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Old 2017-12-09, 07:41 AM   #31
candyapplecorn
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Just chiming in, I own a 20" Sun Extreme DX. It's not as nice as an impact but I got it on Craigslist for $90 so ayyy amirite? It's very solid and good for learning new tricks, as it's a 20". Between my 29", 26" and this Sun, it's my go-to for attempting new tricks and commuting on sidewalks amongst pedestrians spewing forth from BART subway escalator exits. I recently began teaching a friend using the 20" and my friend was able to pick up basic balance etc very quickly on the thing.
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Old 2017-12-09, 03:53 PM   #32
elpuebloUNIdo
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Originally Posted by Up Rite View Post
Unicycling is difficult enough to learn as it is. I choose going with something to make this as easy as possible. I will be going to different and more difficult wheel sizes later on. This is far more sensible.
The problem with advice on this forum is that there are too many variables. This makes apples to apples comparisons difficult. What works for me may not work for you. I'll keep giving out advice, and you can take it or leave it.

I had no idea a steel frame could bend enough to act like a spring. My guess is, however, that other factors may be involved in the steel-framed unicycle shooting out from under you. Are the cranks shorter on the steel-framed unicycle? Are the pedals less grippy?

As a beginner, during UPDs, I bailed out in awkward pedal positions. I had to train myself to wait for the remaining foot on the crank to reach the 6:00 position, before removing it. If I remember correctly, this helped keep the unicycle from shooting out from under me.

Wishing your KH a speedy recovery!
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Old 2017-12-09, 07:28 PM   #33
bungeejoe
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Up Rite View Post
Unicycling is difficult enough to learn as it is. I choose going with something to make this as easy as possible. I will be going to different and more difficult wheel sizes later on. This is far more sensible.
Many of us learned on a piece of crap unicycle. Took many of us about 10 hours to learn. Some more, some less. One of my friends learned in less than a single 3 hours stretch on grass starting from a tree in a campground on a custom unicycle with a Surly Larry 3.8 tire. You might say less than optimal circumstances. Was he a natural? Young? No, he was mostly an ordinary Roy. But he was obsessed with mastering the unicycle. "You can't do it that way" was not an acceptable answer. The only thing he did was "Ride it!"

The final paragraph in a recent Black Friday post By Vernon Felton
Posted Nov 24, 2017 nearly sums up my advice.
https://m.pinkbike.com/news/your-bik...t-opinion.html



His final paragraph reads

"All the shiny bull$h!t that we bolt onto our bikes the other 364 days of the year? That stuff has no greater worth than the experience of riding your bike. It’s easy to confuse the two sometimes. Easy to get lulled into thinking that your bike isn’t good enough already. Easy to think that a new fork or wheelset will make you a better rider. They won’t. Not really. Riding will make you a better rider. Riding will make you stronger. Riding will make you happier. Spending your day shopping or worshipping at the altar of New-And-Improved? That $h!t just makes your wallet lighter."

What you learn on is not the problem. We are the problem. The more we "Ride it" the sooner the brain will "click" (adapt to the circumstances).

Just go "Ride it!"
JM
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Old 2017-12-10, 03:57 PM   #34
Up Rite
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bungeejoe View Post
Many of us learned on a piece of crap unicycle. Took many of us about 10 hours to learn. Some more, some less. One of my friends learned in less than a single 3 hours stretch on grass starting from a tree in a campground on a custom unicycle with a Surly Larry 3.8 tire. You might say less than optimal circumstances. Was he a natural? Young? No, he was mostly an ordinary Roy. But he was obsessed with mastering the unicycle. "You can't do it that way" was not an acceptable answer. The only thing he did was "Ride it!"

The final paragraph in a recent Black Friday post By Vernon Felton
Posted Nov 24, 2017 nearly sums up my advice.
https://m.pinkbike.com/news/your-bik...t-opinion.html



His final paragraph reads

"All the shiny bull$h!t that we bolt onto our bikes the other 364 days of the year? That stuff has no greater worth than the experience of riding your bike. It’s easy to confuse the two sometimes. Easy to get lulled into thinking that your bike isn’t good enough already. Easy to think that a new fork or wheelset will make you a better rider. They won’t. Not really. Riding will make you a better rider. Riding will make you stronger. Riding will make you happier. Spending your day shopping or worshipping at the altar of New-And-Improved? That $h!t just makes your wallet lighter."

What you learn on is not the problem. We are the problem. The more we "Ride it" the sooner the brain will "click" (adapt to the circumstances).

Just go "Ride it!"
JM
More like just go break it.

How many times do I have to repeat myself?

When I started out at close to 400 lb bodyweight, running more than the maximum PSI in the given tires, I flattened the tire and hit the rim. This included 19" trials rims and tires. No high PSI tires are available for 19" rims, so I had to go with a customised 20" rim with a high psi tire that could hold over 100 psi of air.

People watching me practice on the steel chromed trainer say they see it flexing, I feel it flexing, and it is just a matter of time until it gets flattened.
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Old 2017-12-10, 04:01 PM   #35
Up Rite
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elpuebloUNIdo View Post
The problem with advice on this forum is that there are too many variables. This makes apples to apples comparisons difficult. What works for me may not work for you. I'll keep giving out advice, and you can take it or leave it.

I had no idea a steel frame could bend enough to act like a spring. My guess is, however, that other factors may be involved in the steel-framed unicycle shooting out from under you. Are the cranks shorter on the steel-framed unicycle? Are the pedals less grippy?

As a beginner, during UPDs, I bailed out in awkward pedal positions. I had to train myself to wait for the remaining foot on the crank to reach the 6:00 position, before removing it. If I remember correctly, this helped keep the unicycle from shooting out from under me.

Wishing your KH a speedy recovery!
I do want to replace the pedals on both with something grippier. The new KH pedals look much better for grip, and the pedals and any moisture do not get along on the trainer pedals at all. I think better pedals would help. carnks are 127mm on the square taper, 137mm plus Q-factor on the KH moments.
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Old 2017-12-10, 04:04 PM   #36
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Originally Posted by johnfoss View Post
I don't really know if the wheel is un-strong, but I do know that it rides very oddly, so would be lousy for learning on. Trials/Muni wheels are the way to go.
That is my impression. Doesn't restrict you to just practicing on perfectly flat ground. I would take my KH out to a fence in a field and get in decent practice on uneven ground. I could practice in areas impossible on the steel framed learner.
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Old 2017-12-10, 07:38 PM   #37
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Originally Posted by Up Rite View Post

How many times do I have to repeat myself?
Don't worry, I'll try not to repeat myself…
… it would just be a waste of my time.

I'll just make excuses to go "Ride it!"


Because I can!
JM
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