Unicyclist Community

Go Back   Unicyclist Community > Unicycling Discussion > General Unicycling Discussions

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 2018-06-26, 01:08 PM   #1
ScaredOldKid
Unicyclist
 
ScaredOldKid's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 73
Free mount switch-up "worked"

Short story= I switch feet and it worked.
Long story= I've been riding for almost a year and still struggled free mounting. I learned to ride by holding onto a pole first (like almost everyone). I always placed my left foot on the pedal (6 o'clock) held pole then placed right foot on other pedal (12 o'clock). After a couple of months of learning to ride in general I felt it was time to learn free mounting. By the way at this point I've moved to a 27.5 wheel.
To free mount I would place left foot on at 3 o'clock and then mount up to catch the right pedal as close to 9 o'clock. This kinda worked about 1 in 5 times. The big problem was to often I ended up putting to much weight on that left foot and the uni would fly out from under me.
One day it occurred to me that my body was trained to put weight on my left foot from back in the countless days of pole mounting. I switch over to starting my free mount with right foot on first and got it the first time. Now it's working 8 out of 10 times. Hope this helps someone. Cheers
__________________
"Knowledge is gained right after you needed it the most"
ScaredOldKid is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2018-06-28, 02:41 AM   #2
johnfoss
North Shore ridin'
 
johnfoss's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: El Dorado Hills, CA
Age: 56
Posts: 16,787
Something else to think about in terms of that. Instead of thinking about how much "weight" to put on the pedal, turn it around. Just keep your foot in that position relative to the seat.

Seems ridiculous at first, but really that's all you need to do. Don't push down, don't let up, just hold your foot in place. With a little practice, this becomes very easy, and keeps your mounts from reverting to the kind where one foot is at the bottom and you're trying to ride away from the dead spot.
__________________
John Foss
www.unicycling.com

"The miracle is this: the more we share, the more we have." -- Leonard Nimoy
johnfoss is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2018-06-28, 11:27 AM   #3
Vogelfrei80
Beginner
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: Italy
Posts: 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnfoss View Post
Something else to think about in terms of that. Instead of thinking about how much "weight" to put on the pedal, turn it around. Just keep your foot in that position relative to the seat.

Seems ridiculous at first, but really that's all you need to do. Don't push down, don't let up, just hold your foot in place. With a little practice, this becomes very easy, and keeps your mounts from reverting to the kind where one foot is at the bottom and you're trying to ride away from the dead spot.
I cannot really understand what "turn it around" means.

Can you explain with a short vid? I usually start making an half idle before leaving or make a jump to start weighting on both pedals in the same time.
Vogelfrei80 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2018-06-28, 12:32 PM   #4
Mikefule
Bridge of Otherwhere: on Kindle
 
Mikefule's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Long Bennington, Lincolnshire, England.
Posts: 7,025
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vogelfrei80 View Post
I cannot really understand what "turn it around" means.
"Turn it around" in this context does not refer to physically turning something round. It means "look at the problem from the other direction".

Instead of doing X to achieve Y, concentrate on Y and X will happen naturally — that sort of thing.

So, instead of concentrating on how much weight to put on your foot in order to ride better, turn the idea around and just try to keep the foot int he right position and the weighting will sort itself out.

The solution to most riding problems is to ride more. It takes a while to get used to shorter cranks. Until you're used to them, they can occupy so much of your attention that you ride worse than you were doing with the long ones. Every rider has an ideal crank length for their level of experience, their style of riding, and so on. Chasing after the idea of short cranks as an end in itself is fun, but will not make you a better rider, but becoming a better rider will make you get more out of short cranks.
__________________
https://youtu.be/KspNux3B_XE
Talking about a sometimes overlooked but fundamental difference between science and religion.
Mikefule is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2018-06-28, 08:46 PM   #5
Vogelfrei80
Beginner
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: Italy
Posts: 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikefule View Post
"Turn it around" in this context does not refer to physically turning something round. It means "look at the problem from the other direction".

Instead of doing X to achieve Y, concentrate on Y and X will happen naturally — that sort of thing.

So, instead of concentrating on how much weight to put on your foot in order to ride better, turn the idea around and just try to keep the foot int he right position and the weighting will sort itself out.

The solution to most riding problems is to ride more. It takes a while to get used to shorter cranks. Until you're used to them, they can occupy so much of your attention that you ride worse than you were doing with the long ones. Every rider has an ideal crank length for their level of experience, their style of riding, and so on. Chasing after the idea of short cranks as an end in itself is fun, but will not make you a better rider, but becoming a better rider will make you get more out of short cranks.
Ok, now I agree with you. Everithing seems less difficult just practicing than focusing on it too much
Vogelfrei80 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2018-07-01, 10:05 AM   #6
fetzenschorsch
Peace on Earth Unicycle Club
 
fetzenschorsch's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: Nordeifel/Germany
Age: 56
Posts: 41
Think different

Quote:
Originally Posted by johnfoss View Post
Instead of thinking about how much "weight" to put on the pedal, turn it around. Just keep your foot in that position relative to the seat.
Thanks John your advice works well.

@vogelfrei I also tend to focus to much on a problem instead of letting it solve by itself.
__________________
My favourite music: Ska
My favourite bbq: Jerk Chicken
My favourite unicyclist: Peter Tosh

I own a Kris Holm, an Impact and a Mad4One T-Shirt

"You can't start a fire without a spark"
- Bruce Springsteen -

Last edited by fetzenschorsch; 2018-07-01 at 10:19 AM. Reason: mispelling
fetzenschorsch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2018-07-01, 09:07 PM   #7
ScaredOldKid
Unicyclist
 
ScaredOldKid's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 73
I like your advice of not thinking about it from a weight problem.
Sometimes when I focus too much on not putting weight on that foot I end up putting weight on it. Cheers!
__________________
"Knowledge is gained right after you needed it the most"
ScaredOldKid is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
27.5", free, free mounting, mount, switchup, worked


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
[For Sale: USA] 24" x 2.5" Hookworm - pick up near Harrisburg, PA Biggestbtc Trading Post 4 2016-10-27 06:09 PM
How much PSI can a 36" "TA" tire hold up? one4all General Unicycling Discussions 5 2013-08-01 01:31 PM
Is a 20" (versus a 24") better for learning to idle, free-mount, and ride backwards? Luderart General Unicycling Discussions 11 2010-05-16 01:38 PM
"Switch" tricks: the future of street? skate4flip General Unicycling Discussions 29 2006-04-29 09:49 PM


All times are GMT. The time now is 10:48 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © 2001-2016 Gilby
Page generated in 0.07361 seconds with 12 queries