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Old 2018-02-09, 12:16 AM   #16
elpuebloUNIdo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by finnspin View Post
The skill you need for riding SIF (properly) is distributing your weight evenly on your legs, no matter which position they are in.
I stressed out my arms learning SIF. I had to hold onto the seat very tightly because I was not distributing my weight well on the pedals. Since then, however, I have learned how to ride two handed SIF, which greatly reduces the strain on the arms. Now, I can hold onto the seat gently with one hand. It has taken time to develop that skill. It has been pretty typical for me to have a rough, inelegant technique when learning new things. I read a lot of posts by good riders that seem to suggest that the way to learn new techniques is to perform them properly, as if proper technique is a antecedent to learning, rather than a consequence. Understanding good technique is fine, but I am even more interested in the series of baby steps that'll get me there.

When I am riding both hands on the bars, I don't think of balance as coming from the upper body. I think of it as coming from the center of the body, from the hips. I don't see what is slow about that form of balance. I am capable of making sudden hip motions with my hands on the bar ends.
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Old 2018-02-09, 12:31 PM   #17
finnspin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elpuebloUNIdo View Post
When I am riding both hands on the bars, I don't think of balance as coming from the upper body. I think of it as coming from the center of the body, from the hips. I don't see what is slow about that form of balance. I am capable of making sudden hip motions with my hands on the bar ends.
Your hands are a lot faster at making adjustments than your hips will ever be, that's why everyone rides one handed for difficult trails. On normal terrain, a good rider doesn't need the hand for adjustment, allowing them to have them both on the handle. As a rider get's better, his adjustments become slower and less frequent. Beginners flail their arms around like crazy, while better riders barely make any noticable motions to correct their point of balance.

Quote:
Originally Posted by elpuebloUNIdo View Post
It has been pretty typical for me to have a rough, inelegant technique when learning new things. I read a lot of posts by good riders that seem to suggest that the way to learn new techniques is to perform them properly, as if proper technique is a antecedent to learning, rather than a consequence. Understanding good technique is fine, but I am even more interested in the series of baby steps that'll get me there.
That's not typical for you, that's typical for any rider that learns a new skill. It takes two things to learn something: Knowing what you need to do (that may not always be concious), and actually being able to do what you need to do. Some tricks, you have to do the technique 100% right from the start. You will not be able to do a 540° unispin at all if you don't do the technique completely right, while you will be able to do some amount of SIF or wheelwalk with bad technique.

People struggle at different parts of the process, non unicycle example: I have a friend that looks at a bouldering route, and usually struggles with finding out what moves he needs to do, but if you tell him: "put your weight on your right foot, move your hip over, and now slowly push up on your right leg", he will be able to perform them flawless. I struggle with actually doing what I know I need to do more.

As far as baby steps go: some skills are easily broken down into them, some aren't. I highly recommend using them to learn if there are any, the way you learned SIF is doing exactly that. I just don't think riding SIF is an appropriate baby step for riding with a handlebar, since while it contains one similar part, it's not the key ingredient.
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Old 2018-02-09, 02:42 PM   #18
elpuebloUNIdo
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Originally Posted by finnspin View Post
As a rider gets better, his adjustments become slower and less frequent.
I am going to have to think about that. For me, it seems to apply to some situations, but not to others. For some conditions, I think my adjustments are getting smaller and more frequent, quick tiny adjustments that may not even register to an onlooker. On the other hand, As I improve, I'm able to better predict what kind of correction to make, giving me more time, slowing down the adjustment. I think your comment is correlated to beginners' inefficiency.
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