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Fungip
2014-05-13, 08:23 PM
My 29" Foss tube went flat. I put my regular rubber emergency tube on and couldn't believe the difference in the ride. I read that the Foss tube can be repaired using heat and pinching the material together. Did this work out for anyone? Does anyone know a good method to fix the hole so I can use the tube for a back-up, or should I just trash it? I didn't see Foss tubes for sale at the Unicycle.com site so I ordered the Nimbus clear light weight tube and found a Foss tube for sale on eBay. Is the Foss better than the Nimbus? I can't wait to get the rubber tube off the tire, it's terrible. I'll probably carry whatever spare light weight tube arrives at my home as the back-up and use the first one that arrives unless some knows the one tube is much better than the other.

davejh
2014-05-13, 08:33 PM
Yep those blue ones on UDC are foss tubes.

Fortunately I havent punctured either of mine so I don't know the best patching method. There is a patch kit for them on sale though.

LanceB
2014-05-13, 09:16 PM
Here's a youtube on the heat method.

foss.mpg - YouTube

Byc
2014-05-13, 09:26 PM
You can always purchase a patch for foss tubes.

Greetings

Byc

MuniAddict
2014-05-13, 09:36 PM
Use the FOSS tube patches. Peel & stick and that's it. More than 1,000 miles on mine and no leaks yet. :-D

Mikefule
2014-05-13, 09:55 PM
I tried to heat repair mine and failed. However, a patch repair was easy and successful.

The 36" Foss tube makes the uni ride completely differently. It's amazing.

Fungip
2014-05-13, 11:56 PM
Thanks for the info. I'll have to get some patches added to the tube I already ordered from UDC.

MuniAddict
2014-05-14, 12:05 AM
62180

LanceB
2014-05-14, 12:14 AM
After thinking about it for about a year, I finally ordered a Foss tube for my Coker. (And a patch kit.)
Just from this thread. (Sometimes it takes me a long time to do stuff.)

Fungip
2014-05-14, 02:32 AM
Where did you get the six pack of patches Terry? It looks like UDC sells a pack of one for $4.50.

Fungip
2014-05-14, 02:46 AM
I was probably wrong regarding the FOSS patch kit containing one patch. The packet does not show a patch count on the UDC site.

MuniAddict
2014-05-14, 03:19 AM
I believe this (http://www.unicycle.com/unicycle-hardware/tires-tubes-rim-strips-and-valve-caps/tubes/nimbus-clear-patch-kit.html) comes with 6 patches, but you can call UDC to confirm.

pierrox
2014-05-14, 07:42 AM
The 36" Foss tube makes the uni ride completely differently. It's amazing.

In what sense?

Thioden
2014-05-14, 08:04 AM
I'm assuming Mikefule is referring to the lighter rotational weight of the wheel, this has a noticeable impact on the riding experience.

paxuni
2014-05-14, 11:52 AM
UDC US has Foss (Nimbus clear) tubes on sale for $10. This is for the 20, 26 & 29" only, not 36" :(

Mikefule
2014-05-14, 12:31 PM
Not just the lighter rotational weight. The tube is thinner and flexes more easily compared to the standard heavy gauge tube, so I swear that the ride feels smoother.

When I first fitted the tube I immediately noticed this difference - nothing to do with accelerating. decelerating, turning or idling, just a smoother ride.

I then went for a period when I put the old standard tube back in because the Foss had a puncture. When I put the Foss tube back in, I noticed the difference again, straight away.

There is more going on here than a change in weight, or even slight differences in pressure.

LanceB
2014-05-19, 01:10 AM
After thinking about it for about a year, I finally ordered a Foss tube for my Coker. (And a patch kit.)
Just from this thread. (Sometimes it takes me a long time to do stuff.)

So, I ordered the tube last week and got it on Friday. I installed it Saturday afternoon, and took it down to the local bike path for a ride this afternoon (Sunday). Checked the pressure before starting out -- 51.5. Seemed like a reasonable place to start. I had taken a couple trial rides up and down the block to start with, probably not more than 500 feet total. As I stood in the parking lot, waiting for a friend to arrive for our ride, it just blew out. No warning or provocation, just blew out. I took it home and removed it -- the tube had failed at the nozzle junction. Anyone had this happen to them? I sent this photo to UDC, I'm hoping they will take it back as a warranty return.
Any comments?
cheers

Killian
2014-05-19, 01:15 AM
Another Foss tube bites the dust... :rolleyes:

muni tasmania
2014-05-19, 01:49 AM
Dont get me wrong i do like Foss tubes.

Just they didnt like me.... Brand new tube....

I think the tyre was at fault here and it all went bad that day. The old tyres wire bead came through the sidewall and popped the tube.
They seem fragile and not as forgiving as trusty old faithfully rubber tubes.

Safe to say i have tried most kinds and now have converted to tubeless and cant say i will ever be looking back

LanceB
2014-05-19, 03:08 AM
Tubeless is definitely intriguing, but I'm a little hesitant to try it. Has anyone gone tubeless with a Nightrider tire on a Coker 36" rim? (I'm assuming it's the original rim with the "Big One" uni, but I bought it used, so I can't swear to it. Black, with a machined sidewall, says "Coker Cycle Company" on it.) I'd be interested to hear how they fared.

paxuni
2014-05-19, 11:26 AM
So, I ordered the tube last week and got it on Friday. I installed it Saturday afternoon, and took it down to the local bike path for a ride this afternoon (Sunday). Checked the pressure before starting out -- 51.5. Seemed like a reasonable place to start. I had taken a couple trial rides up and down the block to start with, probably not more than 500 feet total. As I stood in the parking lot, waiting for a friend to arrive for our ride, it just blew out. No warning or provocation, just blew out. I took it home and removed it -- the tube had failed at the nozzle junction. Anyone had this happen to them? I sent this photo to UDC, I'm hoping they will take it back as a warranty return.
Any comments?
cheers

I had that happen to me- but after a few weeks of riding. The valve hole on the 36" rim (nimbus 2) on my KH is oversized for the Foss valve. The description of the Foss tube says it has a valve washer but this wasn't the case with my tube (unless you count the integrated minimal reinforcement around the valve stem).

This likely was the cause of my tube's failure at 60 psi road riding.

I tried heat repair but was unsuccessful. From years of bike riding the puncture at the valve is as good as impossible to patch.

I brought this to UDC US's attention and they honored the warranty sending a new replacement tube.

This has been installed over a year now but I made a tight fitting washer around the valve stem and too big valve hole to reinforce this weak point. I used a piece of strong Dacron fabric but a ring of old inner tube might also work. Maybe two layers even.

Thank you for the reminder. I'm about to put a Foss in my road 29". I'll be checking valve hole size and likely reinforcing.

I hope your local UDC is as good as UDC US. Edit: I see you are in the US- I read MuniTasmania's post and was still thinking other countries.

pax

LanceB
2014-05-19, 03:08 PM
That's good input, paxuni, thanks very much. I read and followed the Foss installation instructions as well as I could, but they didn't say anything about maximum hole diameter for the inlet valve nozzle. I've never really paid much attention to this particular detail. Is there a standard size for the inlet valve hole? I haven't heard back yet from UDC (US) regarding whether or not they'll replace it, but in any case, I'll pay close attention to this detail in the future. Perhaps adding a close-fitting flat washer to the nozzle would prevent this from happening. Would be cheap insurance.
cheers

LanceB
2014-05-19, 04:58 PM
Well, the good news is that UDC says they are sending me a new tube to replace the failed one. Thanks very much, UDC.

Interestingly, the person on the phone advised during the conversation to run my tire pressure at 45 psi, and that higher than that was risking a blowout. This was news to me. Can anyone shed any light on this? I'm running a Nightrider tire, on the UDC website listing for this tire it says it's rated to 65 psi. I have been running it at about 55 for quite a while (with the rubber tube). Is the Foss tube the weak link? (I was running 51.5 when it blew out yesterday.)
thanks.

MuniAddict
2014-05-19, 05:09 PM
I've been running 55-60psi in the same FOSS tube (KH 36er) for years with no ill effects. I don't know if rider weight has any bearing on the tube life, but uneven, bumpy terrain, especially if you take it offroad, could lead to premature tube failure or leaks. Also not sure if the FOSS tube is inherently weaker than the much heavier rubber tubes, but so far I haven't seen any evidence in this regard.

Killian
2014-05-19, 05:10 PM
Yep, its the tube IMO. Foss tubes have proven to be finicky, and UDC is probably trying to cut down on warranty claims :). I don't care for someone telling you to run under a certain psi, when a tube should be perfectly capable of handling the pressure.

MuniAddict
2014-05-19, 10:33 PM
Also note that the tube must be installed with the seam (also called "junction") in *front* of the stem, in the direction of travel. Installing it the opposite way can cause failure. And they also warn against inflating the tube *outside* of the tire. which can permanently deform the tube causing premature failure. I assume they mean full or excessive inflation, not just a little bit to make the tube easier to install, and so it won't get twisted inside the tire.

62306

Killian
2014-05-19, 11:46 PM
Does anyone know why the seam must be in front of the stem?

MuniAddict
2014-05-20, 12:10 AM
Here's the official FOSS installation guide (http://www.foss.com.tw/fabricating/DABO.pdf). Seems like a lot of steps required to install it, but it's really not that hard and correct installation is important.

Killian
2014-05-20, 12:22 AM
I still don't see how having the seam on one side or the other would make a difference.

MuniAddict
2014-05-20, 12:55 AM
It may have something more to do with bikes, in that when you do hard braking from high speed, if the seam was behind the stem there could be more force pulling at the seam. May not be the reason but it's possible.

Siddhartha Valmont
2014-05-21, 01:32 PM
That is very unfortunate what happened to you LanceB. I will lean on the side of defective unit (in mass production there is no 100% success rate).

My experience with FOSS tube is pretty good. Running one on my 29er at 58 PSI on the road and 25 PSI on the trails and no problem to report. I went also to a FOSS tube on my 26 and just my first flat two weeks ago (like any other tube).

I am confident that the nice folks at UDC will process it under warranty.

LanceB
2014-05-21, 02:39 PM
Yes, they are sending me a new one, no hassles (thanks UDC!). I will report back after installing the new one (paying particular attention to the air valve area).
Good to know you are running higher air pressures without problems. I usually run about 55 on the road, but I'll give 45 a try and see how it feels.

cheers

MuniAddict
2014-05-21, 03:14 PM
Make certain that the rim strip fits correctly, doesn't shift, and fully covers the spoke holes. You should also run your hand along the *inside* of the tire to make sure there is nothing sticking through, like a thorn that had broken off and is only now on the inside. And try to follow the installation instructions in the FOSS installation guide (http://www.foss.com.tw/fabricating/DABO.pdf).

DavidHood
2014-05-21, 03:34 PM
I've been running a FOSS tube in a Vee Rubber Off-road 36" tire on a Stealth 2 Dominator rim for a couple of years now without incident (knock wood). I've always said I'd replace it with a real rubber tube if it ever fails only because my 36er has a Schlumpf geared hub which adds a little extra hassle when changing tires and tubes. That 36er is really set-up for road riding only so I typically run higher (between 45-50 psi) pressures. It does hold pressure fairly well but I do need to add some air from time to time especially in those winter months when I might not ride for a couple of weeks.

I've also been running a FOSS tube in my KH29 for a few months riding MUni with moderate drops. The tire is a Hans Dampf and the rim is 47mm wide with the lightening holes. I know it is not "recommended" to run the FOSS tube with the holes but I'm a rebel. My 29er by far the lightest unicycle in my quiver. I love it!

Fungip
2014-05-23, 01:55 AM
I run the tire pressure with the FOSS tube between 60-65 psi and never had a problem. I think my tube failed when the LBS replaced a few broken spokes for me and didn't check if the tube was in the tire correctly when they put it back together. I am glad to have a FOSS tube back in the tire after riding a little while with the back-up rubber tube. I would give the FOSS tube another chance Lance. The first one was probably defective.

HudsonAktau
2014-05-23, 03:35 AM
Sorry for lame question but will FOSS 29X1.95-2.25 fit my 29x2.35 (60-622) Schwalbe Hans Dampf?

LanceB
2014-05-23, 04:02 AM
I run the tire pressure with the FOSS tube between 60-65 psi and never had a problem. I think my tube failed when the LBS replaced a few broken spokes for me and didn't check if the tube was in the tire correctly when they put it back together. I am glad to have a FOSS tube back in the tire after riding a little while with the back-up rubber tube. I would give the FOSS tube another chance Lance. The first one was probably defective.

I received the replacement Foss tube today. I'll put it in and give it another try on Saturday. Not wanting to have a repeat of the first go-round, I bought a pack of plastic washers that fit around the valve nozzle. I'm hoping it will reinforce the area where the tube meets the valve hole in the rim. (I don't know if that was really a factor or not, but I'm just hoping for a little "insurance.") I'll take a picture and post it when I install the tube.

cheers

Fungip
2014-05-23, 04:55 PM
Good luck with the new tube LanceB. I have the stock rim that came with the Nimbus 29"Road uni. It is the Dominator rim that someone else noted that they never had a problem with either. The rim may be a factor in supporting the reliability of the FOSS tube.

davejh
2014-05-23, 11:11 PM
Sorry for lame question but will FOSS 29X1.95-2.25 fit my 29x2.35 (60-622) Schwalbe Hans Dampf?

Yep it will expand to fit the hans with no problem.

If you suddenly want to go back down in size to a big apple 2.0 or similar, you will find the tube is now too big. I spent the winter with a kink in my tube so it would fit in my big apple to avoid trashing my hans with grit.

Im back to using the tube with the hans again and have had no problem but i would recommend against changing to smaller tyre sizes with foss tubes. Mine run at 40 on the coker and 18-20 on my 29er so blow outs are less likely...

As for defects, my valve stem on my 29er is slightly loose and can rotate unless held while removing the valve cap. It doesn't lose any air but its still slightly worrying.

HudsonAktau
2014-05-24, 02:04 AM
Yep it will expand to fit the hans with no problem.

If you suddenly want to go back down in size to a big apple 2.0 or similar, you will find the tube is now too big. I spent the winter with a kink in my tube so it would fit in my big apple to avoid trashing my hans with grit.

Im back to using the tube with the hans again and have had no problem but i would recommend against changing to smaller tyre sizes with foss tubes. Mine run at 40 on the coker and 18-20 on my 29er so blow outs are less likely...

As for defects, my valve stem on my 29er is slightly loose and can rotate unless held while removing the valve cap. It doesn't lose any air but its still slightly worrying.
Thank you.
I have Hans 2.35 and Big Apple 2.35 for my 29er - no step back expected :rolleyes:
*Went for ordering*

leo
2014-06-03, 12:51 AM
so I swear that the ride feels smoother.
In 2012 I made the same statement (http://www.unicyclist.com/forums/showthread.php?t=92182&page=3), but more about latex, which is a bigger difference versus butyl than a foss tube already is.
But aracer started comparing clinchers and tubes, while I was meant the difference of latex and butyl.

HudsonAktau
2014-06-22, 05:50 AM
Let me introduce my brand new 29" FOSS tube!
She woke me up @ 5:18 today by incredible loud blow!
Anyway I glad that it happened at home, not during ride.
No single ride was on this tube, only installed it evening before. Pumped up to 25 PSI.

It even took off the tire. So I did not try it :(

http://i1287.photobucket.com/albums/a624/HudsonAktau/f420bc76cc06807a490789a0376efabe_zpseed687b1.jpg

http://i1287.photobucket.com/albums/a624/HudsonAktau/4c18289f3990839ac607714d60bdd483_zps43739b1f.jpg

rogeratunicycledotcom
2014-06-22, 06:30 AM
HudsonAktau, are you sure that it was not the tyre that came off and then the innertube protruded and exploded. With the tyre and rim combination you have, this is quite likely. They are notoriously slack and I have seen this several times.

Roger

HudsonAktau
2014-06-22, 06:35 AM
HudsonAktau, are you sure that it was not the tyre that came off and then the innertube protruded and exploded. With the tyre and rim combination you have, this is quite likely. They are notoriously slack and I have seen this several times.

Roger

I do not think so. I've put regular tube right after this happened (same way) and rode 27,5km with no any issues.
May be there was tube pinch... This is only reason I see now. But I doing it for years and never had pinches before...

rogeratunicycledotcom
2014-06-22, 06:56 AM
I do not think so. I've put regular tube right after this happened (same way) and rode 27,5km with no any issues.
May be there was tube pinch... This is only reason I see now. But I doing it for years and never had pinches before...

The Foss tube does not grip the tyre like a standard innertube and this means that tyres that are slack are more likely to come off. The blow out section you show looks more like a blow out from outside the tyre than a pinch weakness.

Roger

HudsonAktau
2014-06-22, 06:59 AM
The Foss tube does not grip the tyre like a standard innertube and this means that tyres that are slack are more likely to come off. The blow out section you show looks more like a blow out from outside the tyre than a pinch weakness.

Roger
So is this ok for FOSS tube to blow during the night? :(

Thanks a lot for explanation. Will continue using regular tubes.

rogeratunicycledotcom
2014-06-22, 07:01 AM
Yes, of course it is. Unfortunately my advice is not to use them on slack tyre/rim combinations.

Mikefule
2014-06-22, 09:34 AM
I now have Foss tubes in my 36 and my 29. Both unis ride better. I repaired a puncture on the 29 recently - the process was quicker and easier than using traditional glue and patches on a standard tube.

I have had standard tubes explode in normal use, just riding and then bang! I have also had a standard tube blow while a uni was parked, although it was parked in direct sunlight.

Foss tubes are a good product. Like any product, however, they have pros and cons, and you may sometimes get a bad one.

I will continue to use Foss tubes and recommend them.

Juni
2015-03-24, 06:12 PM
Just to update this Foss tube thread. I've had my 36er Oracle, with Foss tube as standard, for about 1000 miles. So far no problems, although I did notice I've needed to top the air up a little bit once a week, for the last couple of months. Then today I noticed why...

Yes, the pics show what has been stuck in there for the last few months! :eek:
So I guess I can safely say that it self seals when punctured.
It deflated in about 5 seconds, when I pulled that tree branch out :p

I've got a Foss patch kit on order, and will update when its (hopefully) fixed.

Piece Maker
2015-03-24, 06:55 PM
I thought you ran a 29er tube? :D

Cool to know they work well though, that was a beast of a hole!

Juni
2015-03-24, 07:15 PM
No, I recommended someone on strava try the 29er overinflating technique, while he's waiting for his new 36er inner tube.

I'm gonna give it a go tomorrow morning, while I'm waiting for my patches to arrive :)

UniMyra
2015-03-25, 07:43 AM
I fixed my 36'er Foss tube yesterday with a Foss patch and pumped the tyre to maybe 20 psi and left it over night. This morning I pumped it up to 55 psi, but after a couple of minutes all the air went out with a hissing noise. I have used a Foss patch a few years back with a good result.

Now to my question: Does the Foss patches go out of date? Mine are maybe 3 years old.

munimag
2015-03-25, 12:26 PM
I used a Foss patch recently for the first time and experienced a similar failure of the patch. I ended up using a lighter to melt the punctured area and pinch it shut. There are videos on Youtube of how to do it. It worked well once I got the hang of it. If the tube doesn't feel hot between your fingers when you pinch it, it hasn't melted enough. It took me a few times to get it right.

Juni
2015-03-25, 01:56 PM
My patches arrived today :)

After fixing the main puncture in the pic, I did the water test, just to make sure it's holding, and it is!
But I then realised I had 3 other punctures to fix :eek:
So, I'm just about to put some air in now. Here goes Foss tube patch test, x4...

Piece Maker
2015-03-25, 02:37 PM
3 more punctures...? How did your tyre ever stay up?? :D

Hope to see you riding soon!

Juni
2015-03-25, 03:01 PM
I'm gonna head out for a quickie 10 miles soon Piece Maker, to make sure its holding up alright. So far its holding though :)

volock
2015-03-26, 03:05 AM
Given the apparent material they're made of, I wonder how TearAid (probably type A) would do on one as a patch. I've used it with success on other bike tubes... I mostly own a roll of it as I use it for patching LEI kite bladders, but given all the posts here, it got me thinking.

Juni
2015-04-10, 05:41 PM
Just a quick update on this. All 4 puncture repairs are holding up perfectly, not even a slight bit of pressure loss :)

Piece Maker
2015-04-10, 05:50 PM
Good to hear! :D

Any idea when UDC UK are getting the 36er FOSS's back in stock? :D

Juni
2015-04-10, 06:38 PM
Good to hear! :D

Any idea when UDC UK are getting the 36er FOSS's back in stock? :D

They said April, so I guess any time from now until the end of April ;)

Piece Maker
2015-04-10, 07:17 PM
Sounds good! Got another (EXTREMELY slow) puncture over the weekend. My 36er tyre is starting to resemble patchwork... Could definitely use a replacement soonish!

Juni
2015-04-10, 07:32 PM
Sounds good! Got another (EXTREMELY slow) puncture over the weekend. My 36er tyre is starting to resemble patchwork... Could definitely use a replacement soonish!

Surely you mean your inner tube? How many miles have you done on your TA tyre?

UniMyra
2015-07-14, 07:56 PM
Has anyone used a Foss tube in a 3" wide tyre? I was planning on using a Foss tube with my 26 x 3 tyre, but on the box it says that maximum width is 2.25.

UniMyra
2015-07-15, 01:55 PM
Ok so I put the Foss tube in, and it seems good. I don't get to test it for real yet because of bad weather. My Nimbus Oracle 26 feels pretty light now with Surly Knard tyre and Foss inner tube.

Steeley
2015-07-28, 10:53 AM
Well finally bit the bullet and fitted a Foss tube to my Nimbus 36. The old tube just died of old age (rubbed on drilled holes in the rim). Pulled off the protective tape and filed all of the sharp edges off the holes (very sharp and raised), replaced the tape and fitted the new tube. Went for a ride - did around 14km. Two mornings later there was a loud bang in the garage and the tyre was as flat as a tack! Pulled it all apart again (damn the tyre is a pain to get on and off) and a small hole had appeared on the inside edge of the tube against the rim. The protective tape still seemed in place and undamaged. I cleaned the rim again, added another layer of soft tape over the standard protective tape, repaired the tube and put it all back together again. Fingers crossed that it holds up this time or I am back to standard tubes. As a side note, the schrader valve in tube is set very deep and I had to wind it out a little to pump the tyre up, then tighten it when finished - kind of annoying!

Steeley
2015-08-03, 09:56 AM
Oh well I tried! The repair and refit lasted just 2 days - back to standard tubes for me :) The good news is I can now change the tyre very quickly!

Piece Maker
2016-05-15, 04:46 PM
Well, this week I learned tubes go in blue, and come out green. Gross! :eek:

https://mediagoblin.piecemaker.rocks/mgoblin_media/media_entries/181/image20160514_201745944.medium.jpg

Sadly my tube has pushed through the rim and blown up twice this week, so I'm replacing it, but thought it was interesting to see how it was green when it came out :D

leo
2016-05-15, 05:19 PM
There's now a German alternative (http://www.unicyclist.org/blog/show.cfm?serial=01043).
And there's a Swiss alternative (http://www.unicyclist.org/blog/show.cfm?serial=01044).
That last one took forever to become truly available.
Still I would love to have 20" x 2.1 latex innertube.

UniDreamerFR
2016-05-15, 05:43 PM
Well, this week I learned tubes go in blue, and come out green. Gross! :eek:

https://mediagoblin.piecemaker.rocks/mgoblin_media/media_entries/181/image20160514_201745944.medium.jpg

Sadly my tube has pushed through the rim and blown up twice this week, so I'm replacing it, but thought it was interesting to see how it was green when it came out :D

Speaking of tubes, (but not really related to this topic), I see you use the qu-ax handle with the foam protection (I had also been using this handle for a while).
The foam is really comfortable but the issue is that it gets deteriorated at each single UPD.
I do not use this handle anymore for now but I use the same foam tubes (that you can buy for few $//) to protect my handlebars and to protect this foam I used an old 24" tube.
Here is a picture:
http://img15.hostingpics.net/pics/43195720160515192601.jpg

I'm already speaking about this in this Post (http://unicyclist.com/forums/showpost.php?p=1668483&postcount=11)

Anyway,concerning foss tubes I have been using it on my 29er, my 36er and my ungeared 26er and never had any issue so far.
I just have to inflate it before a ride since it slowly deflates between each ride.
The only time I had got a flat with my 36er wheel was with the original 36er tube and the TA tire that I tried to inflate more than the 32 PSI (max recommended). Didn't notice it and found my tire perfectly flat.
The failure was around the valve, so not much difference with Foss tubes.

I now have a (much lighter) Nightrider tire and foss 36" tube and inflate it at about 40 PSI more or less 2 PSI depending on where I ride.

With how much PSI did you have a flat Piece Maker?

Piece Maker
2016-05-15, 07:52 PM
Speaking of tubes, (but not really related to this topic), I see you use the qu-ax handle with the foam protection (I had also been using this handle for a while).
The foam is really comfortable but the issue is that it gets deteriorated at each single UPD.



I don't use foam anymore because it gets trashed too easily - I use normal bicycle handlebar tape now (As you can see from my picture, I have some fun with it and wrap two different colours) :D



Anyway,concerning foss tubes I have been using it on my 29er, my 36er and my ungeared 26er and never had any issue so far.
I just have to inflate it before a ride since it slowly deflates between each ride.
The only time I had got a flat with my 36er wheel was with the original 36er tube and the TA tire that I tried to inflate more than the 32 PSI (max recommended). Didn't notice it and found my tire perfectly flat.
The failure was around the valve, so not much difference with Foss tubes.

I now have a (much lighter) Nightrider tire and foss 36" tube and inflate it at about 40 PSI more or less 2 PSI depending on where I ride.

With how much PSI did you have a flat Piece Maker?

I run about 45PSI in my tyre, give-take. The tube lasted me a whole year without a single flat at around that pressure, but this week I had two blowouts so decided to just replace it - the first one was while I was riding, and was more of a slow steady leak than a blowout, but the second one was a genuine kaboom - scared my mum half to death! :eek: My plan is to put some form of duct tape under the normal rim tape to pad it out a bit and prevent the tube blowing through the rim holes again, let's see if I can get more than a year out of it! :D

leo
2016-05-15, 11:35 PM
My plan is to put some form of duct tape under the normal rim tape to pad it out a bit and prevent the tube blowing through the rim holes again

I use trial rimtape meant for drilled rims for that, but isn't as strong as I wish.
You might try rimtape meant for tubeless, which anyway isn't leaking air trough.

Piece Maker
2016-05-16, 12:25 AM
I use trial rimtape meant for drilled rims for that, but isn't as strong as I wish.
You might try rimtape meant for tubeless, which anyway isn't leaking air trough.

Yeah I was going to try gorilla tape, which is the 'rim tape' I used when trying for tubeless and is strong as hell! :D

johnfoss
2016-05-17, 04:17 AM
I've had a Foss tube in my 36-er for several years now. My experience so far is that I've averaged more flats than in my pre-Foss days, but that's a comparison of one flat ever (on a 36") compared to 2 flats in maybe 4 years. During that time, I've had a much lighter wheel. Never tried stretching a 29" rim in there, but fear I would destroy it in the struggle to get the tire back on.
Does the Foss patches go out of date? Mine are maybe 3 years old.After my first Foss flat, 2-3 years ago, I replaced the tube with a fresh one. At that time, there weren't any Foss 36" tubes available so I ordered a set of patches. I've had the leaky tube in a big ziploc bag since then, until I developed a leak in my newer Foss tube. I found my Foss patches, which were still sealed in their original packaging, and gave one a try. It was by far the easiest patching job ever; no need to roughen up the surface! Just make sure it's clean and dry, then peel and stick the patch. I gave it some solid pressure with my fingers (squeezing it flat as it was off the rim), waited a while, and that was it. That was 2 weeks ago and the tire hasn't lost pressure.

So I still like my Foss tubes. They have the best looking valves, and somehow the name just sounds like it should be on my unicycles. :)

DISCLAIMER: I have no connection to the makers of the Foss tubes (no relation). I am still curious to know where/how they came up with the name, as it would surely be interesting to me and my relatives. I would happily be a sponsor in exchange for free product... :o

Piece Maker
2016-05-17, 10:20 AM
I've had a Foss tube in my 36-er for several years now. My experience so far is that I've averaged more flats than in my pre-Foss days, but that's a comparison of one flat ever (on a 36") compared to 2 flats in maybe 4 years. During that time, I've had a much lighter wheel. Never tried stretching a 29" rim in there, but fear I would destroy it in the struggle to get the tire back on.

I had zero flats on my FOSS aside from this week - so that's zero flats in ~13 months. On my old black butyl tube, I had... I wouldn't even know. My tube resembled patchwork as noted earlier on this thread, and one of the seams on the tube blew out so that tube was unfixable. I'd had the uni about 5-6 months at that point.

I dunno how I've had less flats - when I checked my tube, it didn't have any sealed holes in it. Guess I just got lucky :D

kamikaze
2016-05-17, 11:13 AM
There's now a German alternative (http://www.unicyclist.org/blog/show.cfm?serial=01043).
And there's a Swiss alternative (http://www.unicyclist.org/blog/show.cfm?serial=01044).
That last one took forever to become truly available.
Still I would love to have 20" x 2.1 latex innertube.Unfortunately no 36". I wrote to Schwalbe and they said they won't make a 36" version, because they don't have 36" tyres.

Piece Maker
2016-06-08, 10:05 PM
Well... This is disappointing. I got my new FOSS tube and chucked it in the tyre, all was well. I went for a long ride in the sun this weekend, and while sitting at the brewery getting drunk.. err, relaxing before my 12-mile ride home, my tube went with a bang again!

Pulled it out the tyre and, like my old green tube, the tube had blown out on the inside, as though it'd pressed through the rim holes. I was on a big group ride, and they were all awesome and helped me heave the tyre back on after patching the tube with a FOSS patch, but nope, it still leaked a bit. I managed to get home but had to pump it up a good 10+ times!

I got home, ripped the patch off (thinking I'd just applied it a bit bent and it was leaking out the side), and popped a new one on. Put it in the tyre, pumped to 30, and left it. I've checked on it and it's down again. I really don't see how I could've patched it wrong, you stick it on and hold it for a minute, and it's done, right? :eek:

Considering my previous tube lasted a whole year without issue, I'm a bit gutted to see this one only last a few weeks... I'm considering trying to melt it together, because otherwise I'm not going to be using this tube anyway, so might as well test the theory.

I'm probably going back to black tubes - I use my 36er to commute on and so would much rather take reliability over lightweight-ness. Maybe I'll try getting a 29er to stretch, but couldn't get that to work last time... Hmm, decisions!

juggleaddict
2016-06-08, 10:18 PM
do you happen to know whether the seam was in front or behind the valve? I remember hearing somewhere that that mattered....somehow....

I'm taking out my 29+ tube today because it's bulging and causing the tire to rub on the frame (not an oracle frame, an older nightrider frame with less clearance)

Swapping back to the commuter thick tube. It's what I have in my g36 too, because 1 scary blowout on a geared 36 is enough for me, thanks.

Piece Maker
2016-06-09, 01:01 AM
do you happen to know whether the seam was in front or behind the valve? I remember hearing somewhere that that mattered....somehow....


It's in front of the valve when at the bottom of the rotation, where the instructions point it.

The blow-out wasn't on the seam though, it was on the under-belly of the tube (ie. where it meets your rim strip) - there's a line going right round the inside of the tube, and it was along this that it blew out. My rim strip is perfect, no sign whatsoever of it forcing its way through it into the rim hole.

I've thrown in a butyl tube for now just so I can get back to uni commuting :D

Killian
2016-06-09, 04:24 AM
Why are people still using these? Why should it matter where a seam on your tube is?

It's asinine I'm sorry. Put a 29er tube in and call it a day.

lightbulbjim
2016-06-09, 05:22 AM
Put a 29er tube in and call it a day.

What do you do if you get a flat while riding?

johnfoss
2016-06-09, 06:05 AM
What do you do if you get a flat while riding?I move my furniture in. :cool:

UniMyra
2016-06-09, 06:43 AM
Well... This is disappointing. I got my new FOSS tube and chucked it in the tyre, all was well. I went for a long ride in the sun this weekend, and while sitting at the brewery getting drunk.. err, relaxing before my 12-mile ride home, my tube went with a bang again!

Did you check your tyre on the inside? Maybe something sharp is stuck there. When I get a flat and remove the tube, I mark the valve hole on the tyre. I also mark which way the tube was put in (mark the valve or something). That way when you find the puncture in the tube, you can locate where on the tyre the puncture happened by laying the tube over the wheel with the valve where the valve hole is. I found a tiny piece of glass in my tyre that way. When I got that puncture, I didn't notice until the next time I was going for a ride.

Edit: I didnt read good enough. I thoght the puncture was on the outside of your tube.

Piece Maker
2016-06-09, 10:09 AM
What do you do if you get a flat while riding?

Well, with a FOSS tube, you apparently patch it and still end up walking home :( So maybe a 29er isn't such a bad idea!

lightbulbjim
2016-06-09, 11:49 AM
I move my furniture in. :cool:
:o

Well, with a FOSS tube, you apparently patch it and still end up walking home :( So maybe a 29er isn't such a bad idea!
If it goes with a bang then you're probably right. I was thinking about running over a thorn which is big enough to defeat the magic self-healing Fossness but small enough that the tube is still intact. For such occasions I carry some Foss patches and a pump.

I like the idea of using a 29er tube since they're cheap and easy to come by. I just wonder whether they can be patched, or if they are stretched enough that any puncture would allow them to tear beyond the point of repair.

Maybe the point is moot since 36er punctures seem to be pretty rare. I've had two so far. The first time was a mysterious needle thorn thing. I patched with a Foss patch (at home) and all was well. Then a while later that tube went silently into the night. I went to go ride one morning and the tyre was flat, with a small hole by the valve. It had been fine the night before. No bangs or dramatic noises. I replaced it with another Foss tube for the above reasons but am considering a 29er tube next time.

Killian
2016-06-09, 01:51 PM
What do you do if you get a flat while riding?

Put your spare 29er tube in. Then when you get home you can try patching it with your normal, non-proprietary patches.

Piece Maker
2016-06-09, 11:03 PM
Put your spare 29er tube in. Then when you get home you can try patching it with your normal, non-proprietary patches.

Gonna try a 29er tube this weekend. Is it just, stretch it over the rim, pump it up to be circular, leave overnight, then fit it inside a tyre the normal way? Or is there more (or less) to it?

lightbulbjim
2016-06-09, 11:29 PM
Put your spare 29er tube in.

leave overnight

That's what I'm leary of. Are they reliable if you just slap one in and ride? Thinking about side of the road repairs here...

Killian
2016-06-09, 11:51 PM
Put it on like a regular tube.

Leave one bead of the tire on the rim, put your valve stem in, and working from the valve stem down stretch the tube onto the rim.

It'll hang over the rim bead but that's okay. Now make sure it's not twisted anywhere. Go around the whole tube and make sure it's flat on the rim.

Now put some air in it until it just starts to get some shape. Go around the wheel and make sure it's as far into the rim as it can go.

Now you should be able to work the other bead onto the rim. Once on, put a little more air in. Now walk the tire around pushing it into the rim to make sure the beads don't stick up.

Now because I'm crazy, I'll deflate all the way again and then re inflate to riding pressure. This is one last step to eliminate twists in the tube. I do this with all tubes. On the road you can skip this part.

It's really not any different then a regular tube, you just want to be careful and make sure beads are pushed in, and you don't pinch the tube.

Do not use tire levers no matter how bad you want to.

lightbulbjim
2016-06-10, 12:21 AM
Put it on like a regular tube.

Leave one bead of the tire on the rim, put your valve stem in, and working from the valve stem down stretch the tube onto the rim.

It'll hang over the rim bead but that's okay. Now make sure it's not twisted anywhere. Go around the whole tube and make sure it's flat on the rim.

Now put some air in it until it just starts to get some shape. Go around the wheel and make sure it's as far into the rim as it can go.

Now you should be able to work the other bead onto the rim. Once on, put a little more air in. Now walk the tire around pushing it into the rim to make sure the beads don't stick up.

Now because I'm crazy, I'll deflate all the way again and then re inflate to riding pressure. This is one last step to eliminate twists in the tube. I do this with all tubes. On the road you can skip this part.

It's really not any different then a regular tube, you just want to be careful and make sure beads are pushed in, and you don't pinch the tube.

Do not use tire levers no matter how bad you want to.
Thanks, that's reassuring since it's how I would fit any tube anyway. So it sounds like it's not too much hassle. I'm going to give it a go if/when my current Foss tube bites the dust.

Piece Maker
2016-06-10, 10:17 AM
Do not use tire levers no matter how bad you want to.

You've never used a TA/Qu-Ax rim combo have you :rolleyes:

I'll see about trying it soon, you may it sound like pre-stretching isn't even necessary which sounds a bit strange, but I suppose that's good!

Killian
2016-06-10, 02:03 PM
No I don't prestretch the tube since imo it doesn't accomplish anything. I pulled a 29er tube out of my 36 after a year and it was still pretty much a 29er tube. It still needed stretched and all that.

Regarding the TA on the Qu Ax rim, I have not messed with one but I have put Gatorskins on CR18s with velox rim tape (read: very tight) and it just took some time.

Tire levers with a 29er tube is asking for trouble unless you are VERY careful. As a rule I think it's good practice to never use them.

johnfoss
2016-06-11, 06:21 AM
Do not use tire levers no matter how bad you want to.That's good advice but also can't be applied to any 36" rim I've had. My current setup (Nimbus rim with the holes, Nimbus tire) almost requires a crowbar to get the tire back on. That might be the reason I haven't tried the 29" tube thing. Plus I like having a FOSS product on a unicycle. :)

Piece Maker
2016-06-11, 12:17 PM
That's good advice but also can't be applied to any 36" rim I've had. My current setup (Nimbus rim with the holes, Nimbus tire) almost requires a crowbar to get the tire back on. )

My point exactly with the TA/Qu-Ax combo. It ends up about 4 inches off the rim when you get to the last bit. I have worked it on with fingers before but it took me a LONG time and I REALLY worked at it.

Plus, is a stretched 29er really much more fragile than a FOSS? I managed those fine with levers, the trick is just not to stick it in your tube like an idiot :D

pierrox
2016-06-11, 01:05 PM
.
Plus, is a stretched 29er really much more fragile than a FOSS? I managed those fine with levers, the trick is just not to stick it in your tube like an idiot :D

Shouldn't be more fragile. If you inflate one out of tire, you'll be surprised by how much it stretches.

jtrops
2016-06-11, 01:37 PM
I'm with Killian on this one; however, there is a bead jack that is made for installing tires.

I used a 29er tube in a TA, on a Quax rim, and never needed a lever to install the tire. I did use clamps to keep the beads together in the "well" of the rim on the opposite side. Without that I might have needed the "bead jack," but really it is a last resort.

Killian
2016-06-11, 09:12 PM
My point exactly with the TA/Qu-Ax combo. It ends up about 4 inches off the rim when you get to the last bit. I have worked it on with fingers before but it took me a LONG time and I REALLY worked at it.

Plus, is a stretched 29er really much more fragile than a FOSS? I managed those fine with levers, the trick is just not to stick it in your tube like an idiot :D

It's not more fragile, but since you're stretching the tube on it is very easy to pinch it.

I'd suggest trying soapy water on the bead if you didn't already.

I'd do whatever I had to do to not use levers. I hate those things.

kamikaze
2016-06-15, 02:20 PM
I've been riding Foss in the KH36 for a couple of weeks now and there are two things I wonder about:

1)
It looses air pretty quickly, something like 100 kPa per week (1 bar drop). Did I somehow inflict a minor puncture on the tube while installing or is the valve (I'm riding the UDC Schrader valve edition) really that shitty?

2)
There is a lot of clearance between the valve and the rim, because it's skinny and doesn't have threads on the outside to put one of those circular nuts on it that are used to keep the valve from disappearing inside the rim on low pressures.
I'm wondering, how do I keep the rim from filling with water and dirt. Small amounts of water can evaporate, but as far as I can tell dirt stays in the rim till I dismantle the wheel to get it out.

juggleaddict
2016-06-15, 05:28 PM
I've been riding Foss in the KH36 for a couple of weeks now and there are two things I wonder about:

1)
It looses air pretty quickly, something like 100 kPa per week (1 bar drop). Did I somehow inflict a minor puncture on the tube while installing or is the valve (I'm riding the UDC Schrader valve edition) really that shitty?

2)
There is a lot of clearance between the valve and the rim, because it's skinny and doesn't have threads on the outside to put one of those circular nuts on it that are used to keep the valve from disappearing inside the rim on low pressures.
I'm wondering, how do I keep the rim from filling with water and dirt. Small amounts of water can evaporate, but as far as I can tell dirt stays in the rim till I dismantle the wheel to get it out.

1) it's not the valve, it's the rubber itself that it's seeping through. If you've ever owned a road bike (high pressure, low volume) you are familiar with tubes being porous and having the fill them regularly. The foss tubes are more porous than the basic 36er tube, probably due to the material, and them being thinner.

2) It looks like you have a rim designed for the old 36er tube that used a HUGE hole for the valve stem. I have one wheel with that and use the old "commuter" tube. Unicycle.com/uk has something similar http://www.unicycle.uk.com/unicycle-parts/rims/rim-parts/rim-hole-convertor.html and http://www.unicycle.uk.com/unicycle-parts/rims/rim-parts/valve-grommet.html, but I would contact them directly to see if they have something specifically for the older 36er rims to make it compatible with the new tube. It's not a normal Schrader size.

kamikaze
2016-06-16, 03:24 PM
1) it's not the valve, it's the rubber itself that it's seeping through. If you've ever owned a road bike (high pressure, low volume) you are familiar with tubes being porous and having the fill them regularly. The foss tubes are more porous than the basic 36er tube, probably due to the material, and them being thinner.
That makes me wonder, can I reduce that problem by putting a little bit of tyre sealant used in tubeless setups in to seal the pores? I mean the Foss tube weighs a whooping 410g less than the stock tube, even with 20g of sealant it would still be a big win.

2) It looks like you have a rim designed for the old 36er tube that used a HUGE hole for the valve stem. I have one wheel with that and use the old "commuter" tube. Unicycle.com/uk has something similar http://www.unicycle.uk.com/unicycle-parts/rims/rim-parts/rim-hole-convertor.html and http://www.unicycle.uk.com/unicycle-parts/rims/rim-parts/valve-grommet.html, but I would contact them directly to see if they have something specifically for the older 36er rims to make it compatible with the new tube. It's not a normal Schrader size.I'll have a look.

Siddhartha Valmont
2016-06-20, 10:59 AM
There is a lot of clearance between the valve and the rim, because it's skinny and doesn't have threads on the outside to put one of those circular nuts on it that are used to keep the valve from disappearing inside the rim on low pressures.


I you are annoyed by the adjustment, you can put some electrical tape around it (either directly or by removing it and reinserting it with the tape).

I used this trick on a regular tube on one uni just to be able to put the pump in place without the valve disappearing in the rim.

UniDreamerFR
2016-06-23, 04:32 PM
Was on my 36er, riding with Pierrox on his G24, we were about to finish our ride after 18km when I realize my tire has much rebound when I'm mounting and hopping (that's my freemount technique), so I check the pressure with my digital manometer and it was down to 10 PSI (from 45 PSI).
Few minutes later it was completely flat so I guess it was a puncture, or maybe it's because I hit to fast a half curb a little before.

Anyway, I'm too lazy to dismount the wheel to see what really happened.

Luckily we were at about 50 meters from my car when it happened.

kamikaze
2016-08-09, 03:24 PM
2) It looks like you have a rim designed for the old 36er tube that used a HUGE hole for the valve stem. I have one wheel with that and use the old "commuter" tube. Unicycle.com/uk has something similar http://www.unicycle.uk.com/unicycle-parts/rims/rim-parts/rim-hole-convertor.html and http://www.unicycle.uk.com/unicycle-parts/rims/rim-parts/valve-grommet.html, but I would contact them directly to see if they have something specifically for the older 36er rims to make it compatible with the new tube. It's not a normal Schrader size.Those are Presta to Schrader converters so they are not big enough.

Also UDC Germany doesn't sell them and I am, allegedly, the first person ever to request something like this. They have converted many 36" unis to foss tubes (apparently some people don't install them themselves?!) and this has supposedly never been a problem.

A week later I rode in the rain and a big puddle turned out to be so deep that the valve got submerged and I could hear the water slosh around inside the rim for the rest of the ride.

So like any engineer would, I decided to fix it with duct tape.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/145887287@N06/28680829781/in/dateposted-public/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/145887287@N06/28757999545/in/dateposted-public/

juggleaddict
2016-08-09, 03:41 PM
So like any engineer would, I decided to fix it with duct tape.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/145887287@N06/28680829781/in/dateposted-public/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/145887287@N06/28757999545/in/dateposted-public/

That's a great fix!

UniMyra
2018-08-14, 05:15 AM
I've been running Foss tubes in my 36'ers since 2011 without any problems, but now two tubes has failed whitin a couple of weeks. Both times there were a tiny hole next to the valve stem. My theory is that this has happended because I've repeatedly pushed the pumps valve cap to hard onto the valve in order to attach it properly.

pierrox
2018-08-14, 08:10 AM
Interesting. Also possible that their "rubber" has dried and finally the tube is cracking. Are they both about the same age?

UniMyra
2018-08-15, 07:50 AM
Interesting. Also possible that their "rubber" has dried and finally the tube is cracking. Are they both about the same age?

Both tubes were the non transparant type. Not sure about the first one, but the second one was brand new.

leo
2018-08-15, 08:16 AM
The valve is always somewhat more fragile place, but with Foss (and alike) tubes it's extra.
When putting caps then don't twist them too much, best hold the stem.

For the moment I went back to normal tubes, but still wish to have 20" latex innertubes.
But nobody wants to produce, not even when they can, or when you pay ridiculous prices for large batches.
There is a few who make 26" but adjusting (glue'ing those) is not a great option I think.