Unicyclist Community

Unicyclist Community (http://www.unicyclist.com/forums/index.php)
-   General Unicycling Discussions (http://www.unicyclist.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=3)
-   -   Best Beginner Bike (England) (http://www.unicyclist.com/forums/showthread.php?t=120318)

Handmade Civet 2017-04-23 10:28 AM

Best Beginner Bike (England)
 
I've taken interest in learning how to unicycle and I've looked at some threads about the best beginner bike but all of them are ether in America or people have said that there not too strong, this is a problem for me as I'm quite heavy about 16 stone (100kg).
So I'm looking for some recommendations that would, A. Hold my weight and B. Cost at least less than 100 ideally less than 50 but I can see that is unlikely for what I'm looking for.
I've no particular desire to learn any tricks until I've ridden it for a while but I am looking to cycle reasonably long distance on it in excess of 100-200 metres.

Engineer on a Unicycle 2017-04-23 03:34 PM

Unless you want two wheels (in which case you'd have to ask elsewhere) you would be looking for a "uni" not a "bike" :)

100 is an odd number - it's just enough to get a decent beginner quality unicycle like a UDC (unicycle dot com) "club" model new, but around half of what something more heavily built would cost. Typically the more solid unicycles have an an ISIS splined hub rather than square taper crank attachment, machined bearing holders both in and oppose the frame rather than thin metal straps across the bottom (or the "lollipop" holders of the used one you found), and apart from specialty or indoor models would typically have a tire at least as wide as that on a mountain bike, either with a road or offroad tread pattern depending on intended usage.

Chances are you'd do best looking in the used market as you already have - either for a very cheap beginner unicycle, or a more solid used one at your price limit.

Especially if your height is proportionate you can include 24 inch wheels in your search - apart from sitting 5cm higher, they are in a way easier to ride as balance changes a little bit more slowly. And they may well come with a wider tire that feels a little more proportionate. But you can certainly ride a 20, especially on flat surfaces.

You'll want a seatpost long enough to get you out of the extreme bent knee territory. Crank length is a matter of preference, like you want something in the range of 125-150mm to start. Personally I find 150's feel too long for a small wheel, but some would supply that stock for a 24 inch one.

Some solid makes frequently seen are Nimbus (UDC's better line, vs. Club, their cheaper), Kris Holm, QU-AX, and probably many others.

Mikefule 2017-04-24 05:02 AM

Those of us who remember the days before splined cranks and machined bearing holders know that a unicycle with square tapered cranks and pressed steel bearing holders works perfectly well for normal riding. I still own 3 such unis and I often ride two of them off road.

Almost any 20" or 24" uni will do for you to learn to ride on, and you will find that a 24" is a versatile size. If you start to make progress, your first upgrade should be some grippier pedals.

Longerseattubes are available from unicycle dot com if you are tall. You need to choose the right diameter.

Your weight will not be a problem for the uni as long as you ride it rather than bouncing about on it.

They used to sell 20" unis with 5 inch cranks and 24" unis with 6 inch cranks as standard. That's 125 and 150 mm respectively.

Just go for it and have fun.


All times are GMT. The time now is 03:26 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © 2001-2019 Gilby

Page generated in 0.05022 seconds with 9 queries