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Old 2016-11-21, 08:09 PM   #46
Bradford
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pierrox View Post
I was looking for a place to ask for advice, instead of starting a new thread, and I came across something I had touched on earlier this year. It's linked for sure...

Been doing a lot of stretches to work on that, but there's still something I find myself doing when I get tired, or if it's not a great session, or I get into a stressful situation (traffic for instance): I don't sit even on the saddle. I can clearly feel that my right sitbone is fully seated, whereas my left one is not. It just doesn't feel fully in contact with the saddle. I'm trying to force it down, but it just doesn't want to. Any advice? Any exercices? On or off my uni?
It still never made any sense to me. Riding twisted disappeared for me just as suddenly and mysteriously as it appeared. I finally just gave up and tried to ignore it. After a while, I happened to notice it went away, and I was VERY happy about that. I honestly don't know why it started or stopped.

The only two things I can think of are a happy accident with a UPD and a huge increase in riding off road.

I had a pretty bad UPD where I fell flat on my back on a manhole cover while trying to jump up on it (it was elevated above the ground a few inches). Not only was I not injured, but it seems to have straitened my back quite a bit, and I felt really great afterwards. How weird is that? I didn't pay a lot of attention to it, but it seems that was around the time that I stopped riding twisted. Maybe my back was just really out of alignment. Just like you, I still don't sit even on the saddle, and I'm still doing everything else I did before when I was riding twisted.

The only other thing I could think of is that it also seems to have gone away after I started riding my muni off road a lot more. I was so concerned about just staying upright that I didn't pay any attention to whether or not I was riding twisted.

Hope you're able to figure it out. It drove me batsh*t crazy while it was going on.
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Old 2016-11-21, 11:40 PM   #47
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Pierrox, I will repeat myself but what I strongly recommend is to ride with both hands on the handlebars nearly 100% of the time.
Once you get the hang of it and you have ridden hundreds of km this way, you no longer feel twisted, even when you ride a handlebar free unicycle, except if there is a damned strong road camber of course.
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Old 2016-11-22, 03:01 PM   #48
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Hey Pascal,
I've been doing that too, but I still feel there's something more ingrained in my body, and I've been going back to the really basics to re-learn some stuff - as ElPuebloUnido suggested in another thread:

Quote:
Originally Posted by elpuebloUNIdo View Post
If there's something slightly-off about your riding technique, I'm not sure that putting in more miles is going to change the problem, especially if that is a habit of riding; you may, instead, reinforce the problem.
So lately - also because weather hasn't been amazing - I've also practiced a lot in the garage under the building, with my 20". I can now circle around to the left in a 2 meters circle (6ft). And not surprisingly with what I wrote earlier, doing that to the right is in a much bigger circle, and not as confortable. All those exercices are improving my riding, so I'll keep doing them. As well as other "tricks" that I'm sure will help generally - different mounts, with my dominant foot, but also my weak foot, idling (dominant and weak), riding back, and so on.
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Old 2017-06-19, 01:20 PM   #49
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I've been riding lately with improving my posture in mind. I know I'm still twisted, after years of uni. But today I had the weirdest experience. After a couple of weeks only on my 29", one day I removed the shim I added to make the frame true. It didn't change my twisting problem but I'm getting better at it. This uni is very prone to road camber (or maybe it's me) but it turns very easily, thanks to its very "pointy" Big One tire. It turns so easily I can do a 10ft circle no problem.

And today I took the 36". Riding was awful. It seems that all the things I worked on with the 29" had the opposite effect. I felt physically more twisted to the left than ever, and yet I could not turn left (my favorite turn). I could only do right turns.

After an hour or so of an non-enjoyable ride - made worse by the heatwave - I went home. In the garage, I hopped on the 29", looking forward to a uni I can sort of master. Nothing worked. It took 10mn to be able to throw it in a turn like I use to be able to do.

Since I removed the shim and now have the wheel slightly with an angle, I wonder if the 36" is angled the other way. Anyway, that's just me looking for excuses to lower the frustration of still feeling like a beginner after 5 years of regular riding.

/End rant/
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Old 2017-06-19, 04:47 PM   #50
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You guys with twisting (riding) problems... Do you ride one sided or are you ambidextrous?
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Old 2017-06-27, 03:27 PM   #51
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As for me, I have found that I twist to the right, when
1. the road slopes to the right
2. the wind comes from the right
3. the saddle is turned to the left.
The effects compensate in the sense, that I can ride without twisting when on the left side of a country road with wind from the right side.

Woudn't it be logical to have a saddle that can be switched to different positions while riding to make riding with side wind or on a sideways slope easier?

Just a thought...
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Old 2017-08-15, 10:03 PM   #52
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After learning to ride along a wall 5-years ago, falling hard on my hip, and giving up, I took it back up mid June and am having a blast. All was going good riding our paved trails. I finally got to the point where distance wasn't limited to leg strength but rather saddle comfort when suddenly the twist happened. Each day I couldn't get past twisting to the right while riding my 29er or 36er. Absolutely could not shake it. I looked like I was pulling a wagon as someone earlier in this thread commented. Thinking about it, I learned with the wall to my right and I believe I would tend to lean into the wall. With my left thigh rubbing the frame every pedal stroke I knew I was riding all wrong. I went out and purposely shifted my hips to the right whiel riding and suddenly I was straight again.

This morning when I was out on the trail, I noticed that when I needed to pass by people, go between bollards, or rough transitions, I would instantly go to that right twist with my right arm out to the back doing the balancing wave. So it's obvious when I tense up, that's my position. Being a beginner, I have to ask the experienced riders is this at all normal? When I'm sitting on it square hipped and shouldered, it's comfortable, but I'm not as confident the wheel is going to go exactly where I intend it to. When I'm all twisted up, it feels like all the crazy forces in my body fighting each other and wearing me out do keep the wheel going exactly where I want it to go. I'm certain saddle time will eventually answer this for me but I'm too anxious to hear the end of the story so I need to ask you experienced guys that have been through this learning process. Thanks
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Old 2017-08-15, 11:08 PM   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TMason View Post
I'm certain saddle time will eventually answer this for me but I'm too anxious to hear the end of the story so I need to ask you experienced guys that have been through this learning process. Thanks
Yes, you are correct. Time in the saddle fixes most riding issues. Just keep on pedaling, and try to stay relaxed. It takes a while, but eventually you'll get comfortable.
Cheers!
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Old 2017-08-15, 11:26 PM   #54
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Yes, you are correct. Time in the saddle fixes most riding issues. Just keep on pedaling, and try to stay relaxed. It takes a while, but eventually you'll get comfortable.
Cheers!
I've found that 'the twist' comes back when I make any drastic changes to my unicycle, and straightens itself out once I'm comfortable again. When I changed from a 29er to a 36er, twist came back. Shorter cranks, lighter tyre/foss tube, twist came back. Handlebar, twist came back. Went to a geared uni, twist came back.

I genuinely think the twist is a product of that harsh, janky riding style we all do when we first learn - I tend to do it when I make the above changes because I start riding harder on my legs, just like when you first start riding, thanks to nerves. Once the change grows on me the twist goes away
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Old 2017-08-16, 06:22 AM   #55
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When I was learning I would also go for rides and only use one hand for the whole ride.
Next ride on the same trail use the other hand for the whole ride.

You will quickly see what grips and forces help smooth out your ride on different trail conditions. (sloping right trail, sloping left, level, etc...)
You may also eliminate any one sided bad habits by learning to grip differently for different trail conditions.

Just commit.
Get handlebars and zipstrip your hands to the bars.
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Old 2017-08-16, 08:27 AM   #56
pierrox
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TMason View Post
... So it's obvious when I tense up, that's my position. Being a beginner, I have to ask the experienced riders is this at all normal? When I'm sitting on it square hipped and shouldered, it's comfortable, but I'm not as confident the wheel is going to go exactly where I intend it to. When I'm all twisted up, it feels like all the crazy forces in my body fighting each other and wearing me out do keep the wheel going exactly where I want it to go. ...
I feel you!
What this thread made me understand is that whilst more riding helps getting better and irons stuff out, it also engrains the bad habits deeper.
I've been going through a phase where I'm sort of re-learning -it's a long process- because in my case, the twisting also comes from not relaxing enough and driving the uni with the feet/upper body more than with the core/hip. I'm getting better, I can really feel it when the uni just glides under me, with my feet flying on the pedals. But each time I get into a stress situation -suddenly people on the sidewalk, steep side slope- I tense up and twist. And then it takes me a long time to come back to the more relaxed position. To help, I'm now chanting a little mantra I read here, inspired from a Kris Holm quote in his book "relax the muscles you don't use". It seems to help.
Another reason behind the tension could be some deeper fear of hurting yourself. Whilst it's amazing how DH riders just throw themselves into a steep rocky track, part of me freezes before the obstacle, from some deep fear of falling and hurting myself. Childhood memory... it's much harder to overcome!
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Old 2017-08-16, 09:19 AM   #57
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Quote:
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Yes, you are correct. Time in the saddle fixes most riding issues. Just keep on pedaling, and try to stay relaxed. It takes a while, but eventually you'll get comfortable.
Cheers!
Not necessary, like Pierrox said time can also dig the bad habits if they are not fixed.
I had this twisted issue during my 5 first years of riding.
Using the upper body for balance + not relaxed enough was the reason.
Riding with both hands on a handlebar was the cure.
What Eddie says also makes sens, every change can involve enough stress to make the twist stuff back, probably because we tend to put more effort on a pedal than on the other and because we tend to be tight.

So, learn to ride with both hands on a handlebar, or on the seat handle and then you'll just have to focuse on the relaxing part.
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Old 2017-08-16, 08:55 PM   #58
TMason
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Originally Posted by pierrox View Post
I feel you!
................. it also engrains the bad habits deeper.
I've been going through a phase where I'm sort of re-learning -it's a long process- because in my case, the twisting also comes from not relaxing enough and driving the uni with the feet/upper body more than with the core/hip. I'm getting better, I can really feel it when the uni just glides under me, with my feet flying on the pedals. But each time I get into a stress situation -suddenly people on the sidewalk, steep side slope- I tense up and twist. And then it takes me a long time to come back to the more relaxed position...................
Thanks for the responses. I agree practicing bad habits does engrain it deeper. It's been said perfect practice makes perfect. Just glad to hear I'm not the only one!! I went out and rode 6-miles breaking it up into 1 mile segments with rest. I was able to stay square passing people and bollards. I think I'm going to make a point of dismounting at the first sign of twisting, rest, and then get more practice freemounting the 36er! I'm having way too much fun learning all this.
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Old Yesterday, 01:00 AM   #59
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When I'm all twisted up, it feels like all the crazy forces in my body fighting each other and wearing me out do keep the wheel going exactly where I want it to go.
Yup, sounds like the situation for the average beginner rider. First it's a big fight; your body vs. your brain vs. your body. Then with time, you learn to turn off the body parts that aren't needed, and you can relax more.

Because your "default" position seems to be with a right-hand twist, I recommend practicing lots of left turns and circles. Get yourself used to going that way, which is easiest with some amount of twist to the left. Big circles and small ones.
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Originally Posted by Canoeheadted View Post
When I was learning I would also go for rides and only use one hand for the whole ride.
That's pretty awesome, but most beginners are going to insist on using both feet on the pedals. Don't be such a show-off.

Of course you probably meant hand holding the seat. But this is not necessarily comfortable for new riders; it usually comes later. It's not a bad idea though. On rough terrain we hold onto the seat to keep from bouncing off the uni. Or on smooth terrain to keep things straight while we go fast. Try doing that with either hand, but concentrate on using your right hand more.
Quote:
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So, learn to ride with both hands on a handlebar, or on the seat handle and then you'll just have to focus on the relaxing part.
Don't worry about a handlebar at this stage; that's for specialized or long-distance riding. But the both-hands idea is also a good one. It focuses your body in a straight-ahead position, and also requires more attention to do without letting go. It may take a while before you can even do it for any distance.
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Old Yesterday, 04:24 PM   #60
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Originally Posted by UniDreamerFR View Post

So, learn to ride with both hands on a handlebar, or on the seat handle and then you'll just have to focuse on the relaxing part.
I agree with John that it's probably not for newbies, but using both hands on the handlebars on my 36er has made me a much better rider on all unicycle sizes and activities. Since I've learned to balance without using my hands and arms, I can now ride with my hands clasped behind my back, and juggling while riding has become much easier. Riding twisted is also now a distant memory.
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