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Old 2018-08-29, 12:54 PM   #61
ruari
 
 
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Well that is the good news. The bad news is that I cycled it into work this morning and, again I could hear a noise. Not as loud and not quite the same. This time I was really convinced it was spokes so I dropped into a local bike shop (where one of the guys is kinda known to me, via mutal friends) and he confirmed that that several spokes were loose. I thought i checked well before but hey… shows what i know.

I suspect that before the broken bearings accentuated the problem. So anyway, I have decided I'll hand the uni over them to fix it up, cause I clearly don't know what I am doing.
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Old 2018-08-30, 06:20 PM   #62
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Well they took it and gave it back to me within one day. Sorted out the spokes while truing the wheel (which was apparently slightly off). I think they had to get creative with regards to truing it because their stand was not big enough. Anyway, it looks like they worked it out because I cycled it home after work and no noise, bar the normal tyre roar from that big nightrider. Very satisfying!

Last edited by ruari; 2018-08-30 at 06:21 PM. Reason: removed redundant quote
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Old 2018-08-30, 06:43 PM   #63
Canoeheadted
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Get yourself a Park Tool spoke tension meter along with 4 or 5 spokes for spares.
Well worth it.

Then you can keep an eye on your spoke tensions or replace them when needed.
So easy to check after every so many rides or whenever you feel something just isn't right.

You've got everything else... right?

De-mystify it and buy it.
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Old 2018-08-30, 06:58 PM   #64
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Yeah, I probably should but for now I am just focussing on riding again.

One thing I did notice, riding the 36"er again after having spent the last few weeks commuting on a 26" with 102mm cranks is that the 150mm cranks felt absurdly big. I felt like I was doing massive, gangly movements.

I have a selection of cranks so I dropped them down to 140mm. This has helped but they still feel pretty long. Nonetheless, there are hills around here so I dare not drop down to 125mm or I reckon I might struggle getting up and my knees won't enjoy the rides down (no brakes).

Maybe it is just a question of getting used to it again.
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Old 2018-08-30, 07:35 PM   #65
Canoeheadted
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Nah!... That's just your body saying "no more!" to long cranks.
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Old 2018-08-31, 12:14 AM   #66
lightbulbjim
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Canoeheadted View Post
tension meter
Those tension meters are great for setting relative tension, but if you want to use them to measure absolute tension then they're a bit more tricky.

Since they rely on deflection for measurement you need to calibrate them off the wheel using a spare spoke. The calibration spoke will need to be exactly the same length, diameter and material as those in the wheel. Find a weight representing your target spoke tension, suspend it from the calibration spoke and record the tension meter deflection. Then bring up the spokes on the wheel up to that same deflection number and you'll know where you're at!

I bought one of those Park tension meters years ago too, thinking it would be really handy, but actually I've never used it since I realised that it's not so good for absolute tension without calibration, and it's pretty easy to set relative tension by feel and tone. If I was building a new wheel then I would probably use it to get the absolute tension in the ballpark (after calibrating on a spare spoke).

I'm of the "more is better" school of spoke tension ("crank it up until something breaks and then back it off half a turn" ). Both my current unis came with pretty slack and uneven spokes, and the 36er in particular used to creak and click while riding. I added a bunch of tension and evened them out ~3 years ago and they've been silent ever since.

Wow, that turned into a long post .
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Old 2018-08-31, 02:39 AM   #67
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If the spoke tension is correct you shouldn't need to re-tension the wheel. The shop should have it sorted out for you. If spokes are loosening from riding it is a sign that the tension is too low allowing the nipple to move when it is slack.


On the other hand:

The spokes on a 36er are really long, and difficult to tension correctly without a tension meter, so if you do decide to have a hand at it in the future I do recommend a tension gauge. The problem is that even when they have the correct tension they feel soft compared to other wheels due to the length.

I just saw lightbulbjims post. I agree with most of what he said. Still Ti spokes, and 36ers are pretty hard to get even tension without a spoke meter due to the overall "rubber band" quality that they have. Old rims used to deform under too much tension, so you could back off when you saw them "dimpling." Modern rims don't do that, they just look okay, and then crack at the spoke holes after you ride it for awhile. It's really not a good idea to overtension modern rims.

There is a bit more to calibration than was let on in the last post, but my hope is that if anyone is planning on tweaking the calibration of their tension meter they will read up on proper technique. It's a good idea to make a calibration rig with a spoke when you first get your meter so you have something to use in the future to check calibration, and to re-calibrate with if necessary.
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Last edited by jtrops; 2018-08-31 at 02:51 AM.
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Old 2018-08-31, 08:08 AM   #68
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As a side note, I think it is interesting that several people have mentioned having wheels not setup correctly when they receive them brand new. Is this a problem for all 36" unicycles (Kris Holm, QU-AX, the old Cokers) or just a UDC/Nimbus problem?

P.S. I know that Kris Holm 36" also use a Nimbus rim but since it has a KH 'Spirit' ISIS Hub, I presume the wheel is put together in a different factory, while I would expect that the UDC and Nimbus branded unicycles are all done in the same place. But of course, I am just guessing!

Last edited by ruari; 2018-08-31 at 08:09 AM.
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Old 2018-09-01, 02:17 AM   #69
jtrops
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ruari View Post
As a side note, I think it is interesting that several people have mentioned having wheels not setup correctly when they receive them brand new. Is this a problem for all 36" unicycles (Kris Holm, QU-AX, the old Cokers) or just a UDC/Nimbus problem?

P.S. I know that Kris Holm 36" also use a Nimbus rim but since it has a KH 'Spirit' ISIS Hub, I presume the wheel is put together in a different factory, while I would expect that the UDC and Nimbus branded unicycles are all done in the same place. But of course, I am just guessing!
Wheels that come on cycles tend to need work to get them as strong as they can be. For bikes it's because they are machine built, and the final tensioning is generally not high enough (unless they are finished by hand). I would guess that for unicycles it has more to do with the people building the wheels since I'm not aware of a wheel building machine that would accept a uni hub. Probably in the production line the workers just don't take the time to tension them properly.
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