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Old 2019-08-03, 08:52 AM   #16
Fezder
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I noticed this thing on my longer ride (around 5km total, so not even long). 29" with 152mm cranks. Now that I did 7.6km ride yesterday, there were couple things that I noticed causing rubberbanding of speed before, but which were smoother now;

-Backback. I have camera, 840ml water, cellphone (well, smatphone, but whatever), and speaker for brake time loosening. Even this all small load added differential to weight distribution I was used earlier without backback at all.

-Bumps on road (potholes and such). Quick accerelation of speed and then breaking bit due uneven road surface.

-Going back to normal riding posture AFTER riding uphill. Since I need to balance differently when going uphill, this method caused havock to my normal ridng speed; way too fast. This is even worse in one place where there is downhill right after uphill, not normal surface.

These all issues have gotten better by just riding more, along with downhill riding and dealing with road camber where I need to lean body differently.
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Old 2019-08-05, 02:59 PM   #17
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hmm good points as I have just started riding with a camel pack for water recently. I need add a strap between the arm straps in the front as it moves around quite a bit
OK so I got the new cranks and yeah very little difference from 150 to 140
but I'm going to ride with them some and see how it feels, I didn't raise the seat any so everything is going to be a little different. probably won't get to ride till later in the week if then as we are getting hammered with afternoon rains.
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Old 2019-08-06, 09:10 AM   #18
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Also, depending on terrain holding (pulling) saddle helps me on keeping more constant speed on rougher terrain. Takes a while to getting used to holding saddle during ride, but give it shot too. Like when going uphill and needing extra power to legs and to keep my ass better on saddle, as well as when going faster since I can bring my body more forward causing center of balance to shift more.
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Old 2019-08-07, 04:45 AM   #19
slamdance
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No hands practice

You know what no hands on a unicycle means, right?
Yes, both hands on the seat and just using your legs(pumping pedal) for control. Your upper body helps but it's mainly the pedaling force(both down and forward). Have you ever tried to ride a trail or paved road with both hands holding the seat. How do you go straight? How do you correct when you start veering to one side? You handle bar guys know what I'm talking about. It's all in the pedaling.

Pay attention to downward force and forward force. When riding super slow on grass it's all pumping down hard and slow on the pedals(4 to 8 o'clock) with very little weight on saddle and swaying side to side. When riding on smooth surface and you want to go faster without "swaying" it's all about fully "weighted" on your seat and subtle equal forward force on the pedals(like from 11 to 1 o'clock). For some reason I like to visualize what those lumberjacks do when they are balancing and rolling a log under their feet.

Last edited by slamdance; 2019-08-07 at 04:48 AM.
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Old 2019-08-07, 03:28 PM   #20
elpuebloUNIdo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slamdance View Post
You handle bar guys know what I'm talking about. It's all in the pedaling.
Not to get into a disagreement, because there are so many different riding techniques out there, but for me there's more going on than just pedaling.

Handlebars can be used for steering, just like the handlebars on a bicycle. And, also like a bicycle, holding the bars allows you to shift the unicycle and your body relative to one another in a left-right fashion. Learning to hold on with one, then two hands, shifted the locus of balance from my upper body down to my hips. I sit on the back edge of the seat and place a lot of weight downward on the bar ends. In this position, the forward/backward motion of the unicycle is stabilized, and I can hit pretty hard bumps without being thrown off.

I learned to ride short distances with both hands on the seat...before learning how to do anything really useful with my hands on the bars/seat. Over time, however, I learned the added forms of control with the hands (referred to above). At that point, taking a hand (heaven forbid both hands) off the handlebars started to seem like a loss of control.
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Old 2019-08-08, 08:14 AM   #21
OneTrackMind
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slamdance View Post
You know what no hands on a unicycle means, right?
Yes, both hands on the seat and just using your legs(pumping pedal) for control. Your upper body helps but it's mainly the pedaling force(both down and forward). Have you ever tried to ride a trail or paved road with both hands holding the seat. How do you go straight? How do you correct when you start veering to one side? You handle bar guys know what I'm talking about. It's all in the pedaling.

Pay attention to downward force and forward force. When riding super slow on grass it's all pumping down hard and slow on the pedals(4 to 8 o'clock) with very little weight on saddle and swaying side to side. When riding on smooth surface and you want to go faster without "swaying" it's all about fully "weighted" on your seat and subtle equal forward force on the pedals(like from 11 to 1 o'clock). For some reason I like to visualize what those lumberjacks do when they are balancing and rolling a log under their feet.
You also said this in another recent thread.

We all have different techniques but I recon steering like you describe isn't what most of us do at all. I lean the unicycle using my hips with the pedalling being all about drive.
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Old 2019-08-08, 11:33 AM   #22
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[…] I recon steering like you describe isn't what most of us do at all. I lean the unicycle using my hips with the pedalling being all about drive.
Yep. It's all in the leaning!
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Old 2019-08-09, 12:34 PM   #23
Mikefule
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I'm late to the discussion, but:

Your posture looks about OK. You will ride more smoothly, and therefore faster if you can hold the front of your seat comfortably with one or both hands.

If you worry about going fast, that will not improve your speed. Take your mind off speed by concentrating on something else.

Ride up hills: it is easier to pedal smoothly against some resistance.

Ride down gentle slopes: it is easier to learn to spin fast when you are not also having to push hard.

Concentrate on an objective, like doing a lap of your local park, or pond, or a particular section of a favourite track "all in one". Become familiar with a route then ride it lots.

Then try two things:

1) Short bursts (10 seconds?) of riding as fast as you possibly can. This is because increasing the speed that counts as "100%" will also increase your comfortable cruising speed — call it 80% of maximum.

2) Timing yourself on a familiar loop, but without looking at the speed or time during the lap.

If your cranks are too long, your riding may be uneven and awkward. If your cranks are to short for you, you may be wary of going too fast in case you can't recover your balance when something goes wrong. The right length of crank for you will change as you gain in experience. Shorter is not always better.
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Old 2019-08-09, 08:35 PM   #24
aj1500
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikefule View Post
I'm late to the discussion, but:

Your posture looks about OK. You will ride more smoothly, and therefore faster if you can hold the front of your seat comfortably with one or both hands.

I do ride holding the seat with right hand, am getting better at using left but can't do both

If you worry about going fast, that will not improve your speed. Take your mind off speed by concentrating on something else.

I never think about the speed, other than the obvious issue of speeding up and slowing down rapidly at times

Ride up hills: it is easier to pedal smoothly against some resistance.

yep I have noticed this

Ride down gentle slopes: it is easier to learn to spin fast when you are not also having to push hard.

still struggle with this, sometimes I can cruise right along and other times I'm fighting the back of the pedals to keep control

Concentrate on an objective, like doing a lap of your local park, or pond, or a particular section of a favourite track "all in one". Become familiar with a route then ride it lots.

Then try two things:

1) Short bursts (10 seconds?) of riding as fast as you possibly can. This is because increasing the speed that counts as "100%" will also increase your comfortable cruising speed — call it 80% of maximum.

good idea, I'll work on that

2) Timing yourself on a familiar loop, but without looking at the speed or time during the lap.

do it, I use cycle meter and never review it until the ride is over

If your cranks are too long, your riding may be uneven and awkward. If your cranks are to short for you, you may be wary of going too fast in case you can't recover your balance when something goes wrong. The right length of crank for you will change as you gain in experience. Shorter is not always better.
I hope to get to ride with the new cranks this weekend, see if I can tell a difference. I know the main thing is practice practice practice
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Old 2019-08-10, 02:58 AM   #25
Canoeheadted
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I think stomping on the pedals to initiate turns is a learning habit. It does work but is abrupt and limits the turn to time with the downstroke.
This causes that nice snake like track and is usually done standing.
Or this is done to save a fall to the opposite side.

But I do think that weighting the pedals (no matter where they are) so you can force your centre of gravity to a more favourable position. (standing up)
Applying steady and relative force to the back pedal coming up too will cause your track to straighten up.

And then of course, once you learn to stay seated, pedal steady, and use both hands on the handlebars the steering seems to come from the handlebars (as ElpuebloUNIdo said) because most of the control is coming very precise body control.

My take on it.
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Old 2019-08-14, 07:26 PM   #26
aj1500
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today I built a handlebar and put it on my 29, it's just a straight bar coming off the seat post just under the seat. I still haven't got to ride on the new cranks yet, hopefully I can get some seat time in be fore the weekend is out
figured I would try to use a handlebar and see if I like it or if it helps me as I ride longer
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