hours late. Im noticing that my feet slide off the pedals quite a bit, I dont want spikes on the pedals because ive gotten nailed in the calf quite a bit. Any ideas for that?

e39m5,

It was nice meeting you today. I’m glad you could make it to the meeting and meet some of the members. Come back soon! And keep practicing… you are doing great!

(Also, when we were talking about impossible wheel riding, I mentioned John Foss’s amazing riding. But I didn’t mean that he was at the meeting today before you got there. He actually visited us last year.)

Get some good shinguards, most of those just wrap around your entire lowerleg, and so protect almost everything. Mine even have ankleguards (Thank the lord)