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Old 2012-07-04, 04:59 PM   #1246
eyal
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Ilan Kedan: mountain unicyclist, cardiologist

Just came across this interview with Ilan Kedan of Los Angeles.

http://www.discoveriesmagazine.org/q...Q1iLw.facebook

I love this part:
Q. What’s more challenging: riding a unicycle or performing a pericardiocentesis (draining fluid from around the heart with a needle)?

A. They are both challenging in different ways, but I’d say, in terms of physical challenge, unicycling wins. Riding a unicycle is physically much harder than any cardiology procedure I’ve ever had to perform. You are using your entire body to maneuver a tiny wheel over a surface that can change suddenly and dramatically. To take a unicycle uphill and average nine miles an hour for 10 to 15 miles—that’s a great workout!
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Old 2012-07-09, 09:09 AM   #1247
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Text of above

A link is fine but usually expires in time. That's why posters are encouraged to copy and past the text in their post here. One could copy pictures as well if there are any. (There was a nice one with this article, linking cardiology and unicycling in a creative way.)

Q+A with Ilan Kedan, MD, cardiologist, extreme unicyclist

Q&A
Leave a comment »
Summer 2012


Q. Why cardiology?

A. Cardiology makes the most sense to me. There’s a strong mechanical angle to it—it focuses on an organ that functions a lot like a pump, with its own intricate plumbing and wiring. It’s also a very dynamic specialty: We can diagnose problems in any area of the heart and there’s usually a known treatment option.

Q. What is your favorite part of the job?

A. Hearing my patients’ stories, and understanding their perspective. Heart problems can develop abruptly or creep up over time, so to make the right diagnosis, it’s important to understand when the patient’s version of “normal” changed.

Q. You go to an extreme to keep your heart healthy—how did you discover unicycling?

A. I have always been an exercise enthusiast. I used to run 30 miles a week, but I had to stop because of injuries. So, four years ago, I started riding a unicycle. Bicycles are expensive and they don’t fit in your car. A unicycle seemed like a good challenge! On a unicycle, you have to train your brain and muscles to become more aware of a constantly changing center of gravity.

Q. Are there ways in which being a cardiologist is similar to being a unicyclist?

A. They both give me mental focus and toughness. If you’re about to ride down a very steep, technical, rocky stretch of trail, you can’t be thinking about anything else. The same goes for treating a patient—it requires your complete attention. Both take a lot of practice, commitment, and training.

Q. What’s more challenging: riding a unicycle or performing a pericardiocentesis (draining fluid from around the heart with a needle)?

A. They are both challenging in different ways, but I’d say, in terms of physical challenge, unicycling wins. Riding a unicycle is physically much harder than any cardiology procedure I’ve ever had to perform. You are using your entire body to maneuver a tiny wheel over a surface that can change suddenly and dramatically. To take a unicycle uphill and average nine miles an hour for 10 to 15 miles—that’s a great workout!
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Old 2012-07-10, 03:08 PM   #1248
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Short photo write-up in the Helena Independent Record, Helena, Montana, USA:
http://helenair.com/news/local/featu...9bb2963f4.html

Feature Photo: Unicycling the Continental Divide Trail
StoryDiscussionFeature Photo: Unicycling the Continental Divide Trail
Eliza Wiley Independent Record helenair.com | Posted: Tuesday, July 10, 2012 12:00 am

As the heat of the day began to rise, Benjamin Siress treated himself to a huckleberry smoothie as he entered the Helena city limits Monday morning.

"I try to hit 50 miles per day," said Siress of his journey along the Continental Divide Trail on a unicycle. "The most I've hit has been 66, but there was a bit of downhill."

On Friday night Siress awoke to a bear within 10 feet of his primitive camp spot on Clearwater Lake. "I shot up at 4 a.m. which scared the bear up a tree. It stayed in the tree hissing at me for a while then jumped down and ran away," said Siress.

Siress anticipates arriving in Mexico around Sept. 1.
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Old 2012-07-10, 03:25 PM   #1249
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Thanks for posting that one. Earlier today I saw a picture of Ben on Gen's blog (he's also riding the Divide route) and was wondering who he was.
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Old 2012-07-10, 03:53 PM   #1250
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Ugh, this is torture, I'm sitting in an office and the Continental Divide Trail is only about an hour's drive away. I really need to start picking off at least some sections of it for weekend adventures.
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Old 2012-07-17, 03:28 AM   #1251
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Journal, your community magazine: Taking the STP challenge

Kevin Williams - Straightarrow
in Monthly Features

Taking the STP challenge: The Seattle to Portland Bicycle Classic attracts cyclists of all abilities

From hard-core athletes to recreational enthusiasts, 10,000 cyclists will attempt to complete the 202-mile annual Seattle to Portland Bicycle Classic July 14 and 15. Along the way, they will have plenty of people cheering them on, including their fellow riders.
One-day wonders
The Seattle to Portland Bicycle Classic (STP), organized by the Cascade Bicycle Club, is one of the 10 longest recreational rides in the nation.
But for one year it was a race. There were 59 participants in the inaugural ride in 1979, and the winner was Jerry Baker. Then the club decided to take the competitive element out and make it a fun event.
Baker is the only person to ride in the STP every year. At age 70, he still bikes about 150 miles a week and completes the ride to Portland in one day, but he fulfilled his need for speed the year he raced. Since then, it’s been more about socializing than proving anything.
“You just ride along and have a good time. I’m real good at talking,” Baker said.
While Baker is happy to ride for 15 hours to finish the STP, others like to go faster by drafting. Drafting is a technique of biking closely behind another person to break the force of the wind and increase your speed up to 30 percent.
“When you draft, you follow pretty close, and if the person in front of you slows down or there is a bump in the road it’s pretty easy for them to knock you down. There is more likely to be an accident, especially as you get more tired,” Baker said. “It’s a very diverse group riding the STP. Some people know what they’re doing and some people don’t. I have to be cautious because you don’t repair as fast when you’re 70 as you do when you’re 30 or 40.”
Twenty-something athletes like John Pollard insist that drafting is essential to completing the STP. “In a perfect world, you would be in a pace line (a long line of riders who are drafting) the entire time,” he said. “The last time I did the STP, I spent the first 100 miles in a pace line. Then, as the race progressed, I would hang out with a group for a while and then fall off and ride on my own, and then catch up with another group and ride with them.”
Pollard is among the group of one-day riders who are in such good physical condition that they don’t train especially hard for the STP. He plays hockey on a team, lifts weights and does yoga, but cycling fits into a recreational and social category in his life. In fact, when he rode the STP for the first time three years ago, he was surprised that it wasn’t more physically challenging. Having ridden the High Pass Challenge, in which cyclists climb over 7,500 feet in elevation while riding more than 114 miles, the 26-year-old said the hardest part about the STP was that his bottom was sore at the end.
Though most people are impressed when they hear that he is riding the STP in one day, Pollard said there are many who do it without training hard.
Two-day riders
Ninety percent of the participants in the STP ride it in two days. With so many people at the starting line, organizers send riders off in 10-minute intervals. One-day riders start from 4:45 a.m. to 5:15 a.m. and two-day riders from 5:15 a.m. to 7:30 a.m. Still, it is important to be cautious when surrounded by so many people on bicycles.
“I would rather ride all by myself or in a small group, but it’s kind of neat to have all those people around because there is a lot of energy. You can’t just open up and go fast, but as the day goes on everyone kind of spreads out a little and you can pass people,” said Lisa Felber, a 44-year-old nurse and mother of two who will ride the STP for the third time this year.
It was her friend Lorene Jansson who initially convinced Felber to ride the STP. Jansson signed up in 2009 to motivate herself to train.
“As I’m getting older, I’m finding that it takes more exercise to even maintain my desired level of fitness,” the 54-year-old mother of two said. “I just love being outdoors, and found in training for the STP that I love bike riding — you’re outdoors, you’re getting a good workout and you’re with friends so you chat about things. It’s just a great way to get exercise.”
Prior to training, Jansson thought 14 miles was a long way to ride her bicycle.
“A lot of it ends up being a mental thing. If you’re preparing for 19 miles mentally, you can do it. But if you have it in your mind that 19 miles is a long way, you’re going to poop out at mile 15,” she said.
With a third friend completing their training team, the women went on 25-mile rides for several months before bumping up the distance to 32 miles. “On Memorial Day we did a ride on Whidbey Island that was 50 miles of hills and it just about did us in,” Jansson said.
As the STP approached, the threesome rode 80 miles in one day. Then they did two back-to-back rides, peddling 70 miles one day and another 70 the next.
They completed the STP in two 12-hour days. “We just wanted to make it through,” Jansson said. “They were starting to tear everything down and it was pouring down rain, but we were so glad we had made it.”
In 2010, Jansson’s group completed the STP in two nine-hour days by drafting and taking fewer breaks.
“The second year, we finished midway with the pack of people and there was quite a festive atmosphere,” she said. “Both years were great, with just having the sense of accomplishment and doing it successfully.”
After training and adjusting her bicycle to make it more comfortable, Felber found the STP to be easier than she expected. “Two hundred miles seemed absolutely unbelievable, but you take all day to ride the first half of it and it was actually quite nice,” she said. “And we had trained for it, so we didn’t get super tired.”
It’s not about coming in first; it’s about finishing the ride, according to Jansson. “Just take it steady and at the level that you can do. Have a sense that this is fun, it is not a race. Just enjoy it,” she said.
Riding on one wheel
Kevin Williams was completing radiation treatment for a cancerous tumor in his left knee when he heard about a friend and his wife who were training for the 2005 STP.
“I couldn’t believe that his wife could ride that far,” Williams said. “She had heard about a guy finishing on a unicycle and she said, ‘If a guy can ride the STP on a unicycle, I can ride it on a bike.’”
Making the trek on a bike did not appeal to Williams, but riding a unicycle more than 200 miles was another story. He had delivered papers as a boy while riding one, and he was intrigued. After reading an article by Bruce Dawson, a unicyclist who completed the STP, he was determined to do it.
Williams was wiped out from radiation, and his leg was swollen from treatment and would remain that way for years. Still, he couldn’t let go of the idea of riding in the STP.
“I really felt like I had something to prove, that I wasn’t done,” Williams said. “I felt so abbreviated in so many ways.”
In 2009, he rode 150 miles of the STP before stopping. “It’s hard as hell to ride a unicycle 100 miles a day,” he said. “You can never coast.”
Though he did not complete the ride, Williams did not feel like he had failed. One benefit he enjoyed after training so hard was that the inflammation in his knee decreased and it returned to normal size, never to swell like that again.
“When you start doing that level of exercise, you open things up and they start working better,” he said.
Williams became one of five people to complete the ride to Portland on a unicycle in 2010 and 2011, and he is training again for this year.
“I get so excited thinking about the challenge of it, and the people on the ride make it that much more fun,” he said. “Everybody passes me on the first day, even the slowest bicyclist with the latest start. But I’m consistent and I will make it if I show up prepared.”
Finishing strong
One group that exemplifies the spirit of camaraderie in the STP ride is the team of students and mentors from the Major Taylor Project.
Four years ago, five community leaders including former King County Executive Ron Simms started the Major Taylor Project with the goal of getting diverse youth from King County involved in cycling. Under the direction of Ed Ewing at the Cascade Bicycle Club, the group hosts after-school clubs in SeaTac, White Center, West Seattle, Rainier Valley and Burien.
Each club has a fleet of new bicycles for members to use in a 12-week riding program offered each spring. Students who complete the program are given the opportunity the following fall to complete a six-week program called “Earn a Bike.” After hands-on training in bike repair and maintenance, the teens get to keep the bike they work on during the program.
Though not a requirement, students in the Major Taylor Project are eligible to ride in the STP with full sponsorship. Ewing expects between 40 and 50 teens will ride alongside adult volunteers this year.
“It is an important component of the program to surround the student with positive role models, because if a student sees an adult doing the activity it becomes cool, and we also want them to be safe and well taken care of,” Ewing said.
Riding with teens in the STP made Ewing realize how much he takes for granted. Last year, he rode with two students who have never been outside of King County.
“They were trying to get their heads around the idea of crossing the Longview Bridge into Oregon, and it really dawned on me how much [the program] was expanding the students’ world and impacting them,” Ewing said. “In Seattle, we have such an educated base and community of corporate headquarters, and it’s a very livable, amazing city. But not all of the opportunities reach all communities. I didn’t know the extent of that until I developed the program and started working with the students and learning more about them and their families and backgrounds.”
Ewing estimates that 90 percent or more of the teens involved in the Major Taylor Project have never ridden more than three to five miles on a bike.
“We share the possibility of doing the ride in March and get a lot of comments like, ‘How could I do that?’ Then we share that 10,000 people do it every year and it’s just like anything in life, if you set goals and go for it you can achieve it,” he said. “Then to see them cross the [STP] finish line four months later is remarkable.”
Participants in the Major Taylor Project are divided into three groups for the STP: fast, medium and fun. “The only goals we have are that the students are safe and that they have fun,” Ewing said, adding that the kids get a lot of positive feedback from other cyclists on the route.
But the best support comes from each other. No matter how fast or slow a member rides, the team crosses the finish line together. The tradition began the first year when some of the boys got to Portland two hours ahead of everyone else, and one of them wanted to wait for everybody else.
“Last year, we had five students arrive three-and-a-half hours ahead of the rest, and they waited in a park with two adult volunteers until we could all finish the ride together,” Ewing said. “We will never turn down a student to ride, and never make it a failure if they have to get in the van and ride for 20 or 30 miles. If any student wants to try it, we absolutely say yes.”
Volunteers are posted all along the STP route to make sure everyone who wants to can say “yes” to the ride.
For more information, visit www.cascade.org.
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Old 2012-08-04, 06:55 AM   #1252
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Here's an article I wrote for Outside Magazine's website - hope you enjoy:
http://www.outsideonline.com/outdoor...nicycling.html

THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF MOUNTAIN UNICYCLING
Why haven't you tried it yet? Sure, it looks awfully hard and it can be difficult to grasp the basics, but once you master riding on one wheel, whole new experiences will open up to you.

By: KRIS HOLM
____
Last summer, a friend and I hiked our cycles into the Coast Mountains north of Vancouver, British Columbia, to a ridge overlooking the coastal town of Britannia Beach. Our objective was to ride a notoriously steep trail called Disneyland that descends almost 5,000 feet from the alpine to the ocean. His choice of ride: two wheels. And mine: just one.

After a few hours of ascending through steep bush and broken rock steps, we finally emerged into the alpine and dropped our collective three wheels onto a trail descending rock chutes and rooty singletrack. At the end of Disneyland, it was another first unicycle descent, in a sport that's wide open to firsts just about anywhere you care to look.

I've always been fascinated by simplicity. Stripping gear to its essentials seems to strip away the stuff that otherwise insulates you from what you're trying to experience. My original interest stemmed from am obsession with rock climbing in the '90s, with its ethic of minimalism and freedom to define your own adventure. But even before I'd become obsessed with climbing, an encounter with a unicycling street performer in 1986 inspired me to learn a sport that, 25 years later, has grown to shape my life.

Mountain unicycling, or muni, involves riding a unicycle over the same trails as mountain bikes, from easy gravel paths and dirt roads to technical climbs and steep descents. Unicycle trials riding, like bike trials, involves riding over urban and natural obstacles. After dwelling in near total obscurity throughout the 1980s and '90s, in the past decade thousands of mountain and trials unicyclists have discovered that you can ride the same terrain as bikers, from easy ground to terrain that would be tough for even the experts on two wheels.

At the same time, public awareness of mountain unicycling has grown somewhat, but not nearly to the point where the sport is well-understood. After our Disneyland descent, my friend and I returned to the city and I grabbed a coffee, sipping while unicycling along a flat sidewalk, my dog beside me on leash. Predictably, this drew stares, applause, and even a question: Can you ride downhill?

This lack of awareness about unicycling is partly the fault of the sport itself. It's tough to learn, and it takes persistence to ride that first few meters. I've lost count of the number of people who have tried it only once, and then told me it is impossible. If you've only seen videos, you would be forgiven for thinking that mountain unicycling is just about big drops and gnarly descents. But that would be like reducing the entirety of skiing to big mountain films, or thinking that there is nothing to biking beyond freeride action videos. And if you think riding on one wheel sounds unlikely, try explaining bicycling to a non-rider, or justifying pedaling uphill to a motor biker. The unlikeliness has to do with its rarity; otherwise it's not that different.

It turns out, in fact, that offroad unicycling isn't very limited at all. A casual ride on an easy path? Try it out. There are few better ways to de-stress and get a core body workout. Forty kilometers of singletrack? Go for it. You'll be tired by the end, but isn't that part of the point? And take your dog. You'll travel at a more compatible pace than when on a bike and, if you have to, riding with a leash is no hardship with free hands. Bored with the same old mountain bike loop? A single wheel will let you re-experience it in a totally different way. It's an uncommon sport that is perhaps the most underestimated in all of cycling.

Yet a sticking point remains: it looks awfully hard. So how do you get started? What is missing is a manual, something that kick-starts the experience so that riders see the potential from the outset without having to start from scratch. A few years ago, I started putting my experiences on paper, and the result is The Essential Guide to Mountain and Trials Unicycling. It's partly a guidebook and partly a showcase of what mountain and trials riders around the world already know: that these sports open up a whole new perspective on riding that goes far beyond what some people might imagine.
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Old 2012-08-10, 09:54 PM   #1253
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The Capital Times is reporting that a unicyclist was allegedly selling marijuana in downtown Madison Wisconsin. Uncool dude. We are trying to take unicycling mainstream. People already look at us sideways. We don't need them thinking that all unicyclists are pot heads.

Don't get me wrong, I don't have a huge problem with consumption in the privacy of your own home but distribution to the general public (people that you don't know who are probably going to turn you in to the police) will definitely get you in trouble. I hope you've got a good lawyer. I personally feel that all drugs should be legal and taxed heavily like alcohol and cigarettes. But, until that happens, you'd better watch your step or at least choose a less conspicuous vehicle from which to make your transactions. Had they told the police, a guy in a silver Toyota was selling weed, then you might have got away with it. But, a unicycle is pretty easy to pick out of a crowd. Good luck with the judicial system. You are in our thoughts and prayers.
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Old 2012-08-30, 06:12 PM   #1254
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Just happened across this one, from The Daily Iowan:


World-class unicyclist, UI student making her mark on campus

BY STACEY MURRAY | AUGUST 30, 2012 6:30 AM


One wheel? No problem.

University of Iowa freshman Patricia Wilton is an internationally renowned unicyclist, and she recently competed at the international level in northern Italy. She came in fifth place for cross-country mountain unicycling in the 17- to 18-year-old female division.

“Unicyling is such a unique talent,” said the elementary-education major. “Balance and persistence are the main parts. You’re going to fall; the only way to improve is to get back up again.”

Wilton began unicycling at the age of 10 when she received a unicycle as a shared gift with her brother. She learned in a few hours, and she contends that anyone could learn how to ride in just 20 hours of work.

“I learned in a week; they say it’s 24 hours, but when you’re younger, it’s much easier,” said the 18-year-old.

Competitively racing in the mountains isn’t her only skill in the unicycling world.

In 2011, she earned second place at a national competition in the long distance overall, which accumulates the best overall points earned in the 10K, marathon, and timed trial.

Wilton has participated in several types of unicycling competitions. She has also participated in artistic unicycling, which resembles figure skating with the use of routines, music, and costume.

She has earned second place in the peers’ artistic category of artistic cycling, performing a routine with her brother Scott Wilton. He is also highly skilled — he is a unicycle three-time world champion.

Patricia Wilton said artistic competitions are the most time-consuming and require the most effort. Half of the performance score is based on the technique, and the other half is derived from the performance.

Now, she trains at the Madison Unicyclists Club in Madison, Wis., where her mother Ann O’Brien is the president.

Though she doesn’t have a coach, she uses her peers and unicycling events to learn new techniques and tricks. Other unicyclists use Internet resources, including YouTube, to attain new skills.

While in high school, Wilton was a dancer, cross-country runner and gymnast, contributing to the endurance aspect of her training and her leadership skills, she said.

“She’s a natural leader, teacher and coach,” O’Brien said.

Since moving to Iowa City, Wilton said, she has missed helping and teaching the younger and less experienced cyclists.

“I mainly miss watching the younger kids and helping them get skills. I usually help make their routines for nationals,” she said. “It’s fun for me to see them win medals because unicycling is such a unique talent.”

Unicycling, a sport that isn’t recognized at the Olympic level, differs from nearly any sport for two reasons, father Jeff Wilton said.

“There’s no money in it — maybe two people in the world have sponsors for a little money,” he said. “And it’s hard to take yourself too seriously on a unicycle. You’re one step away from falling off.”

For him, unicycling is a family affair.

“Pretty much all of our family vacations since 2007 have all been unicycling events,” Jeff Wilton said.

These family vacations have taken Patricia Wilton and her family all over the world, including New Zealand, Nova Scotia, Denmark, Sweden, and most recently, Italy.

Patricia Wilton attributes much of her success to her parents’ support, including her mother’s involvement in leading her club.

“She does so much on the administrative side,” Wilton said. “Without her, we wouldn’t have traveled to so many places.”

With medals, experiences, and passport stamps under her belt, Patricia Wilton said the people she’s met have been her greatest prize.

“The best part is the community and how everybody is already unique because they’ve chose to unicycle,” she said.
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Old 2012-08-30, 09:23 PM   #1255
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An article about my ride down Mt. Vesuvius

I didn't know this thread was here. Seems like a good place to share this article, which I'm pretty excited about. After UNICON, I toured around Italy. In Naples, I hired a mountain bike guide to take me on a muni ride on Mt. Vesuvius. This is the volcano mountain whose eruption buried Pompeii and Herculaneum in 79 AD, among others.

The article is in Italian, but it was super exciting to see.

http://www.ilmattino.it/articolo.php...745&sez=ESTATE

----------paste from article---------

La sfida del californiano equilibrista,
sul Vesuvio in sella alla monoruota

di Nello Fontanella
«Aisséra/ Nanninè/ mme ne sagliette/ tu saje addó/tu saje addó…..». Quando nel 1880 scrisse «Funiculì, funiculà», il giornalista Luigi Turco magnificò la prima funicolare del Vesuvio che permetteva di salire senza fatica sulla vetta del vulcano per ammirare lo straordinario panorama.

Ma mai avrebbe immaginato che a distanza di oltre 130 anni, un californiano ci avrebbe provato in bici. O per meglio dire, con il monociclo. Insomma quei trabiccoli che usano i giocolieri nei circhi. Una sola ruota. E la sella. Nicholas Brazzi, 34enne californiano della città di Ventura ce l’ha fatta. In sella alla sua ruota, ieri mattina ha percorso i sentieri più panoramici per l’ascesa al gran cono del Vesuvio: la strada Matrone e riserva Tirone.

Da Boscotrecase fino alle falde più altre del vulcano. Dodici chilometri e 7 ore per raggiungere quota 1270. Il cono del Vesuvio in pratica, ed esclamare «beautiful». Da mozzafiato la vista che spazia verso valle sulla Piana Campana e sulla Riserva Tirone. Sulle bocche laviche del 1906 e sulle creste del Monte Somma con la punta Nasone opposta ai Cagnoli. Uno slargo panoramico sulla penisola sorrentina e il golfo di Napoli. Nicholas è stato accompagnato nella sua avventura da Claudio Caccavale, membro dello staff sportivo del team Veloce, l'azienda di cicloturismo di Gennaro de Concilio classificata dalla guida internazionale Lonely Planet come la prima cosa da fare in Europa in ambito turistico.

In Italia per assistere ai campionati mondiali di monociclo, terminati il 31 luglio a Bressanone, Brazzi ha chiesto proprio a De Concilio di «voler scalare il Vesuvio in monociclo». Detto e accontentato. Ieri la grande impresa. Del resto Gennaro De Concilio aveva già portato gli australiani nel nolano; gli americani in costiera e i francesi nel beneventano sulle strade del vino.

Tutti rigorosamente in bici. Ha poi facilitato l’incontro tra De Magistris e il management del giro d’Italia per la partenza l’anno prossimo dal lungomare di via Caracciolo.

Adesso si propone di realizzare nuove escursioni dal centro storico verso la Baia Flegrea, oltre a quelle prettamente sportive che saranno proposte proprio durante il periodo di lancio del giro d'Italia. Ma oggi è toccato a Nicholas Brazzi. E oggi il californiano sarà a Capri, in piazzetta. In monociclo? Forse.
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Old 2012-08-30, 09:30 PM   #1256
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Cool - great to hear that your ride went well!
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Old 2012-08-31, 12:08 AM   #1257
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Originally Posted by nbrazzi View Post
I didn't know this thread was here. Seems like a good place to share this article, which I'm pretty excited about. After UNICON, I toured around Italy. In Naples, I hired a mountain bike guide to take me on a muni ride on Mt. Vesuvius. This is the volcano mountain whose eruption buried Pompeii and Herculaneum in 79 AD, among others.
Nick Brazzi still rides. Good to hear from you again.
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Old 2012-08-31, 03:06 AM   #1258
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Nick Brazzi still rides. Good to hear from you again.
I wax and wane like the moon. And it didn't help that I moved away from the awesome Northern California community. But, UNICON has me energized again, as UNICON tends to do.
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Old 2012-10-08, 03:30 AM   #1259
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I dont want to steal Jamey's thunder but saw this in the paper and it was too good not to post here.

Congratulations!

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/new...-1226489496849

------------------------------------------------------------


WHEN the father of the bride is a concert and circus promoter it's just not a wedding until the groom makes his way down the aisle on a unicycle.

So it went when actress Gigi Edgley, daughter of Michael Edgley, married her long-time love Jamey Mossengren in an "enchanted evening" themed ceremony in Hawaii.

"I never imagined how incredible it would be - I could barely breathe, it was so exciting," the Tricky Business star tells the upcoming issue of Woman's Day, on sale from Monday.

"We had a magical theme. Our flower girls were wearing angel wings."

Clad in a Rhonda Hemmingway gown, the 34-year-old and her groom capped off the waterside nuptials with a reception befitting its location on the Hawaiian island of Maui.
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Old 2012-10-08, 08:25 AM   #1260
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rawcyclist View Post
I dont want to steal Jamey's thunder but saw this in the paper and it was too good not to post here.

Congratulations!

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/new...-1226489496849

------------------------------------------------------------


WHEN the father of the bride is a concert and circus promoter it's just not a wedding until the groom makes his way down the aisle on a unicycle.

So it went when actress Gigi Edgley, daughter of Michael Edgley, married her long-time love Jamey Mossengren in an "enchanted evening" themed ceremony in Hawaii.

"I never imagined how incredible it would be - I could barely breathe, it was so exciting," the Tricky Business star tells the upcoming issue of Woman's Day, on sale from Monday.

"We had a magical theme. Our flower girls were wearing angel wings."

Clad in a Rhonda Hemmingway gown, the 34-year-old and her groom capped off the waterside nuptials with a reception befitting its location on the Hawaiian island of Maui.
You beat me to it! I was just about to post it but lucky I did a search first. The search function does work!

Anyone in Australia can read more about it and see more photos by picking up a copy of Woman's Day that just came out today. Here is a photo from it:
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