1.75 vs 2.5 inch wide tires

Ok, i went out and got a mountian bike tire for my uni. I wanted to see if there were any differences between the two tires. I put the tire on, inflate it, and go for a check ride. Well, during the ride, I kept falling over either to the left or right, when I was in a turn. Even riding in a straight line was difficult at times. My nimbus came with a 2.5 tire, which I love on rides. This new tire is 1.75.

Will it just take time to get used to the 1.75 over a 2.5? Or should I throw the 2.5 road tire back on and order a 2.5 mountain tire? Either way doesn’t bother me. It just seems as though riding on a 1.75 is way more challenging than a 2.5. I hope i didn’t fix myself to sticking with 2.5 tires from hence on…

It could be because the new tire has a more square profile, it just takes practice.

Tire pressure!

If you’re using the same pressure as you had in your 1.75 tire, it’s too much. A tire like the Gazzalodi rides terrible if there’s too much air in it. But at the same time, the right amount of air for dirt is usually less than the right amount of air for pavement.

That said, some tires are better on unicycles than others. I currently have a Kenda Klaw XT on my 29", and it’s basically annoying to ride on either. It’s fine going straight, but you really have to pay attention when cornering.

Yes, you want a basically rounded tread area on unicycle tires, without too much corner. Corners are fine, as long as they don’t touch the ground on pavement, for instance. So anyway, experiment with your tire pressure and I’m sure you’ll see some improvement. Beyond that, some tires just ride better than others. Remember the general rule of tire pressure: At least enough to keep the rim off the ground on the terrain you’re riding. That means more for pointy rocks and less for sand.

It doesn’t really change much of what you said but the new tire is the 1.75, he said he switched to it from having used the 2.5.

My tire pressure on both tires is between 25 and 30 psi. My first tire, i pumped it up to 65psi, needless to say, there was a ‘gunshot’ sound that came from me tire when it exploded. I find between 25 and 30 works well for me weight (250ish).

I can find a tire that’s 2.5 rated for trails. Its just a bugger on corners, as well as the straight ways with the 1.75 tire.

MTB tires are getting more and more square, if this is the problem, deflate a bit, if it is a fairly round tire, you need a slackline and more practice:D

My bad. Why did you want a skinnier tire for unicycling? Fatter tires was the the biggest riding improvement in MUni. Splined axles are a strength improvement, and seats are comfort improvements but a fatter tire makes a hard trail easy and an easy trail rideable.

That said, now it sound like you have not enough air in your skinny tire. In my early days of MUni I did a lot of riding on 24 x 1.75 tires. We usually ran these tires at 60 psi or higher for riding on pavement. But on my local trails, I learned I couldn’t run them a lot lower, as we had lots of sharp rocks. If your trails are less rocky you can use lower pressure, but your riding quality problems could be because the pressure is too low.

No, really!

My bad. Why did you want a skinnier tire for unicycling? Fatter tires was the the biggest riding improvement in MUni. Splined axles are a strength improvement, and seats are comfort improvements but a fatter tire makes a hard trail easy and an easy trail rideable.

That said, now it sound like you have not enough air in your skinny tire. In my early days of MUni I did a lot of riding on 24 x 1.75 tires. We usually ran these tires at 60 psi or higher for riding on pavement. But on my local trails, I learned I couldn’t run them a lot lower, as we had lots of sharp rocks. If your trails are less rocky you can use lower pressure, but your riding quality problems could be because the pressure is too low.

No, really! Of course the ride will be harsher with higher pressure, and it will generally be more challenging. This is a good thing for improving your skills. :slight_smile:

Yeah sorta low pressure and fat tire. 3.0 is great. Skinnier would be weird.

I think (and i maybe wrong about it) but if it was any skinnier, it would be considered low profile. Wouldn’t it??? :thinking:

Not sure what that means but I dont want my tire any skinnier :stuck_out_tongue:

alright, thanks guys. I will put me 2.5 tire back on and order me a 2.5 muni tire, or something close to it. I tried the 60psi thing when I first got my nimbus. And that resulted in a blown tire. Now I inflate me tires to the point where if i squeeze it, there is a bit of give, but not much, which is usually around 30psi. I’m a bit hesitant to try anything above that, considering my size and previous experience.

it doesnt matter to much, but 2.5 is prolly easier to ride with, where the other one is prolly lighter.
Id want the 1.7 over the 2.5 i think.

Avoid tires with a central ridge or a tread pattern that is ridge-like because they make the unicycle try to fall one side or the other of the ridge a you ride along

jim

Low profile tyres
The tyre’s profile is the height of the sidewall compared with the width of the tread, expressed as a percentage. A number of 60 or lower is considered low profile. Some performance tyres are ultra low, eg 45 series. Low profile tyres have better grip on dry roads/surfaces but a firmer ride because they are stiffer. Very low profile tyres are not suitable for off-road use and they are more likely to puncture. Standard tyres are usually softer and ride more comfortably but have less grip and more flexing in turns and at high speeds. Tread design is important in wet weather grip; most low profile tyres have a high performance tread with open pattern and good wet qualities. The wider the tyre, the more water you have to shift from under the wheels on a wet road.

Rubix, I’ve had a similar problem switching from a 24 X 2.25 street tire to a 24 x 2.5 Maxxis High Roller. The High Roller has worked great on the dirt trail. However, we have had so much rain lately, that I have only been on the dirt trail 3 or 4 times.

Riding on the street is much more of a challenge. The tire’s width seems to accentuate my side to side movement, making balancing a lot more work. It also takes a much greater effort to pedal. However, the tire does soak up the small road imperfections that would have stopped me cold on the 2.25 tire.

I have experimented some with air pressure, but have not found a pressure that I like for street riding. For the trail, 45 lbs works great. Since I am still a newbie, with about 2.5 months of uni experience, I am sure that is a big part of this issue. Path of it could also be the tires tread pattern/shape and the durometer of the tire.

Peace,
Randle

On the whole, a fatter tyre will be easier for most aspects of unicycling. However, the profile is important.

Look at a car tyre from behind. The tread - the contact patch with the road - is flat, and the tyre has side walls that are almost vertical.

Now look at the back tyre of a modern motorbike. The contact patch is narrow, and the tyre curves up at each side.

If you lean a car tyre, it tips onto the narrow edge between the tread and the sidewall, and is unstable.

If you lean a motorbike tyre, it rolls smoothly into the turn. The size of the contact patch barely changes.

The ideal unicycle tyre has the rounded cross section, like a motorcycle tyre.

On my first MUni, I tried various tyres. I tried cheap ones, and I tried a Gazzaloddi 2.3" which was not cheap. I found the uni almost unrideable on tarmac, and a handful off road. I then bought the Holy Roller tyre “on a whim” and it changed the unicycle from being a pig to being fun to ride.

Better to have a good profile than a fat tyre with a bad profile. Best is to have a fat tyre with a good profile.

(Says me, with a 23mm tyre on one uni!)

Tyre pressure also matters. Too soft and the profile loses shape; too hard and the tyre can’t shape around minor changes in the surface, and the tread can then “smear” and affect the steering.

Thanks all

I believe I have found my ideal pressure for street, at least, at 30 psi +/- 5. It handles great and don’t really have any complaints. My street tire is a Maxxis Hookwork. I was just trying to see how an offroad tire would handle on my uni. Maybe I need to get an actual Muni to try it, instead of modding the one I have now. Its no biggie really, just wondering if the tire size had anything to do with the handling of the uni, which now I know it does.

I am still new at this whole ‘unicycling’ sport. So please forgive me if I make stupid mistakes. Just don’t be too harsh on the noob in pointing them out. I will stick with my hookworm and do some more research before I dedicate some $$ on an offroad tire.

…as for now, time to throw on the hookworm and get some cycling in before this low pressure system makes it way over to our neck of the woods. Suppose to get real ugly real quick!

That’s all referring to car tyres though, I’ve never seen a bike tyre advertised with a specified aspect ratio. Tread block flex and water displacement aren’t an issue at uni speeds. I can’t see and pluses of having a low profile tyre ona uni, whereas for performace cars it’s considered a must.

Mikefuel, what size Holy roller are you using, 24 x 2.4?

Peace,
Randle