Unicyclist Community

Go Back   Unicyclist Community > Unicycling Discussion > Unicycle Product Reviews

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Rating: Thread Rating: 41 votes, 5.00 average. Display Modes
Old 2009-05-28, 11:48 PM   #76
Sponge
Unicyclist
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 952
Weight wise we could cut a lot if we wanted to. We could use thinner tubing, take away the gusset reinforcements, and simplify it even further . That would bring down the weight a lot. Though, I'm not a fan of this 'weight race' that many cycling industries are going mad over these days, the weight at 520g is very light, and those of you with KH frames which weigh just under 600g will know that it's all light enough already! I'd rather not compromise the design, strength, or stiffness just to save a few measly grams.. though if you want to own a Triton like that, then go ahead.

It's been said a thousand times, and I'll say it again:
If you want to lose weight off your uni very cost effectively and in much more significant quantities than being picky with frames, then go for these:

-Pedals (titanium axles and magnesium bodies... even lighter than the plastic BMX pedals you see! Shocking...)
-Aluminium nipples
-Titanium spokes
-Monty Eagle Claw tyre (for those of you trials riders)
-Drilling out parts
-32h wheelbuilds
-Single bolt seatclamps
-Aluminium bolts (NOT titanium... because alu is lighter, and cheaper! Standard bolts are steel for the record)
-Cutting away foam
-CF bases
-Tensile cranks, for those of you that use KH Moments... you save A LOT of weight

-
Sponge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-05-28, 11:49 PM   #77
Sponge
Unicyclist
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 952
Few more pictorsz of Ken's










Last edited by Sponge; 2009-05-28 at 11:50 PM.
Sponge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-05-29, 12:07 AM   #78
Peripatet
Sometime one-wheeler
 
Peripatet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Hawaii!
Posts: 473
Send a message via Skype™ to Peripatet
God, that's beautiful.
Peripatet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-05-29, 01:03 AM   #79
unicyclerman
jarin erickson
 
unicyclerman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: west jordan UT
Age: 28
Posts: 402
Send a message via AIM to unicyclerman Send a message via MSN to unicyclerman
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sponge View Post
CF tubing on its own is very very flexy. Some people just don't want a flexy frame.
no it isnt haha. if you ever step foot on one of my frames you will see.
my stuff isnt just some ghetto rigged frame, it is my design engineered by a company that produce race car engines (http://www.sjenningsracing.com/home.htm) so they are made with the high level of precision, quality and strength that you would need in a 200+ mph race car. im glad to see another company pushing out into better designs and materials and you guys make some awesome stuff. i didnt mean any offense to you or your company through anything i have said i was simply taking note to another company with great parts.

now enough of this nonesense lets see some more pics of that GODLY Ti
__________________
WWW.EBUNICYCLES.COM top end uni parts.
street carbon frames now $400
unicyclerman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-05-29, 05:04 AM   #80
Jerrick
King of Carnies
 
Jerrick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Spokane, WA
Age: 30
Posts: 9,744
Send a message via MSN to Jerrick
Man, some buzz-killing in here.

Im going to be interested in which frame does take the lead in popularity. Sold more, and all that fun stuff.

Comparisons do matter.
__________________
Just bumming around MR~~~~~~~~~Team Forrest~~~~~~~~~Team Dirty Bird!~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Check out my Band.~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~!Quack!~~~~Team Spencer!~~~Member of the MRIS.
Want some advice? Do better.
~Jerrick
Jerrick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-05-29, 07:19 AM   #81
drumstuck
Unicyclist
 
drumstuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 223
What impressed me most when I got my hands on one of these frames was the welding. I've owned some high-end mtb frames (Kona Hei Hei, Litespeed Pisgah) and the welding was as neat as the Kona, which is the best I have seen. It is not just the added strength and longevity these welds give, they are a pleasure to look at every time you pick it up. It is one of the first things I would grab from my house if there was a fire, although it would probably be okay if I didn't
drumstuck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-05-29, 09:15 AM   #82
Sponge
Unicyclist
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 952
Quote:
Originally Posted by unicyclerman View Post
no it isnt haha. if you ever step foot on one of my frames you will see.
my stuff isnt just some ghetto rigged frame, it is my design engineered by a company that produce race car engines (http://www.sjenningsracing.com/home.htm) so they are made with the high level of precision, quality and strength that you would need in a 200+ mph race car. im glad to see another company pushing out into better designs and materials and you guys make some awesome stuff. i didnt mean any offense to you or your company through anything i have said i was simply taking note to another company with great parts.
Fair enough, well I am glad to see that someone else has taken the step to producing custom frames, hopefully yours should be at the standard you claim, so it should be decent enough.


But, can you really say CF tubing isn't flexy? No seriously. True yours might be a little more rigid than normal, but CF is inherently flexy, it's just a simple law of the material almost. CF as we know it in cycling is pretty much a plastic composite material with carbon weavings inside. Despite it being lighter than aluminium, it isn't stiffer than Aluminium, Steel, or Titanium alloys.

Your CF frames will probably be a bit lighter, since it's a combo of Plastic composite tubing and aluminium pieces, and if it's anything like the *rare* CF biketrials forks I've seen, then I'm excited too. What's your warranty service like by the way? Though in the short term it has served you well, I suspect that riders like Joe Hodges would somehow find a way to separate the CF tubing from the aluminium pieces as it's pressure bonded together with some special glue/resin, right? Meanwhile, is the neck carbon fibre too? In the long run I do suspect that it may separate or shear at the neck junction where it joins the alu crown.

Then again, prove me wrong.

Sponge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-05-29, 09:30 AM   #83
Jamieknox11
Rated-R Superstar
 
Jamieknox11's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: The Greatest Country in the WORLD
Age: 28
Posts: 76
OMG! These frames are all so amazingly sexweeee!

But when comparing the CF frames to Ti frames.. it's just logic:

Pros of Triton:

-Made by highly skilled professionals with decades of experience
-A frame from a brand with a great reputation in a range of cycle sports
-Hand-made one by one
-High quality tubing and materials
-High quality welding
-Rock solid titanium tubing
-Stiffest frame in the world currently, I have felt one!
-Strongest frame in the world currently
-Amazing lifetime warranty
-The most dent resistant frame currently
-Eternally reweldable
-Killer crown design, amazing concept!
-Very lightweight already at 520g!
-Could be made even lighter!
-Scratches don't show up easily compared to other frames
-Can be made to whatever custom spec you ask for!

Cons of Triton:

-Expensive at 550 USD base price!... but it's a bargain in reality!
-Takes time to make each frame and to ship



Pros of CF frame:


-Made by that high quality race car company
-Good warranty
-Sexy new concept inspired by gorgeous bike forks!!
-Potentially one of the lightest frames possible!

Cons of CF frame:

-Comparatively speaking, tubing is softer, flexier, and weaker than metal equivalent tubing
-Scratches will look obvious and ugly on CF
-Eventually the CF tubes will fracture after repeated abuse, especially smashing against walls during stacks
-Flexier than KH and Triton frames
-Still fairly expensive
-Tubes and aluminium parts are bonded/glued together instead of welded, which in the long run can separate after rigorous hardcore riding, and generally it *inevitably* holds true when I look at bike forks even...
-Bigger fatter aluminium crown that is more prone to knee bashing.


So in conclusion from my deductions, the CF is a better option if you want to go sickeningly light and want a different look than usual, but I think the Triton can become even lighter if it wanted to and still has an overall better design, material, strength, stiffness, and reliability. The quality standard of materials and manufacturing for both of these frames is probably equal though.

Last edited by Jamieknox11; 2009-05-29 at 09:30 AM.
Jamieknox11 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-05-29, 09:32 AM   #84
Jamieknox11
Rated-R Superstar
 
Jamieknox11's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: The Greatest Country in the WORLD
Age: 28
Posts: 76
FUSION time!:





Though it has been proven endless times that CF forks are flexier than normal metal forks, always and always. Some like it though!
Jamieknox11 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-05-29, 12:55 PM   #85
drumstuck
Unicyclist
 
drumstuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 223
This seems to be heading into a CF vs. Ti debate where CF is being cited as 'flexy' and Ti as 'rigid'. If anything the opposite is true, although both can be fashioned for either characteristic.

An F1 suspension wishbone is flat in the plane which is desired to be flexible, but the driver's monocoque is boxed in all planes required to be rigid. A CF bike fork (like any fork) is flexible because of the layback of the fork flexing over the forces in front of it's midpoint. On a uni the (very rigid) plane of circular cross section will usually be almost directly above the tyre contact point, potentially off-setting this.

Titanium is naturally flexible to the point where high end mtb's exploit this to have rear suspension section with no mechanical pivot (Litespeed, Merlin), just using the elastic resiliance of the ti flexing, and a shock in the gap of the rear triangle, to facilitate rear suspension. Ti has another property which borders on magical for mtb: it is 'dead' to many of the frequencies of vibration which make you feel numb and fatigued.

I believe it is the gusseted design of the Triton which makes it so rigid, and they are very rigid. Kona used to demonstrate the Hei Hei frame at trade shows by measuring the distance between dropouts and then compressing them together until they touched before micro-measuring the gap to prove that they had 'sprung' back to their exact original position. I struggle to detect any flex across the empty dropouts of a Triton trials frame by hand, it is quite amazingly rigid, even before you attach the wheel.

Exciting times though. We seem to be lucky enough to have top-level engineers fashioning one-wheeled exotica for us to choose between. Looking forward to these moving from unobtanium to obtanium...

Last edited by drumstuck; 2009-05-29 at 01:03 PM.
drumstuck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-05-29, 07:36 PM   #86
kerosian
USMC
 
kerosian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Peoria, Illinois
Age: 28
Posts: 1,097
CF being flexy is because of the resin used. Typically you want a flexible resin so that it is less likely to break or chip, if you use a harder resin, the brittleness goes up a little but the stiffness can skyrocket. Due to pure carbon's almost magical stiffness (many times greater than steel) if you add more layers of carbon or use a denser weave you can achieve much stiffer blends. The controllability of composites makes them much better than their metal bretheren for many applications. Also, adding boron fiber to carbon fiber makes a super stiff blend without compromising strength, Calfee Design uses boron/carbon blends in many of their bike frames.
__________________
Unicycle for Ra
kerosian is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-05-29, 08:46 PM   #87
Peripatet
Sometime one-wheeler
 
Peripatet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Hawaii!
Posts: 473
Send a message via Skype™ to Peripatet
I built an airplane wing out of a kevlar/carbon fiber weave. The kevlar was red and the carbon black, so it looked pretty gnarly. Had no stiffness issues, but then again our tolerance for flex was a bit more than you're talking here.
Peripatet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-05-29, 08:47 PM   #88
unicyclerman
jarin erickson
 
unicyclerman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: west jordan UT
Age: 28
Posts: 402
Send a message via AIM to unicyclerman Send a message via MSN to unicyclerman
ya i think once my frames get out there you will see. one of the advantages of not welding the frames is that we can have a great warranty. at any time if something breaks it can easily be replaced. we havnt worked out the details yet but im hoping we can just put a lifetime warranty on it. if not it would only be a 10 dollar repair tops unless you somehow total it, which considering my frame i think would be impossible. i would be fine with driving a car over the top of my frame.

i LOVE the welds on your frames btw. they are megan fox beautiful
__________________
WWW.EBUNICYCLES.COM top end uni parts.
street carbon frames now $400
unicyclerman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-05-29, 08:57 PM   #89
EB engineer
Kyle Erickson
 
EB engineer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: West Jordan, UT
Age: 32
Posts: 20
Good to see some more people with a real world knowledge of the properties of materials. Our carbon will use a stiff resin, and will be joined to the crown with an epoxy with a tensile strength of around 5000lbs, with tight tolerances between the surfaces. The crown itself is CNC'd from high grade billet aluminum using a surfacing program which will allow for smooth surfaces and high strength. Any of the pictures you have seen of the frame were of the preliminary prototype. The final prototype will be completed in a few weeks, with drastic changes to the shape. Out of curiosity, what grade of titanium is used on the custom frames? and is it vacuum welded?
EB engineer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-05-29, 09:52 PM   #90
kerosian
USMC
 
kerosian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Peoria, Illinois
Age: 28
Posts: 1,097
Quote:
Originally Posted by EB engineer View Post
Good to see some more people with a real world knowledge of the properties of materials. Our carbon will use a stiff resin, and will be joined to the crown with an epoxy with a tensile strength of around 5000lbs, with tight tolerances between the surfaces. The crown itself is CNC'd from high grade billet aluminum using a surfacing program which will allow for smooth surfaces and high strength. Any of the pictures you have seen of the frame were of the preliminary prototype. The final prototype will be completed in a few weeks, with drastic changes to the shape. Out of curiosity, what grade of titanium is used on the custom frames? and is it vacuum welded?
the titanium is a russian blend called OT4 I believe.
__________________
Unicycle for Ra
kerosian is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
custom, titanium, triton, unicycles, wurst


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Custom Qu-Ax unicycles 2simpl Unicycle Product Reviews 155 2014-07-31 08:10 PM
Custom Unicycles - Why? JJuggle General Unicycling Discussions 16 2013-02-03 04:33 AM
Custom Made Titanium Frame's and Seatpost's The UniSLAB General Unicycling Discussions 86 2008-07-20 03:52 PM
=> Custom Unicycles <= enzo ventura Unicycle Product Reviews 67 2007-12-30 10:15 PM
custom trials from GP unicycles saam General Unicycling Discussions 7 2005-03-17 08:26 AM


All times are GMT. The time now is 11:30 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © 2001-2019 Gilby
You Rated this Thread:
Page generated in 0.10226 seconds with 12 queries