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Old 2018-08-15, 11:45 PM   #16
lightbulbjim
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Originally Posted by Setonix View Post
might just get an extra 26" to use in Thailand
If you're always travelling to the same place then you could buy a dedicated uni and store it at your family's place. No need to worry about flying with it then.
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Old 2018-08-16, 06:31 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by Setonix View Post
This year there was the NKE (Dutch Championships Unicycling) and for most competitions, a 24" was required. Only for 5 and 10km runs the wheelsize was free choice. I didn't compete, just watched what it was about.
I also rode 10km with my 19" trials two times, but I don't like having to spin like crazy all the time. A 24" might be easier for that. Still I'd use the bigger sizes for longer distances.

My wife and kid are from Thailand and I go on holiday there every year. It would be nice to have a uni there too, even though it is so hot. A 24" seems nice enough for exploring outside of the big cities and small enough to take onto an airplane in a suitcase.

Then lastly if I were to buy a 24" should I take one with knobby tire like muni or with a road tire.
.
Standard class racing is fun, but unless you do it competitively, it is a lot to spend on something you may not use much.

There are a couple of things to consider:

The 24" standard class is any wheelsize less than 618mm. This actually allows 26" rims to be used, provided you use a skinny tyre (26x1"). Many of the top track and 10k standard racers use this wheelsize, rather than a 24".

A 26" wheel has more options for off-road tyres when you are not doing standard class racing. You need a relatively skinny 26" rim...I run a Velocity VXC rim which works great with a 26/x1" tyre for standard class, but is also capable of taking a 26x2.4" tyre to work as a lightweight MUni.

Last edited by GizmoDuck; 2018-08-16 at 06:33 AM.
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Old 2018-08-16, 08:34 AM   #18
Setonix
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Originally Posted by lightbulbjim View Post
If you're always travelling to the same place then you could buy a dedicated uni and store it at your family's place. No need to worry about flying with it then.
true, it will only be a one way flight with it. With 9 unis at home, I can easily do without it. Taking it with me on the plane seems a better solution to me than buying one on unicycle.com and have them ship it to Thailand. Half of the addresses there are obscure and it might just get lost. the parents of my wife just found a piece of land way back when and decided to put their house there.
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Old 2018-08-16, 08:38 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by GizmoDuck View Post
A 26" wheel has more options for off-road tyres when you are not doing standard class racing. You need a relatively skinny 26" rim...I run a Velocity VXC rim which works great with a 26/x1" tyre for standard class, but is also capable of taking a 26x2.4" tyre to work as a lightweight MUni.
And wheels with such narrow rims still have the same hub width? So it would be as simple as shifting wheels. My KH26 Muni doesn't have a brake which means just unscrewing 4 bolts and changing a wheel. Changing wheels is easier than changing tires
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Old 2018-08-16, 09:05 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by Setonix View Post
Changing wheels is easier than changing tires
.... and cranks in most cases when changing tyres.

Swapping wheels is unbelievably fast especially using a ball ended Allen key. The bolts can be spun in or out in seconds. Then just tweak the saddle height (using the same key) and you are on your way.
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Old 2018-08-16, 09:10 AM   #21
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Also remember there is absolutely nothing to stop you putting a 24 inch wheel in your 26 inch frame when you need a standard uni. The seat height is governed by the cranks not the wheel and the fork length is irrelevant as long as it clears the tyre.
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Old 2018-08-16, 10:59 AM   #22
Setonix
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Also remember there is absolutely nothing to stop you putting a 24 inch wheel in your 26 inch frame when you need a standard uni. The seat height is governed by the cranks not the wheel and the fork length is irrelevant as long as it clears the tyre.
Yes ok handn't thought of that. That brings the price a lot down if I only buy an extra wheel.
On the other hand on http://municycle.com, I can also see the cheaper 24" unis are cheaper or the same price as just a wheel :

https://www.einradladen.com/507mm-24...le-Qu-ax-Luxus

Since I don't plan on doing serious training for competitions and because I'd use the bigger wheel sizes to go for bigger distance, a cheap 24" will suffice my needs. My bday is still 3 mths away, so I have enough time to make up my mind.

It is clear that everybody has different views and aims with their unicycles, but they are very helpful for me to find out what is important to me. The chance is big that I will add a 24" uni to my collection and however my mood is for the day, will prolly take it for a spin, like yesterday I rode the Hatchet, which I hadn't touched in a few months. People already look funny when I ride through town on one wheel, but they seem more impressed by the fatty wheel even.

Last edited by Setonix; 2018-08-16 at 11:14 AM.
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Old 2018-08-16, 12:33 PM   #23
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I have a 20 fatty, 20", 24muni, 26Muni, 26, 32, and 36. I haven't been on the 24" yet. I find the 26" muni the most fun, and the larger sizes more challenging. So I'm staying with large. I don't think I'll go back to the 20", unless I'm riding it indoors. I did pack the 26" as luggage, but a 24" would have been easier, where I wouldn't have had to take the tube & tire off the rim. I'd say no. But I do like the 24" wheel idea.
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Old 2018-08-16, 08:36 PM   #24
GizmoDuck
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Setonix View Post
And wheels with such narrow rims still have the same hub width? So it would be as simple as shifting wheels. My KH26 Muni doesn't have a brake which means just unscrewing 4 bolts and changing a wheel. Changing wheels is easier than changing tires
It's a cross country rim, not unusually narrow. The trend with unicycle rims is that wider is better (not a bad thing), except you can't put a 26x1" tyre on them.

The rims all take the same hubs.

Good idea with just building a new wheel- much cheaper option if you are unsure.
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Old 2018-08-16, 11:22 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by OneTrackMind View Post
Yes we always need another uni. I originally thought nine would be about right but I find myself with sixteen wheels.

For want of a better expression, the 26 is the smallest of big unis while the 24 is the biggest of the small unis. Two wheels (muni and road) with a single 26 inch frame is very portable and covers a lot of riding scenarios especially with two hole cranks.

It becomes a serious riders' touring kit when you put a Schlumpf in the road wheel.
So if one day I got a Nimbus Hatchet 26 and wanted something more tuned to road work, I could just swap in a road wheel and rim on the frame instead of buying a new unicycle? Or is the Hatchet somehow too specialized to make that possible ... or practical/sensible/whatever?
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Old 2018-08-17, 12:55 AM   #26
lightbulbjim
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Originally Posted by Dingfelder View Post
So if one day I got a Nimbus Hatchet 26 and wanted something more tuned to road work, I could just swap in a road wheel and rim on the frame instead of buying a new unicycle? Or is the Hatchet somehow too specialized to make that possible ... or practical/sensible/whatever?
It has an extra-wide hub (125mm bearing pitch vs the standard 100mm), but otherwise yes.
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Old 2018-08-17, 08:42 AM   #27
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Originally Posted by Dingfelder View Post
So if one day I got a Nimbus Hatchet 26 and wanted something more tuned to road work, I could just swap in a road wheel and rim on the frame instead of buying a new unicycle? Or is the Hatchet somehow too specialized to make that possible ... or practical/sensible/whatever?
Yep, you would need a wheel laced for it with the wide hub, as lightbulbjim said before me. But the nice thing about it, is that you could turn your Hatchet into a mean road uni. On the presentation page, it says you can fit up to a 32" wheel in there!

Last edited by pierrox; 2018-08-17 at 08:43 AM. Reason: Typos
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Old 2018-08-17, 04:04 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by lightbulbjim View Post
It has an extra-wide hub (125mm bearing pitch vs the standard 100mm), but otherwise yes.
Quote:
Originally Posted by pierrox View Post
Yep, you would need a wheel laced for it with the wide hub, as lightbulbjim said before me. But the nice thing about it, is that you could turn your Hatchet into a mean road uni. On the presentation page, it says you can fit up to a 32" wheel in there!
Great, thanks guys!

I had no idea it was that versatile.

It has definitely shot up another few rungs in my consideration of what I might buy if I find my 24 limiting. That won't be for a long time, but I appreciate the help so I can get an understanding of these things.
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Old 2018-08-18, 06:40 AM   #29
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In answer to the original question:
Of course! Not having a 24" wheel is like ignoring a big part of the legacy of commercially available unicycles, and the size used for basic uni-racing!

Historical perspective:
Once upon a time, unicycles mostly came in two flavors: 20" and 24". 16" wheels could be found, but they were rare and usually intended for kids too small for a 20". This of course may vary depending where you are from; Switzerland famously was doing unicycle racing on 26" wheels, Germany did "Group Standard Skill" (Kunst-Einradfahren) on 26" wheels also but for most of the world, if unicycles were available at all, they came in those basic sizes from the 1960s through 1990s.

Before the 1960s there were very few unicycles available that you could buy anywhere; and I know very little about what was actually available.

In the early 1970s in the United States, they started doing National Unicycle Meets. The competitions basically consisted of a series of races on an athletics track (or parking lot if no track available), and trick riding competitions, similar to what we now call Freestyle and Open-X. For the first several years they had race categories for both 20 and 24, but by 1978 or so it was just 24", with 20" reserved just for the younger kids.

This made life simple in terms of equipment; you needed one unicycle for racing, tricks and whatever else you were doing. This made it easier to add a giraffe, handlebar uni or other variations but rarely other wheel sizes, which would have to be handmade.

My formative years of unicycling were on 24" regular unis and 6' tall giraffes. The 24" was the do-everything unicycle, great for tricks, and fun to ride fast on because you could usually run out of crashes at even your highest speeds. Remember, nobody was jumping off cars or riding down trails made of rocks, because the unicycles would just break. But we did ride on dirt, jump up and down bleachers, ride down sand dunes and otherwise find creative ways to break them anyway. In fact, if you look down that list of Things not to do, you'll see a lot of 20" and 24" wheels, and some Schwinn Giraffes.

I love my old 24" Miyata. It was broken for many months after Unicon 18 (I had to find a replacement early 80s Miyata hub) and I really missed it. I did all of my Freestyle for the first three years on that size, and, years later, it was my first Muni.

The "Standard Track Unicycle" with the 24" wheel and 125mm cranks comes from that era. Actually it was originally 140mm (5.5") because that's what came on the Schwinns. And we have stuck with those dimensions into the 21st century. the 618mm actual tire diameter limit is based on 24 and one-third inches, a size that was arbitrarily chosen for being "reasonably close to 24 actual inches, while allowing for some variations on various tires. We were aware at the time that this also allowed for skinny 26x1 wheels, which was also fine. They're not that much bigger than a plain old 24 x 1.75" tire.

How come we still race 24" wheels when bigger ones are available?
Firstly we don't; we use bigger sizes for almost every form of racing that's outside the track. But why stick with an archaic (and increasingly irrelevant) smaller wheel size for the track? Apparently because people like that size. We tried introducing 700c racing (basically 29" wheels) a couple of times, and it never caught on. Maybe someday. Or maybe people like the simplicity, or being able to run out of a dismount at top speed.

What do I think about that wheel size?
I love the way it rides; that it's great for cruising around while not being too big to stash easily in the car (or in a wide enough suitcase). I guess I also love how it connects me to my earliest days of unicycling, and all those uni competitions back in the day where I won lots of races. In many ways I think it's the best wheel size for just riding around on, or going short distances.

Notice I'm not mentioning 24" Muni wheels here. I have one, on my trusty old Wilder. But it's not really a 24" wheel; it's almost 26". An actual 24" wheel would be a bit small for trails, IMHO. Now I have an even bigger 26" KH Muni. That tire is probably about 28.5". Nothing wrong with that either. But if you want to make an easy trail harder to ride, try it on a 24x1.75" uni with 60 pounds of pressure in the tire (you have to use that much, or risk pinch flats on the rocks). It's great, challenging fun!
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Old 2018-08-18, 06:55 AM   #30
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Not having a 24" wheel is like ignoring a big part of the legacy of commercially available unicycles
If you're buying it for historical reasons then make sure it has cottered cranks and an uncomfortable saddle!
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