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Old 2008-03-08, 10:06 PM   #1
oceansea
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Can learning on old, crappy unicycle to start be counterproductive?

im starting to wonder if this old 24" Loyd unicycle i bought a few weeks ago is maybe to clunky to try to learn on?.

I am expecting there to be a big learning curve, especially now at the beginning. But its seeming like this unicycle is just overly difficult to keep upright. I replaced the old tube after its valve stem broke while trying to inflate it.
New tube inflated to fairly firm. Maybe too much, so i released a little air. Dont know actual psi as no gauge.

But still seems like tracking even with one hands fingers touching a well is pretty off.?

How much will an old clunker like mine be useful or possibly counterproductive for learning to ride?
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Old 2008-03-08, 10:14 PM   #2
augustdreamt
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I think so. My first uni sucked and I couldn't do anything on it after a month of trying. I finally bought a Sun, and within an hour on the new uni, I was riding further and more steadily than I had in a month of practicing with the clunker.
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Old 2008-03-08, 10:32 PM   #3
semach.the.monkey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oceansea
im starting to wonder if this old 24" Loyd unicycle i bought a few weeks ago is maybe to clunky to try to learn on?
Unless it stops you from wanting to persevere, then No. You may not progress quite as fast as with a brand new Nimbus ISIS freestyle (or whatever your preference is), but you'll learn a lot of subliminal skills that will serve you well in the long run. It may not feel like you are improving in leaps and bounds now, but it's all being stored up.

Sooner or later, you will have to upgrade. And that's where you will really appreciate the difference. And where you'll see your stored knowledge shine through.

The trick is knowing when to upgrade

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Old 2008-03-08, 11:14 PM   #4
StephenH
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In what way is it clunky? How long and how much have you been practicing?

I can see if the pedals were loose, or the wheel was overly flexible ior if there was some obvious problem, it could hinder you. Otherwise, doesn't seem like it would make that much difference.

A 24" is supposed to be harder to learn on than a 20".

Looking back, I think I got my unicycle the day before Thanksgiving (US) and could ride to the end of the block, maybe 150 yards or so, by December 16. I just managed to ride around the block this last week.

I know there's people that have learned a whole lot faster. On the other hand, I've probably been working at it about 2 hours a week, so someone more motivated could put 20 weeks of my practice into one week of theirs if they were so inclined.
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Old 2008-03-08, 11:16 PM   #5
StephenH
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Oh yeah, on the tire pressure- on my 20x2.125" tire, I keep it at 45 psi, which is what it says on the tire. But it doesn't seem that different if it gets a little low, so I would doubt that was the problem.
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Old 2008-03-09, 05:01 AM   #6
SkierAlex
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Well my friend learnt on a home-made 24" from the 50s with 100mm cranks - shows it's possible but I'd definitely recommend learning on a decent 20"
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Old 2008-03-09, 07:00 AM   #7
Hugh
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I think it is more important that the unicycle be a good fit, than weather it is old or junky. It took me a long time to learn to ride and I think the main problem was the seat was too low for me. I would try for 10 or 15 minutes and it felt like I was doing lunges the whole time (I know most of that is not putting weight on seat - but the seat height amplified the problem). The other problem I had was not having an excellent resource like Unicyclist.com around when I was trying to learn.
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Old 2008-03-09, 02:13 PM   #8
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I only recently learnt on a cheapish 24" uni. It took around 12 - 15 hours (as a guess) then upgraded to a 26" before learning to freemount and ride with any real consistency but still not that great. If the uni is set up properly and nothing is bent I can't see why it would be any harder. I suggest keeping the tyre pressure up towards the high end. It may seem a little sensitive at first but you'll figure it out. Perhaps some new pedals with a little more grip might be a good idea too.

Also, some people take a shorter or longer time to learn to ride than others. Keep at it and you should be fine.
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Old 2008-03-09, 02:41 PM   #9
vanpaun
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where the hello did my detailed post go? oh well. i say wait a month thqn get somthing better. you payed 50 for that right? id say try to sell it for like 40-60.
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Old 2008-03-09, 03:43 PM   #10
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I tried to learn on a rather old 20" unicycle, perilously wobbling about trying to cross the little sports hall.

Five months later, I still never reached the other side.

Then I bought a brand new Nimbus X freestyle, and managed to cross the hall less than a week later.
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Old 2008-03-09, 03:48 PM   #11
Pdougherty
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A wheel is a wheel....Isn't it?
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Old 2008-03-09, 11:37 PM   #12
vanpaun
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kinda like a quax trials is a uni, and a torker lx is uni. Could you ride as well as on the quax, probably not
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Old 2008-03-10, 11:02 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pdougherty
A wheel is a wheel....Isn't it?
Yes...
  • attached to bearings which could either be super smooth turning, or rather resistive.
  • mounted with cranks that could be solid, or wobbly.
  • driven by pedals that could be grippy, or worn-out smooth that shoes slide off-of.
  • sitting inside a frame that could be rigid hard, or rickety from side to side.
  • with a seatpost above that could be adjustable, or rusted-in to a height not suitable for learning.
  • topped by a saddle that could be either super-comfy, or rigid hard, and may or may not be contoured.
Did I miss any?
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Old 2008-03-10, 11:26 AM   #14
Pdougherty
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gkmac
Yes...
  • attached to bearings which could either be super smooth turning, or rather resistive.
  • mounted with cranks that could be solid, or wobbly.
  • driven by pedals that could be grippy, or worn-out smooth that shoes slide off-of.
  • sitting inside a frame that could be rigid hard, or rickety from side to side.
  • with a seatpost above that could be adjustable, or rusted-in to a height not suitable for learning.
  • topped by a saddle that could be either super-comfy, or rigid hard, and may or may not be contoured.
Did I miss any?
No, I don't think so. but it's still just a wheel. Even if it is harder to learn to ride on at first.
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Old 2008-03-10, 05:48 PM   #15
cody
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I most definitively think that trying to learn on an old "clunky" uni can be harder. Me and my friend both tried to learn on a really badly made uni(summit or something) and when both of us got new unis our skill jumped up. It was really strange how much better we suddenly got when we got new unis.

Just my 1/2 cent,
Cody
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